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108 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Understanding School Engagement: The Role of Contextual Continuities and Discontinuities in Adolescents' Learner Identities

Available from: ScienceDirect

Publication: Learning, Culture and Social Interaction, vol. 28

Pages: 100460

Europe, Holland, Netherlands, Western Europe

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Abstract/Notes: Adolescents' school engagement is related to continuities and discontinuities in learning notions between various contexts (e.g., school, home, peer groups). Learning notions are the prevalent ideas in a context about appropriate learning goals, contents and means. It has remained unclear how adolescents' learner identities mediate the role that (dis-)continuities play in adolescents' school engagement. To advance insight into adolescents' school engagement, we examined what relations could be found between various contextual (dis-)continuities in learning notions adolescents with diverse levels of school engagement experience and their learner identities. Our comparative case study suggests that especially (dis-)continuities regarding notions of what it entails to be a good learner and the importance of being one between the school context on the one hand, and the contexts of home and peer groups on the other inform students' school-related learner identities. The present study implies that adolescents' school engagement can be fostered by building continuities between school and home in the appreciation of students' efforts and by making them resilient to unconstructive learning notions in home and peer group contexts.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1016/j.lcsi.2020.100460

ISSN: 2210-6561

Master's Thesis

Mississippi River Program: A Mixed-Method Examination of the Effects of a Place-Based Curriculum on the Environmental Knowledge and Awareness of Montessori Adolescents

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Comparative education, Mississippi River Program, Sustainability

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Abstract/Notes: The Mississippi River Program was an interdisciplinary environmental education curriculum implemented in La Crosse, Wisconsin. The program integrated theory and practice of experiential, environmental, adventure, and place-based education, and was designed, implemented and assessed by the researcher. Effects of the Mississippi River Program on the environmental knowledge and awareness of middle school adolescents were unknown at the onset of this study. This was a quasi-experimental design involving non-random sampling of a charter Montessori Middle School as the experimental group (n=17), and a sample of public middle school students as the comparison group (n=18). A mixed-methods approach entailed quantitative assessment of mean pretest and posttest scores on the Environmental Knowledge and Beliefs Questionnaire, and a qualitative analysis of reflective papers written by the Montessori group. The research instrument was drawn directly from the state standards for environmental education for middle school adolescents, published by the Wisconsin Department of Instruction (1998). Results of ANOVA indicated a significant improvement in mean scores from pretest to posttest for the experimental group, with no significant difference in scores for the comparison group (p=.0002). Quantitative results revealed that Item Six of the survey instrument contributed significantly to the increase in scores (p=.0000). This Item required knowledge of environmental agencies, which the experimental group gained during “Outdoor Careers Day.” Student reflective papers written about experiences during this event were qualitatively assessed using an emergent open coding method, which revealed five environmental learning themes. Qualitative findings reinforced the quantitative results, indicating that the program participants improved significantly in knowledge of environmental content areas; and awareness of a personal relationship with, and responsibility to, the environment. Further investigations are needed to increase the research base for programs that incorporate multiple outdoor education models. Innovative educational approaches would also benefit from research on the long term effects of participation in these programs.

Language: English

Published: Mankato, Minnesota, 2006

Article

Characteristics and Needs of Adolescents: A Comparative Study

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 18, no. 3

Pages: 87-91

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Abstract/Notes: Provides a comparative overview of the developmental characteristics and needs of adolescents according to (1) the Carnegie Council on Adolescent Development's report "Turning Points"; (2) Gayle Dorman's "Planning Programs for Young Adolescents"; (3) Maria Montessori's "From Childhood to Adolescence" and Margaret E. Stephenson's "The Adolescent and the Future"; and (4) Larry Schaefer's "A Montessori Vision of Adolescence." (MDM)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Redefining Who We Are: The Work of a Learning Community; Facing Adolescents/Facing Ourselves

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 28, no. 2

Pages: 31-47

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Abstract/Notes: It is within the prepared environment of the adolescent learning community that the adult comes into full connection with Montessori's universal picture of optimal development. Adolescents' search for meaning enables adults to come to a clearer understanding of the human condition. Thus, teachers of adolescents must endeavor to model the ideals of ethical behavior, the nature of intellectual competence, and the goal of developing one's optimal potential. (KB)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Using the Assistants to Infancy for Pre-Adolescents: Anticipating a Healthy Parenthood

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 27, no. 1

Pages: 189-213

Adolescents, Assistants to Infancy, Child development, Early childhood education, Elementary education, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Parent and child, Upper elementary

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Abstract/Notes: Discusses how Montessori infant and toddler communities provide an occasion for child development education for upper elementary and adolescent students within the school. Uses a question-and-answer format to illustrate how the program addresses the reality of lifestyles other than that of the traditional family.

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Doctoral Dissertation

Examining Montessori Middle School Through a Self-Determination Theory Lens: A Mixed Methods Study of the Lived Experiences of Adolescents

Available from: University of California eScholarship

Self-determination, Self-determination theory

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori education was developed over a century ago. Dr. Montessori and her followers designed learning environments to meet the academic, social and psychological needs of students from eighteen months to eighteen years old. Within her writings and books, Dr. Montessori described strategies and structures that support autonomy, competence and relatedness. These same supports are found within Self-determination Theory (SDT) literature. Research points towards a link between satisfaction of the basic needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness and increased resilience, goal achievement, and feelings of well-being. . This study examined the influence of enrollment on the development of self- determination in a Montessori middle school which is intentionally created to support the development of autonomy, competence, and relatedness on adolescents. Bounded by self-determination, critical, and student voice theory, this research was designed to give voice to the most important stakeholders in education, add to the discourse on middle school reform, and provide the perspective of the student to the critique of middle level education. Based on the analysis of narrative, the major themes which represented all participants in all cycles were indicators of the importance of autonomy and relatedness. Two themes, "choose type of work", "choose order of tasks" illustrate the importance of autonomy to this group of students. The last major theme, "help me stay on top of things" highlighted the importance of relatedness to the study group. From these themes implications for middle level educators, educational leaders and future researchers were developed. Participants in the study voiced strong opinions about practices which supported autonomy and relatedness. Students valued the ability to choose the order of their tasks and the tasks they could choose to demonstrate understanding as well as the ability to re-take tests. These changes require a paradigm shift to a student- centered learning environment. Educational leaders can support this shift through providing staff development and planning time. Future research suggested by this study include studies which could further examine a possible link between relatedness support and student achievement and studies designed to capture the voices of students with a low measured SDT

Language: English

Published: San Diego, California, 2013

Article

A Montessori Community for Adolescents

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 24, no. 1

Pages: 133-164

, Camillo Grazzini - Writings, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Discusses adolescents' needs, asserting that the Erdkinder environment is Montessori's answer to those needs. Outlines various aspects of the Erdkinder environment. Concludes by summarizing what needs to be done to work towards establishing Erdkinder communities in secondary education.

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Re-Teaching a Thing Its Loveliness: Montessori Teachers, Montessori Adolescents, and Forgiveness

Publication: Montessori Leadership

Pages: 26–27

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Language: English

Article

Technology, Togetherness, and Adolescents: Creating a Meaningful Adolescent Learning Community in the Digital Age

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 41, no. 2

Pages: 109-129

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Abstract/Notes: Ben Moudry has written a comprehensive overview of the current challenges facing parents, schools, administrators, and students regarding what he calls "handheld computers," commonly known as smart phones. His annotated statistics and description of American society in 2015 are frightening in their clarity, while the percentages and numbers of technology overuse and distraction are increasing. From his position at The Grove School, Moudry describes a path to creating a community-informed technology policy that is aligned with the school's mission, vision, and values and serves to improve communications and cooperation models for managing a farm. [This paper was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "A Montessori Integrated Approach to Science, Mathematics, Technology, and the Environment" in Portland, OR, Mar 31-Apr 3, 2016.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Caught in the Middle: Teaching Interdependence to Early Adolescents in the Montessori Middle School

Publication: Tomorrow's Child, vol. 2, no. 2

Pages: 2–5

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

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