Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

852 results

Master's Thesis

The Extent That Montessori Programs Contribute to Students' Academic and Social Gains and How Montessori Programs Differ from Traditional Programs

Available from: Google Scholar

See More

Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this paper, through a review of current research, is to compare and contrast the Montessori Method and traditional programs and to identify the extent of the social and academic benefit from each. Researchers have found that there are some academic advantages to both programs. However, the academic gains that a child makes in traditional prekindergarten programs appear to diminish as the child gets older. Socially, children who have attended Montessori programs appear to enjoy school and have better relationships with peers and teachers than those in traditional program. An important thing to note is much of this research is inconclusive because of sampling bias due to study design. It is my recommendation that some of the aspects of Montessori education be incorporated into the traditional programs and that this continue as a supplement to the regular school day. Perhaps if students continue to be provided with additional support as they are in prekindergarten, the academic gains experienced as a result could be longer lasting.

Language: English

Published: Marquette, Michigan, 2009

Book

The Advanced Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to the Education of Children from Seven to Eleven Years. Volume 1, Spontaneous Activity in Education

Maria Montessori - Writings, Montessori method of education

See More

Language: English

Published: Oxford, England: Clio, 1991

Edition: 1st Clio ed.

ISBN: 1-85109-114-9 978-1-85109-114-0

Series: The Clio Montessori series , 9

Volume: 1 of 2

Book

The Advanced Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to the Education of Children from Seven to Eleven Years. Volume 1, Spontaneous Activity in Education

Maria Montessori - Writings, Montessori method of education

See More

Abstract/Notes: Also known by the title: Spontaneous Activity in Education.

Language: English

Published: Oxford, England: Clio, 1997

ISBN: 1-85109-114-9

Series: The Clio Montessori series , 9

Volume: 1 of 2

Article

NCME Welcomes Two New Teacher Education Programs [Saint Louis Center/Montessori Education; Maine Montessori Institute]

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 25, no. 4

Pages: 35

See More

Language: English

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Integration of peace education into early childhood education programs

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: International Journal of Early Childhood, vol. 28, no. 2

Pages: 29-36

Peace education

See More

Abstract/Notes: Preschool educators may observe that this unique historical period is an opportunity to integrate peace education into the educational program. The communication that has developed thanks to new technology has offered the opportunity for transformation. Teaching, nonviolence, conflict resolution, well-being, economic, political participation and interest in the environment can be considered as concepts of education for peace. This visionary idea includes global education, prevention of violence, character education and moral education. The educational program and methods of education for peace of preschool children (from birth to 8 years old) include different themes: 1) promote cooperation and resolve conflicts 2) respect for self and authority; 3) appreciation of diversity 4) the role of permeating cultural violence including television, video games, films and dramatic games stimulated by toys and representations of violent actions. These central themes contain the hope that the principles contained in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child will be applied. Parents' participation seen as essential agents in decision-making concerning their children is a fundamental concept. The study of this event produced a visionary model, identified as education for peace, with the participation of parents. OMEP members act as catalysts for peace education efforts with an emphasis on intercultural education. Peace education was, is and will be a goal of pre-school and primary education for all educators around the world. There is a great need for activities in preschool, primary and other educational programs to reduce tensions peacefully.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/BF03174500

ISSN: 0020-7187, 1878-4658

Report

Hartford Early Childhood Program, Hartford, Connecticut: An Urban Public School System's Large-Scale Approach Toward Restructuring Early Childhood Education. Model Programs - Childhood Education

Available from: ERIC

See More

Abstract/Notes: The Hartford Early Childhood Program involves more than 4,500 children from 4 years old to first grade level in over 200 classrooms. Classrooms are designed to offer children an environment that encourages them to learn independently. Ideas have been borrowed from the Montessori approach and the British Infant Schools and fitted to the needs of the Hartford school district's urban students. The program philosophy embodies new approaches that can be used in old school buildings such as formal education beginning at 3 years, mixed-age "family" grouping, interest centers, and emphasis on intrinsic motivation toward personel success. Future plans call for extension of the program to all public school classes in grades K through 2. Sources of more detailed information are provided for this program, specifically, and for Model Programs Childhood Education, in general. (Author/WY)

Language: English

Published: Palo Alto, California, 1970

Article

Montessori Spotlight: Teacher Education Action Commission (TEAC) - Supporting Teacher Education Programs

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 34, no. 2

Pages: 16-17

See More

Abstract/Notes: Debbie Sheehan, a TEAC Elementary representative, describes her experience: "TEAC provides teacher education program directors and instructors the opportunity to work with seasoned Montessori directors and instructors from various teacher education programs. Currently, AMS is piloting a training program for teacher education programs and their adult learners. Between meetings, members are expected to participate in work groups and subcommittees, review and recommend teacher education programs for affiliation, review and make recommendations for teacher education standards, and serve as ambassadors for the larger teacher education community.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Une éducation pour une ère nouvelle: le congrès international d’éducation de Calais (1921) [Education for a new era: the international congress of education in Calais (1921)]

Available from: CAIRN

Publication: Les Études Sociales, vol. 163, no. 1

Pages: 43-77

Europe, France, New Education Fellowship, New Education Movement, Theosophical Society, Theosophy, Western Europe

See More

Abstract/Notes: Renouant avec les pratiques d’échanges intellectuels d’avant 1914, des spécialistes de l’éducation d’une quinzaine de pays, appartenant à l’enseignement public comme au secteur privé, tiennent un congrès original, durant deux semaines, à Calais. Au-delà du thème qui les rassemble, « l’expression créatrice de l’enfant », éducateurs théosophes, pédologues et psychologues de l’enfant, praticiens des écoles nouvelles et représentants de l’institution scolaire débattent d’une conception de l’éducation pertinente pour l’ère nouvelle de l’humanité qu’ils appellent de leurs vœux. Conscients d’ouvrir un chantier immense, les personnalités majeures du rassemblement calaisien (B. Ensor, O. Decroly, A. Ferrière) mettent à profit le congrès pour fonder une organisation durable qui poursuivra la réflexion : la Ligue internationale pour l’éducation nouvelle. [Reviving the practices of intellectual exchange that began before 1914, education specialists from some fifteen countries, belonging to public and private school organizations, gathered for an original congress held over two weeks in Calais. Beyond the matter that brought them together, dedicated to “the creative expression of children,” educators, theosophists, pedologists and child psychologists, practitioners of New Education and school officials, discussed what could be the significant educational concepts for the new age of humanity they expected. Conscious of launching a huge project, the prominent personalities of the Calais gathering (Béatrice Ensor, Ovide Decroly, and Adolphe Ferrière) built on that project to create a sustainable organization that could carry on discussions: The New Education Fellowship.]

Language: French

DOI: 10.3917/etsoc.163.0043

ISSN: 0014-2204

Article

Achieving Inclusive Education in Early Childhood: From the Viewpoint of an Affinity Between Inclusive Education and Montessori Education

Publication: Montessori Kyōiku / モンテッソーリ教育 [Montessori Education], no. 49

Pages: 100-113

Asia, East Asia, Inclusive education, Japan, Montessori method of education

See More

Abstract/Notes: This is an article from Montessori Education, a Japanese language periodical published by the Japan Association Montessori.

Language: Japanese

ISSN: 0913-4220

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

A New Education for a New Era: The Contribution of the Conferences of the New Education Fellowship to the Disciplinary Field of Education 1921–1938

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Paedagogica Historica: International Journal of the History of Education, vol. 40, no. 5-6

Pages: 733-755

New Education Fellowship, New Education Movement, Theosophical Society, Theosophy

See More

Abstract/Notes: This article examines the role played by the conferences of the New Education Fellowship (NEF) in the emerging disciplinary field of the sciences of education between the two world wars. As Fuchs points out in an article in the present issue, the field of education at this time was being internationalized, and, being an international movement, the field impacted on by the NEF was international in scope.1 As will be seen, the ideas and practices of the new education were mediated by national cultural differences and thus their impact on the disciplinary field varied from nation to nation.2 In addition, the development of the field in terms of journals, conferences and its institutionalization within nations was uneven, which presents further difficulties when trying to evaluate the impact of the NEF's conferences. Much of the following discussion focuses on their impact on the disciplinary field in England though, as will be seen, not exclusively so. One of the distinguishing features of the NEF other than its international scope was that it was a movement that connected lay enthusiasts for the educational reforms associated with the new education with major figures in the developing disciplines of psychology and education, such as Carl Gustav Jung, Jean Piaget and John Dewey. The relation between these lay and professional constituencies is examined and conclusions drawn regarding the professionalizing process in the field and the impact of the conferences on educational research and its institutionalization.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/0030923042000293742

ISSN: 0030-9230, 1477-674X

Advanced Search