Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

490 results

Doctoral Dissertation

Barriers Contributing to the Minimal Participation of African American Parents in Their Children's Schools: A Qualitative Case Study of African American Parent Involvement in an Urban K–8 Elementary School in Minnesota

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Early childhood care and education - Parent participation, Early childhood education - Parent participation, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Parent participation, Parent-teacher relationships, United States of America

See More

Abstract/Notes: This research is a case study of African American parent involvement at a urban Montessori school in Minnesota. African American parents at this school have had limited involvement in conferences, PTSO meetings, school activities, and on the Site-Based Leadership Team. An examination of the literature was made to investigate the influences on African American parents when they make decisions about their parental involvement. This research covered the historical background, theoretical background, implications, racial barriers, and strategies that increased African American parent involvement. An ethnography was designed to gather data from 9 mothers of African American students. These parents provided information about their backgrounds and their experiences with the school. Staff at the school (6) were interviewed as to their experiences with African American parent involvement. The results of the study offer findings on attitudes, perceptions, needs and ideas for improving African American parent involvement at any school.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2000

Book

What American Montessori Can Offer American Education and How Montessori Theory Fares in the Light of American Research

See More

Language: English

Published: [Illinois]: Illinois Montessori Society, 1963

Report

Reading and Math Achievement for African American Lower Elementary Students in Public Montessori Programs

Available from: National Center for Montessori in the Public Sector (NCMPS)

Academic achievement, African American community, African Americans, Americas, Arithmetic - Achievement, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Lower elementary, Mathematics - Achievement, Montessori method of education, North America, Public Montessori

See More

Abstract/Notes: As Montessori programs in public schools expand, Montessori education is becoming available to a more diverse population of American students than ever before. Students of color have a significant presence in public Montessori schools; over a quarter of students in whole-school public Montessori programs are African American. As these programs grow, researchers have increasingly directed their attention to demonstrating that Montessori works in public schools; however, few studies have examined outcomes for African American students at the lower elementary level, when critical reading and math skills are being established. This study sought to answer the question, how effectively does Montessori instruction promote achievement for African American third grade students in reading and math, compared to similar traditional schools and other public school choice programs?

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., 2016

Doctoral Dissertation (Ed.D.)

Searching for Equity in Education: A Qualitative Study Examining the Experiences of African American Families in Accessing and Financing Montessori Education

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

See More

Abstract/Notes: In this qualitative, interpretive study, I examine the experiences of African American families in accessing and financing Montessori education in the United States, including African American families who did or did not eventually enroll their child(ren) in Montessori schools. The extant literature notes that African American families are disproportionately underrepresented in Montessori schools, despite an interest in this form of education. Grounded in the theoretical framework of critical race theory, I analyze participants’ perspectives on the role of race, and relatedly class, on what helped or hindered their awareness of, access to, and financing of Montessori education. Through 45–60-minute interviews with 13 African American families characterized as interested in enrolling their children in Montessori education, I found the following themes in regard to my research questions. First, participants’ experiences were noted as the power of social capital, challenge of logistics, and competing tensions in enrollment decision making. Second, hindrances to participants’ access and financing of Montessori education included: financial and financial aid barriers, gaps in equitable communication and marketing strategies, and limited diversity & equity initiatives. Third, participants found sources of support for accessing and financing Montessori education through a guiding belief in the philosophy of Montessori education and external change agents. Implications for theory and practice are included.

Language: English

Published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 2022

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Predominantly Black Institutions and Public Montessori Schools: Reclaiming the "Genius" in African American Children

Available from: De Gruyter

Publication: Multicultural Learning and Teaching, vol. 13, no. 1

Pages: Article 20170007

See More

Abstract/Notes: There are more than 22,000 Montessori schools in over 100 countries worldwide. Beginning in the 1950s the American Montessori movement was primarily a private pre-school movement. There are more than 5,000 schools in the United States; over 500 of these are public. Montessori schools are an increasingly popular choice in the U.S. for public school districts looking to improve their educational outcomes. Predominantly Black Institutions (PBIs) can play a pivotal role by integrating Montessori education within their teacher preparation programs. As the demand for Montessori education increases there will be a need for more highly-qualified, culturally and linguistically diverse teachers who have the appropriate credentials and can implement the Montessori approach. Scientific research confirms that children who attend Montessori schools are advantaged academically, socially and emotionally. Communities such as Milwaukee and Chicago are now implementing Montessori education through public schools as part of school reform efforts making the educational approach more accessible to African American children.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1515/mlt-2017-0007

ISSN: 2161-2412

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

A Comparison of Reading and Math Achievement for African American Third Grade Students in Montessori and Other Magnet Schools

Available from: JSTOR

Publication: Journal of Negro Education, vol. 86, no. 4

Pages: 439-448

Academic achievement, African American community, African Americans, Americas, Comparative education, Lower elementary, Mathematics - Academic achievement, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, Reading - Academic achievement, United States of America

See More

Abstract/Notes: Montessori programs are expanding in public schools, serving a large proportion of African American students. Although recent Montessori research has focused on diverse public school populations, few studies have examined outcomes for African American students at the lower elementary level. This quasi-experimental study compares reading and math achievement for African American third grade students in public Montessori and other magnet schools in a large, urban district in North Carolina. Scores from end-of-grade state tests of reading and math are compared using a multivariate analysis of covariance. No significant difference in math scores was identified, but students in Montessori schools scored significantly higher in reading. This suggests that Montessori lower elementary instruction may be beneficial for African American students.

Language: English

DOI: 10.7709/jnegroeducation.86.4.0439

ISSN: 0022-2984, 2167-6437

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Immersion and Identity: Experiences of an African American Preschool Child

Available from: International Journal of Multicultural Education

Publication: International Journal of Multicultural Education, vol. 12, no. 2

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Bilingualism, North America, United States of America

See More

Abstract/Notes: This article explores the benefits and challenges of a Spanish language immersion preschool from the perspective of a non-Spanish speaking African American family.  Data explored include the decision to enroll, reactions from peers and family, home-school communication issues, language development, and family involvement.  In addition, recommendations for families considering this bilingual option are considered. The primary data used for this article come from 127 journal entries written by the mother of the child from the beginning of the preschool admissions process until the end of preschool.

Language: English

DOI: 10.18251/ijme.v12i2.306

ISSN: 1934-5267

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

Evaluating the Effectiveness of Montessori Reading and Math Instruction for Third Grade African American Students in Urban Elementary Schools

Available from: American Montessori Society

African American children, African American community, Americas, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

See More

Abstract/Notes: Improving academic achievement for students of color has long been the subject of debate among advocates of education reform (Anyon, 2013; Breitborde & Swiniarski, 2006; Payne, 2008). Some scholars have advocated for the Montessori method as an alternative educational approach to address some chronic problems in public education (Lillard, 2005; Murray, 2011, 2015; Torrance, 2012). Montessori programs are expanding in public schools (National Center for Montessori in the Public Sector, 2014c) at a time when the American public school population is more racially diverse than ever before (Maxwell, 2014). A review of the literature reflects a lack of consensus about the efficacy of Montessori elementary instruction for students of color in general, and lack of attention to outcomes for African American students specifically (Dawson, 1987; Dohrmann, Nishisda, Gartner, Lipsky, & Grimm, 2007; Lopata, Wallace, & Finn, 2005; Mallet & Schroeder, 2015). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of reading and math instruction for third grade African American students in public Montessori, traditional, and other school choice settings, using end-of-grade standardized test scores from a large, urban district in North Carolina. Stratified sampling was used to select demographically similar traditional and magnet schools for comparison. Group mean reading and math test scores were compared using factorial MANCOVA and MANOVA procedures. African American students at grade three were found to perform at significantly higher levels in both reading and math in public Montessori schools than in traditional schools. No statistically significant difference was found in math achievement between African American third grade students in public Montessori and other magnet programs, although the Montessori group did achieve at significantly higher levels in reading. This suggests that the Montessori method can be an effective pedagogy for African American students, particularly in reading. Based on these results, recommendations are provided for policy, practice, and future research.

Language: English

Published: Charlotte, North Carolina, 2016

Article

Nurturing the Child's Spirit through Literature: An African-American Resource Guide

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 29, no. 1

Pages: 26–31

See More

Language: English

Article

Effects of Applying AMSP (American Montessori Society Program) According to the Years of Mathematics / 수학연한에 따른 AMSP (American Montessori Society Program)의 적용효과: 유아의 창의성과 지능에 미치는 영향을 중심으로

Available from: RISS

Publication: 교육과학연구 / Journal of Educational Science Research, vol. 35, no. 2

Pages: 233-251

See More

Abstract/Notes: This study investigated the effects of AMSP(American Montessori Society) on young children's creativity and intelligence according to the learning term.The questions for research were as follows:1. What is the effect of AMSP on young children's creativity according to the learning term?2. What is the effect of AMSP on young children's intelligence according to the learning term? The subjects of this study were 57 aged five-old children at H kindergarten in J. City. They were classified to three groups according to learning term of AMSP.The data were collected using the General Creativity Test for Children(Chon, kyoung-won, 2000), the Revised Korean Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (Park, kwang-bae 1995), and analysed by ANCOVA, the Scheffe test with SPSS 11.0 Program.The results of this study are summarized as follows:1. The longer the learning term was, the more AMSP improved young children's creativity significantly. The longer the learning term was, the more AMSP improved young children's creativity significantly. 2.The longer the learning term was, the more AMSP improved young children's intelligence significantly. The longer the learning term was, the more AMSP improved young children's intelligence significantly. / 본 연구는 AMSP가 유아의 창의성과 지능에 미치는 영향에 있어 수업연한에 따른 차이를 알아본 것으로, AMSP의 수업연한에 따라 구분된 1년차 집단, 2년차 집단, 3년차 집단 각 19명씩 만 5세 유아 총 57명을 대상으로 실시하였다. 전경원(2000)의 창의성 검사와 박혜원곽금주박광배(1996) 등이 개발한 한국형WPPSI(K-WPPIS)를 실시한 결과, AMSP의 수업연한이 높을수록 유아의 창의성과 지능발달에 전반적으로 더 큰 효과를 나타냈다. 이에 AMSP가 유아의 창의성과 지능발달을 돕는 하나의 효과적인 접근방안일 뿐만 아니라 유치원의 3년 교육 기간에 AMSP를 제공받는 것이 유아의 창의성과 지능발달에 더 효과적임을 시사해준다고 하겠다.

Language: Korean

ISSN: 1229-8484, 2713-6515

Advanced Search