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541 results

Article

Montessori and the Hyperactive Learning Disabled Child

Publication: Communications (Association Montessori Internationale, 195?-2008), vol. 1978, no. 1

Pages: 31–34

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Language: English

ISSN: 0519-0959

Book

Active Learning: Positive Impact for Schools and Democratic Society

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Abstract/Notes: The concept of active learning is analyzed in terms of its place in the democratic school. Defined is the meaning of an effective democracy and active learning. The relationship of participation to democracy is analyzed in terms of effectiveness. Ownership and empowerment are the keys to participatory democracy. Several educators' philosophies are examined: Maria Montessori, Benjamin Bloom, and J. Goodlad. Student preparation for a democractic society is one purpose for the active learning project. Appended are 14 references. ERIC Number ED307702

Language: English

Published: Ohio: [s.n.], 1989

Master's Thesis (M.F.A.)

Early Elementary Spaces for Active Learning and Constructivist Teaching

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

Classroom environments, Constructivism (Education), Design, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Montessori schools, Prepared environment

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Abstract/Notes: The objective of this study was to evaluate how the design of the built environment can assist schoolteachers in their use of constructivist techniques as students transition from learning by play to didactic learning in early elementary learning spaces. With the increased expectations and standards for early elementary school, how can the built environment support both teachers and constructivist learning approaches such as experiential and active learning strategies to increase interactive and playful learning?Children's transition to structured schooling is associated with new experiences and challenges for students and parents. Students experience new environments, people, and modes of learning (Fabian & Dunlop, 2007). In addition to this impactful life transition as children enter primary school, increased state-mandated standards have resulted in more didactic teaching approaches in kindergarten causing an abrupt transition to sedentary learning from play focused learning in prekindergarten ("The New First Grade: Too Much Too Soon," 2006; Miller & Almon, 2009). However, Friedrich Froebel's intent for kindergarten was far different than what we see today, with kindergartens looking far different when compared to the original and prekindergarten in the United States more accurately resembling Froebel's vision (Fabian & Dunlop, 2007). Early childhood theorists, Piaget and Vygotsky, deemed learning by play essential for young children, proving critical for social and emotional skills (Wenner, 2009; Barros, Silver, & Stein, 2009; Coolahan, Fantuzzo, Mendez, & McDermott, 2000; Raver & Ziegler, 1997; Fantuzzo & McWayne, 2002; Coolahan, Fantuzzo, Mendez, & McDermott, 2000; Yogman, 2018). There is evidence to show children in early elementary school, learn best by doing; (Taylor & Boyer, 2019; Yogman, 2018) so, the physical classroom environment and supportive learning spaces should support this type of active and playful learning by providing spaces that allow teachers to engage their students in these types of learning experiences. Priorities have shifted due to increased expectations as many teachers find themselves in a dilemma balancing didactic teaching for learning standards versus developmentally appropriate practices. Design considerations of the physical classroom impact how a teacher engages students in subject matter (Byers, Imms, & Hartnell-Young, 2014; Thomas, 2010; Monahan, 2002). Design of the built environment can also assist teachers' utilization of active learning strategies through intentional space planning and design programming. This study hopes to understand how learning spaces can support active learning, equipping teachers with the spaces, layout, and technology needed to accommodate active learning practices to meet required objectives. By evaluating constructivist active learning strategies through a qualitative study, the researcher aims to use design as a tool to lessen the abrupt change from playful learning to sedentary learning commonly occurring as students transition into primary school. Findings from a teacher focus group provided the researcher with emergent themes aligning with constructivist pedagogy for Florida's early elementary learning standards. Focus group discussion provided the researcher with the design considerations and programming criteria to form a comprehensive design solution to ease the transition into didactic learning through a variety of learning environments and design considerations supportive of active learning strategies.

Language: English

Published: Tallahassee, Florida, 2022

Article

Greene Towne School stresses interactive learning

Available from: ProQuest - Historical Newspapers

Publication: Philadelphia Tribune (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)

Pages: A28

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Abstract/Notes: Greene Towne School, a Montessori preschool and Kindergarten in Center City, Philadelphia has provided young children with a Montessori education for 38 years. In the fall of 2002 we added a Toddler Program, and now accept children beginning...

Language: English

ISSN: 0746-956X

Book Section

Madame Montessori et l'école active [Maria Montessori and the active school]

Book Title: Maria Montessori e il pensiero pedagogico contemporaneo [Maria Montessori and contemporary pedagogical thought]

Pages: 109-117

Conferences, International Montessori Congress (11th, Rome, Italy, 26-28 September 1957)

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Abstract/Notes: This speech was delivered on September 26, 1957 at the 11th International Montessori Congress (Rome, Italy).

Language: French

Published: Roma, Italy: Vita dell'infanzia, 1959

Article

Lockdown Learning Highlights How Schools Fail to Build on Children's Natural Ways of Learning

Available from: Association Montessori Internationale

Publication: AMI Journal (2013-), vol. 2020

Pages: 310-313

COVID-19 Pandemic

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Language: English

ISSN: 2215-1249, 2772-7319

Book Section

Sensorial Learning as Developmental Learning ([San Francisco, Panama Pacific International Exposition] Lecture 13: 4 September 1915)

Book Title: The California Lectures of Maria Montessori, 1915: Collected Speeches and Writings by Maria Montessori

Pages: 168-176

Americas, International Montessori Training Course (3rd [course 2], San Francisco, USA, August – November 1915), Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Writings, Montessori method of education - Teacher training, North America, Panama-Pacific International Exposition (1915, San Francisco, California), Teacher training, United States of America

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Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-85109-296-3

Series: The Montessori Series , 15

Article

Learning Differences or Learning Disorders? Meeting Authentic Needs of the Three-to-Six Child

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 33, no. 2

Pages: 42–54

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, Learning disabilities, North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Blog Post

Learning from Our Mistakes: How Different Pedagogies Influence Students' Learning Strategies

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Abstract/Notes: New research demonstrates different learning strategies taught to children at school affects error-monitoring by the brain.

Language: English

Published: Sep 4, 2020

Doctoral Dissertation

Learning to Fly: The Impact of Project-Based Learning on Development of the 4Cs in the Elementary Grades

Available from: University of Massachusetts Global - ScholarWorks

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Abstract/Notes: Purpose: The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to investigate the impact of project-based learning on K-5 students’ development of the 4Cs (Critical Thinking, Communication, Creativity, Collaboration) as perceived by elementary charter school teachers. Methodology: A phenomenological design was selected to address the research questions for this study. Through purposeful sampling, 12 charter elementary teachers who met a pre-determined set of criteria (including the routine integration of project-based learning within their instructional programs) were selected to participate in virtual, semi-structured interviews. All teachers were employed by charter schools located in six counties within California. The interviews were conducted using a researcher-developed protocol. Artifacts in the form of student work, planning documents, and project overviews were also collected and evaluated. Once organized, the researcher coded and analyzed the data for themes. Findings: Data analysis revealed that the participating teachers regularly integrated 4Cs skills into their instructional practice. When planning PBL (collaboratively or independently), specific skills might be targeted, but all four skills were often assumed as necessary for project success. Prior to project implementation, teachers worked to build a classroom culture so that students felt safe and understood the expectations of project work. Cycles of inquiry began with a driving question or challenging problem that students worked (primarily in teams) to answer or solve. Students then presented their learning in varied ways to different audiences. Assessment was challenging for most 4C areas, with communication being the skill most frequently assessed formally due to its inclusion in the Common Core State Standards. Conclusions: The implementation of project-based learning supports the development of critical thinking, communication, creativity, and communication by providing ample opportunities for students to practice and build capacity. Additionally, students develop a sense of ownership, agency, and empowerment as learners and can make authentic connections to their lives. PBL also develops real-world skills that are transferable well beyond the classroom. Finally, COVID-19 eliminated PBL during remote learning with some exceptions. Communication and collaboration were most impacted. Recommendations: Ten areas of further research were recommended to increase the body of knowledge related to these variables.

Language: English

Published: Irvine, California, 2022

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