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916 results

Doctoral Dissertation

Barriers Contributing to the Minimal Participation of African American Parents in Their Children's Schools: A Qualitative Case Study of African American Parent Involvement in an Urban K–8 Elementary School in Minnesota

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

African American community, African Americans, Americas, North America, Early childhood education - Parent participation, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Parent participation, Parent-teacher relationships, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This research is a case study of African American parent involvement at a urban Montessori school in Minnesota. African American parents at this school have had limited involvement in conferences, PTSO meetings, school activities, and on the Site-Based Leadership Team. An examination of the literature was made to investigate the influences on African American parents when they make decisions about their parental involvement. This research covered the historical background, theoretical background, implications, racial barriers, and strategies that increased African American parent involvement. An ethnography was designed to gather data from 9 mothers of African American students. These parents provided information about their backgrounds and their experiences with the school. Staff at the school (6) were interviewed as to their experiences with African American parent involvement. The results of the study offer findings on attitudes, perceptions, needs and ideas for improving African American parent involvement at any school.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2000

Doctoral Dissertation

Evaluating the Effectiveness of Montessori Reading and Math Instruction for Third Grade African American Students in Urban Elementary Schools

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

African American children, African American community, Americas, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Improving academic achievement for students of color has long been the subject of debate among advocates of education reform (Anyon, 2013; Breitborde & Swiniarski, 2006; Payne, 2008). Some scholars have advocated for the Montessori method as an alternative educational approach to address some chronic problems in public education (Lillard, 2005; Murray, 2011, 2015; Torrance, 2012). Montessori programs are expanding in public schools (National Center for Montessori in the Public Sector, 2014c) at a time when the American public school population is more racially diverse than ever before (Maxwell, 2014). A review of the literature reflects a lack of consensus about the efficacy of Montessori elementary instruction for students of color in general, and lack of attention to outcomes for African American students specifically (Dawson, 1987; Dohrmann, Nishisda, Gartner, Lipsky, & Grimm, 2007; Lopata, Wallace, & Finn, 2005; Mallet & Schroeder, 2015). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of reading and math instruction for third grade African American students in public Montessori, traditional, and other school choice settings, using end-of-grade standardized test scores from a large, urban district in North Carolina. Stratified sampling was used to select demographically similar traditional and magnet schools for comparison. Group mean reading and math test scores were compared using factorial MANCOVA and MANOVA procedures. African American students at grade three were found to perform at significantly higher levels in both reading and math in public Montessori schools than in traditional schools. No statistically significant difference was found in math achievement between African American third grade students in public Montessori and other magnet programs, although the Montessori group did achieve at significantly higher levels in reading. This suggests that the Montessori method can be an effective pedagogy for African American students, particularly in reading. Based on these results, recommendations are provided for policy, practice, and future research.

Language: English

Published: Charlotte, North Carolina, 2016

Article

A Comparison of Reading and Math Achievement for African American Third Grade Students in Montessori and Other Magnet Schools

Available from: JSTOR

Publication: Journal of Negro Education, vol. 86, no. 4

Pages: 439-448

Academic achievement, African American community, African Americans, Americas, Comparative education, Lower elementary, Mathematics - Academic achievement, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, Reading - Academic achievement, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori programs are expanding in public schools, serving a large proportion of African American students. Although recent Montessori research has focused on diverse public school populations, few studies have examined outcomes for African American students at the lower elementary level. This quasi-experimental study compares reading and math achievement for African American third grade students in public Montessori and other magnet schools in a large, urban district in North Carolina. Scores from end-of-grade state tests of reading and math are compared using a multivariate analysis of covariance. No significant difference in math scores was identified, but students in Montessori schools scored significantly higher in reading. This suggests that Montessori lower elementary instruction may be beneficial for African American students.

Language: English

DOI: 10.7709/jnegroeducation.86.4.0439

ISSN: 0022-2984

Report

Reading and Math Achievement for African American Lower Elementary Students in Public Montessori Programs

Available from: National Center for Montessori in the Public Sector (NCMPS)

Academic achievement, African American community, African Americans, Americas, Arithmetic - Achievement, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Lower elementary, Mathematics - Achievement, Montessori method of education, North America, Public Montessori

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Abstract/Notes: As Montessori programs in public schools expand, Montessori education is becoming available to a more diverse population of American students than ever before. Students of color have a significant presence in public Montessori schools; over a quarter of students in whole-school public Montessori programs are African American. As these programs grow, researchers have increasingly directed their attention to demonstrating that Montessori works in public schools; however, few studies have examined outcomes for African American students at the lower elementary level, when critical reading and math skills are being established. This study sought to answer the question, how effectively does Montessori instruction promote achievement for African American third grade students in reading and math, compared to similar traditional schools and other public school choice programs?

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., 2016

Article

Immersion and Identity: Experiences of an African American Preschool Child

Available from: International Journal of Multicultural Education

Publication: International Journal of Multicultural Education, vol. 12, no. 2

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Bilingualism, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This article explores the benefits and challenges of a Spanish language immersion preschool from the perspective of a non-Spanish speaking African American family.  Data explored include the decision to enroll, reactions from peers and family, home-school communication issues, language development, and family involvement.  In addition, recommendations for families considering this bilingual option are considered. The primary data used for this article come from 127 journal entries written by the mother of the child from the beginning of the preschool admissions process until the end of preschool.

Language: English

DOI: 10.18251/ijme.v12i2.306

ISSN: 1934-5267

Article

Teaching to Be American: The Quest for Integrating the Italian-American Child

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: History of Education, vol. 44, no. 5

Pages: 651-666

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Abstract/Notes: In the early years of the twentieth century, the great structural, social and cultural changes in American society included a growing number of immigrants arriving from the poorest regions of Europe. For the first time, the issues of immigration, assimilation and social integration became the most important problems facing American society. In the optimistic climate of the so-called progressive era, social reformers thought that these problems could be solved by the science of pedagogy, as applied to the educational needs of foreign immigrants. This essay centres on the pedagogical efforts of Italian-American educator Angelo Patri, who attempted to integrate Italian-American children into the fabric of American society through education. It starts by assessing Patri’s early writings, such as A Schoolmaster of the Great City, and his private and professional papers. In doing so, his work is situated in the debate on progressive education alongside pedagogue Maria Montessori, demonstrating his central role in the debate on integration through education. Within this analysis, particular attention is paid to the notion of learning by doing, and it is argued that both educators were influenced by this particular aspect of progressive education.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/0046760X.2015.1063710

ISSN: 0046-760X

Article

Predominantly Black Institutions and Public Montessori Schools: Reclaiming the “Genius” in African American Children

Available from: De Gruyter

Publication: Multicultural Learning and Teaching, vol. 13, no. 1

Pages: Article 20170007

, Montessori approach

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Abstract/Notes: There are more than 22,000 Montessori schools in over 100 countries worldwide. Beginning in the 1950s the American Montessori movement was primarily a private pre-school movement. There are more than 5,000 schools in the United States; over 500 of these are public. Montessori schools are an increasingly popular choice in the U.S. for public school districts looking to improve their educational outcomes. Predominantly Black Institutions (PBIs) can play a pivotal role by integrating Montessori education within their teacher preparation programs. As the demand for Montessori education increases there will be a need for more highly-qualified, culturally and linguistically diverse teachers who have the appropriate credentials and can implement the Montessori approach. Scientific research confirms that children who attend Montessori schools are advantaged academically, socially and emotionally. Communities such as Milwaukee and Chicago are now implementing Montessori education through public schools as part of school reform efforts making the educational approach more accessible to African American children.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1515/mlt-2017-0007

ISSN: 2161-2412

Article

Building a Just Adolescent Community

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 20, no. 1

Pages: 36-42

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Abstract/Notes: Lawrence Kohlberg, a psychologist, coined the term "Just Community" to describe a community built on trust and resolution, in which each member participates democratically in the development of the rules and regulations that govern their community life (Kohlberg, 1985). In a school, this means that students and teachers alike actively participate in moral discussions about issues involving relationships between students and staff; each member of the community is held accountable to the group (Kohlberg, 1985). As such, the Just Community represents a type of moral laboratory, an opportunity for students to discuss and resolve moral issues that arise, and equally if not more importantly, to "act" morally in accordance with the rules set forth by the group. Kohlberg saw the Just Community as based on the concepts of justice (fairness and equal rights), and benevolence (social responsibility and altruism), and as inspired by a sense of group solidarity. Thus, broadly speaking, the Just Community represents a type of benevolent participatory democracy. The importance of many of the principles underlying a Just Community, such as justice, equal rights, and benevolence, have been recognized for many years. Creating a Just Community among junior high students requires an understanding of the unique developmental characteristics and needs of the adolescent age. In this article, the authors highlight the physical, social, cognitive, and emotional characteristics of young adolescents and the needs these characteristics suggest. Although they discuss these characteristics and needs in four realms, these realms are clearly interconnected in adolescence, just as in earlier stages of development (National Research Council and Institute on Medicine [NRCIM], 2006). The physical changes brought on by puberty heighten social, emotional, and intellectual tensions-- the adolescent is making, at times, the awkward transition from child to adult.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Nurturing the Child's Spirit through Literature: An African-American Resource Guide

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 29, no. 1

Pages: 26–31

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Language: English

Article

Synergy in the Montessori Community

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 31, no. 2

Pages: 9

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Abstract/Notes: Nancy McCormick Rambusch, founder of the American Montessori Society, described the application and significance of synergy in The Authentic American Montessori School: A Guide for the Self-Study, Evaluation, and Accreditation of American Schools Committed to Montessori Education (AMS, 1992). [...]creating synergy within a Montessori community to reach the specific goals of our organization requires common effort through building a scaffolding of support: * providing time and opportunity for all members to share perspectives and thoughts * encouraging open-minded listening * appreciating and understanding all members' perspectives * identifying and clarifying the work ahead * developing consensus about steps needed to reach a goal and taking ownership of those steps * evaluating, assessing, and reflecting on the results of community effort * planning for the future Helen Keller once said, "Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much" (1980, p. 489). Appreciating the power of synergy can help a community comprehend the negative impact ofbeing unwilling to accept others.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

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