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Doctoral Dissertation

Barriers Contributing to the Minimal Participation of African American Parents in Their Children's Schools: A Qualitative Case Study of African American Parent Involvement in an Urban K–8 Elementary School in Minnesota

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

African American community, African Americans, Americas, North America, Early childhood education - Parent participation, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Parent participation, Parent-teacher relationships, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This research is a case study of African American parent involvement at a urban Montessori school in Minnesota. African American parents at this school have had limited involvement in conferences, PTSO meetings, school activities, and on the Site-Based Leadership Team. An examination of the literature was made to investigate the influences on African American parents when they make decisions about their parental involvement. This research covered the historical background, theoretical background, implications, racial barriers, and strategies that increased African American parent involvement. An ethnography was designed to gather data from 9 mothers of African American students. These parents provided information about their backgrounds and their experiences with the school. Staff at the school (6) were interviewed as to their experiences with African American parent involvement. The results of the study offer findings on attitudes, perceptions, needs and ideas for improving African American parent involvement at any school.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2000

Article

A Comparison of Reading and Math Achievement for African American Third Grade Students in Montessori and Other Magnet Schools

Available from: JSTOR

Publication: Journal of Negro Education, vol. 86, no. 4

Pages: 439-448

Academic achievement, African American community, African Americans, Americas, Comparative education, Lower elementary, Mathematics - Academic achievement, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, Reading - Academic achievement, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori programs are expanding in public schools, serving a large proportion of African American students. Although recent Montessori research has focused on diverse public school populations, few studies have examined outcomes for African American students at the lower elementary level. This quasi-experimental study compares reading and math achievement for African American third grade students in public Montessori and other magnet schools in a large, urban district in North Carolina. Scores from end-of-grade state tests of reading and math are compared using a multivariate analysis of covariance. No significant difference in math scores was identified, but students in Montessori schools scored significantly higher in reading. This suggests that Montessori lower elementary instruction may be beneficial for African American students.

Language: English

DOI: 10.7709/jnegroeducation.86.4.0439

ISSN: 0022-2984

Doctoral Dissertation

Evaluating the Effectiveness of Montessori Reading and Math Instruction for Third Grade African American Students in Urban Elementary Schools

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

African American children, African American community, Americas, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Improving academic achievement for students of color has long been the subject of debate among advocates of education reform (Anyon, 2013; Breitborde & Swiniarski, 2006; Payne, 2008). Some scholars have advocated for the Montessori method as an alternative educational approach to address some chronic problems in public education (Lillard, 2005; Murray, 2011, 2015; Torrance, 2012). Montessori programs are expanding in public schools (National Center for Montessori in the Public Sector, 2014c) at a time when the American public school population is more racially diverse than ever before (Maxwell, 2014). A review of the literature reflects a lack of consensus about the efficacy of Montessori elementary instruction for students of color in general, and lack of attention to outcomes for African American students specifically (Dawson, 1987; Dohrmann, Nishisda, Gartner, Lipsky, & Grimm, 2007; Lopata, Wallace, & Finn, 2005; Mallet & Schroeder, 2015). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of reading and math instruction for third grade African American students in public Montessori, traditional, and other school choice settings, using end-of-grade standardized test scores from a large, urban district in North Carolina. Stratified sampling was used to select demographically similar traditional and magnet schools for comparison. Group mean reading and math test scores were compared using factorial MANCOVA and MANOVA procedures. African American students at grade three were found to perform at significantly higher levels in both reading and math in public Montessori schools than in traditional schools. No statistically significant difference was found in math achievement between African American third grade students in public Montessori and other magnet programs, although the Montessori group did achieve at significantly higher levels in reading. This suggests that the Montessori method can be an effective pedagogy for African American students, particularly in reading. Based on these results, recommendations are provided for policy, practice, and future research.

Language: English

Published: Charlotte, North Carolina, 2016

Report

Reading and Math Achievement for African American Lower Elementary Students in Public Montessori Programs

Available from: National Center for Montessori in the Public Sector (NCMPS)

Academic achievement, African American community, African Americans, Americas, Arithmetic - Achievement, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Lower elementary, Mathematics - Achievement, Montessori method of education, North America, Public Montessori

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Abstract/Notes: As Montessori programs in public schools expand, Montessori education is becoming available to a more diverse population of American students than ever before. Students of color have a significant presence in public Montessori schools; over a quarter of students in whole-school public Montessori programs are African American. As these programs grow, researchers have increasingly directed their attention to demonstrating that Montessori works in public schools; however, few studies have examined outcomes for African American students at the lower elementary level, when critical reading and math skills are being established. This study sought to answer the question, how effectively does Montessori instruction promote achievement for African American third grade students in reading and math, compared to similar traditional schools and other public school choice programs?

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., 2016

Article

Americans Are Given Praise By Educator

Available from: California Digital Newspaper Collection

Publication: Los Angeles Herald (Los Angeles, California)

Pages: 1

Americas, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: "AMERICANS ARE GIVEN PRAISE Of EDUCATOR. With the intention of establishing four great Montessori schools in California, Dr. Maria Montessori, founder of the educational system that bears her name and world famous for her intellectual achievements, today declared that Americans are more fitted for the work of advancing educational work than any other people. Dr. Montessori is established at the Maryland hotel, Pasadena, where she will make her headquarters during her visit here. One of her schools will be in Pasadena, one in Los Angeles, one in San Diego and the other in San Francisco, and all who attend to learn the famous Montessori technique will be sent from one to the other institution, to avoid routine and bo,t ways. AMERICANS PRAISED "Americans seem more interested In their young than do people of other countries, ’ Madame Montessori declared, through her interpreter, "and they are also more alert. It Is for these reasons that they embrace and develope more quickly what Is for the child's benefit. "My system Is still too new to show positive results," she continued, “but It Is founded on the desire to secure the same Justice for the child that the adult would have, and to d&relop only what Is good In child nature. CHILD BORN GOOD "A child Is born Into the world good. What it develops of wrong doing Is taught It by adults. If left to follow Its original instincts and desires it would be and do only good. 'By encouraging a child to know the Joy of right doing It will never want to do wrong. If a child's parents and teachers never give It wrong precepts It will not be guilty of wrong doing, for the Innocence of child nature is Ignorant of evil till that Is taught from the outside.'"

Language: English

Article

Immersion and Identity: Experiences of an African American Preschool Child

Available from: International Journal of Multicultural Education

Publication: International Journal of Multicultural Education, vol. 12, no. 2

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Bilingualism, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This article explores the benefits and challenges of a Spanish language immersion preschool from the perspective of a non-Spanish speaking African American family.  Data explored include the decision to enroll, reactions from peers and family, home-school communication issues, language development, and family involvement.  In addition, recommendations for families considering this bilingual option are considered. The primary data used for this article come from 127 journal entries written by the mother of the child from the beginning of the preschool admissions process until the end of preschool.

Language: English

DOI: 10.18251/ijme.v12i2.306

ISSN: 1934-5267

Article

Movement and the African Child: A Practice Going Astray

Available from: African Journals Online

Publication: African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences, vol. 14

Pages: 41-50

Africa

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Abstract/Notes: Movement is life and the power for growth and development for healthy lifestyle. Poor motion or inactivity is the basis for poor development in children and morbidity and mortality in adulthood. As children grow, it is expected that certain developmental dimensions such as physical, socio-emotional and cognitive will develop. These dimensions form a very important aspect of the human life and need to be nurtured to develop appropriately. One of the means through which these dimensions could be nurtured is through body movement involving locomotive and non-locomotive motions. For proper development children need to be taken through conscious steps that will help their all-round development which primarily has been part of African communal settings for cultural integration and development. Era of technology has brought several challenges facing the active lifestyle of African Children thereby predisposing them to sedentary living and its disease risks. Some of these include mass movement from rural setting to urban settlements, use of technology and also social media, fear of the environment and security issues amongst others. There is the need to appraise the cultural effect of technology on active lifestyle of African children and reactivate a balance between technology and re-integration of cultural mediums of training and development in children’s education. To promote adequate physical movement among children, curriculum should integrate healthy cultural/physical activities in the school, and parent should encourage their children to do domestic activities and reduce the use of electronic gadgets such as electronic games, TV and labour saving devices.

Language: English

DOI: 10.4314/ajesms.v14i0

ISSN: 2508-1128

Article

Learn Montessori Method: Sixty-seven of the 87 Enrolled at Italian School Are Americans

Publication: New York Times (New York, New York)

Pages: C5

Americas, Europe, Italy, Montessori method of education, North America, Southern Europe, Trainings, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: ROME, March 15. -- The Montessori system of teaching is attracting so much attention in the United States that the American committee has enrolled forty-two new students to come to Rome for direct instruction under Dr. Maria Montessori herself, making altogether a class of eighty-seven, of whom sixty-seven are Americans.

Language: English

ISSN: 0362-4331

Article

Nurturing the Child's Spirit through Literature: An African-American Resource Guide

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 29, no. 1

Pages: 26–31

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Language: English

Article

Predominantly Black Institutions and Public Montessori Schools: Reclaiming the “Genius” in African American Children

Available from: De Gruyter

Publication: Multicultural Learning and Teaching, vol. 13, no. 1

Pages: Article 20170007

, Montessori approach

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Abstract/Notes: There are more than 22,000 Montessori schools in over 100 countries worldwide. Beginning in the 1950s the American Montessori movement was primarily a private pre-school movement. There are more than 5,000 schools in the United States; over 500 of these are public. Montessori schools are an increasingly popular choice in the U.S. for public school districts looking to improve their educational outcomes. Predominantly Black Institutions (PBIs) can play a pivotal role by integrating Montessori education within their teacher preparation programs. As the demand for Montessori education increases there will be a need for more highly-qualified, culturally and linguistically diverse teachers who have the appropriate credentials and can implement the Montessori approach. Scientific research confirms that children who attend Montessori schools are advantaged academically, socially and emotionally. Communities such as Milwaukee and Chicago are now implementing Montessori education through public schools as part of school reform efforts making the educational approach more accessible to African American children.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1515/mlt-2017-0007

ISSN: 2161-2412

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