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1791 results

Article

The Effect of Montessori Method on Teaching Cultural and Creative Arts in Primary Schools in Zaria, Nigeria

Available from: African Journals Online

Publication: Journal of Research in National Development, vol. 15, no. 1

Africa, Nigeria, Sub-Saharan Africa, West Africa, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: The Effect of the Montessori Method on teaching was investigated among children to discover their artistic development in Zaria, Kaduna State. The problem of the study is that the Montessori Method on teaching cultural and creative arts is not adequately explored in the primary schools, while other teaching methods used, do not bring out the full potentials of children’s artistic capabilities. Thus the study attempted to find out if the Montessori Method has effect on children’s artistic development. The aim of the study is to explore the effect of the Montessori Methods on the development of children’s creativity. Quasi experimental design was used for analyzing the instruments. A drawing test was administrated to the children using the Montessori Method of teaching; a semi-structured interview was also administered to the teachers. Total of 1,030 pupils (boys and girls) in primary schools from randomly selected schools were involved in the study. The data collected was analyzed using simple t-test, ANOVA and chi-square. The method of teaching was assessed on children’s developmental stages in creative artistic development between pre-schematic stage, schematic stage and gang stage. The findings revealed that the Montessori Method on Teaching had a positive effect on the Children’s artistic development and performance in the primary schools in Zaria. The pupils had a general positive and enthusiastic attitude towards culture and creative arts. This shows that when children are given the opportunity and enough art materials to express themselves, they would be able to display their different characteristics. The Montessori Method of teaching was better adopted than the conventional teaching methods used on the development of the creative artistic abilities of Children in the primary schools.

Language: English

ISSN: 1596-8308

Doctoral Dissertation

An Exploratory Study on the Effectiveness of Montessori Constructs and Traditional Teaching Methodology as Change Agents to Increase Academic Achievement of Elementary Black Students

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Academic achievement, African American children, African American community, Americas, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Black students consistently underachieve academically in comparison to White students. To minimize the achievement gap between Black students and White students, some experts advocate the use of differentiated instruction as an alternative methodology to teach underachieving students. Differentiated instruction is predicated on teaching students based on their learning abilities and/or learning preferences. The differentiated instructional model examined in this study combined traditional teaching methodology with specific Montessori stage two and stage three constructs. This exploratory qualitative study examined the impact that Montessori constructs combined with traditional teaching methods had on academic achievement of Black students in grades four and five in an inner city school in Dallas County, Texas. The study further explored the sample’s perceptions of and preferences for the combined teaching methodology. The sample group had been exposed to the differentiated teaching model evaluated in the study. Disaggregated 2007 and 2008 TAKS results from the Texas Education Agency were obtained to compare the school’s fourth and fifth grade Black students’ achievement to their cohort groups in the district and in the state. The TAKS data comparisons found variability in performance among the groups in each of the subject areas assessed by TAKS. Qualitative data from a Likert Scale, multiple choice questions, questionnaires, written essay, and interviews were obtained from the participants to examine the students’ perceptions of and preferences for the combined teaching methodology. Data responses were analyzed and themes were developed to determine black students’ preferences for teaching, learning, and factors that contribute to learning. The findings of this study imply that future use of a differentiated instructional model that combines traditional teaching methodology and specific Montessori constructs and principles might be effective in improving Black student achievement.

Language: English

Published: Minneapolis, Minnesota, 2009

Article

Mario Casotti, Il metodo Montessori e il metodo Agazzi [The Montessori Method and the Agazzi Method] (Book Review)

Available from: Université Caen Normandie

Publication: Pour l'ère nouvelle: revue internationale d'èducation nouvelle, vol. 13, no. 99

Pages: 187-188

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Abstract/Notes: book review

Language: French

Doctoral Dissertation

The Relationship Between Self-Concept and Stress of Elementary School Teachers Using Traditional and Montessori Methods of Teaching

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between self-concept and perceived levels of stress in the teaching profession at the elementary school level. The subjects of the study were teachers from two communities--Romulus, Michigan and Buffalo, New York. The subjects were chosen by the schools in which they taught and by the methods of teaching which they used. One-half of the total number of the subjects used traditional methods of teaching and one-half of the total number of the subjects used the Montessori Method of teaching. The responses of these teachers were gathered during the 1981 winter school term. The instruments used to gather the data for the study were the Tennessee Self Concept Scale, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, and a personal data questionnaire. The levels of self-concept of the subjects were taken as indicated by the means of the total positive scores of the Tennessee Self Concept Scale. The levels of the subjects' perceived stress were taken as indicated by the means from the Maslach Burnout Inventory in the areas of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal achievement. Pearson product-moment correlations were found to determine if a significant relationship existed between self-concept and the perceived stress of the subjects. Demographic data from the questionnaire were used to divide the subjects into categories which were investigated for significant differences. One way analyses of variance were performed of the self-concept and stress means of the categories to determine if significant differences existed. Statistical significance was chosen at the 0.05 alpha level. For the thirteen null hypotheses formulated and tested, it was concluded that the subjects indicating higher self-concept means, as measured by the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale, also indicated lower stress means, as indicated on the Maslach Burnout Inventory, in the areas of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, and higher means in the area of personal achievement. Null hypotheses formulated indicating no significant differences of stress or self-concept when the subjects were categorized by teaching methods, years of formal education, number of years of teaching experience, classroom racial dominance, number of students in the classroom, or marital status were all accepted. No significant differences were found at the 0.05 alpha level. The subjects of this study were shown to be similar in life style, education, and work environments. Further studies might bring to light differences if more varied teachers, teaching methods, and levels of education were taken into consideration. Replication of the study may also provide valuable information if performed with subjects from independent schools. A search for areas which the teachers feel are stress producing may also contribute to significant research.

Language: English

Published: Columbus, Ohio, 1981

Book Section

Perché contrapporre le Agazzi alla Montessori? [Why contrast Agazzi with Montessori?]

Book Title: Pietro Pasquali, le Agazzi e la riforma del fröbelismo in Italia

Pages: 153-154

Agazzi method of teaching - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Aldo Agazzi - Philosophy, Comparative education, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Rosa Agazzi - Philosophy

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Language: Italian

Published: Roma: Armando, 1962

Book Section

Maria Montessori en Inde: Adoption et Adaptation d’une Méthode Pédagogique [Maria Montessori in India: Adoption and Adaptation of a Pedagogic Method]

Available from: OpenEdition Books

Book Title: L’Inde et l’Italie: Rencontres intellectuelles, politiques et artistiques [India and Italy: Intellectual, political and artistic encounters]

Pages: 245-285

Asia, India, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: In this article I focus on the impact of the Maria Montessori’s pedagogical method during the years of her work in South Asia (1939-1946; 1947-1949). The genesis of this research started in the late 1980s during the years of my fieldwork in Madras (today Chennai), when I was amazed to find a large number of “Montessori” schools in that city. Certainly, they were many more than in Italy, and in Rome itself, where Maria Montessori founded the first “House of Children” on the 6th January 1907. Thus, out of mere curiosity I started to enquire about the reasons of such “implantation”. Soon I came to know that Maria Montessori (1870-1952) and her son, Mario Montesano Montessori (1898-1982), from 1939 till 1949, spent almost ten years in India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. In all those countries they collaborated and interacted with local pedagogists, by also training hundreds of children and more than thousand students and teachers to the homonimous “Montessori” pedagogical method. India, after Italy, was also the country where Maria Montessori spent the longest period of her life. After relating to the major events of her personal life as well as her scientific and social engagements as psychiatrist, pedagogist, outspoken feminist and antifascist, I deal here with the adoption and adaptation of her pedagogical method in South Asia. Finally, I tackle the influence of the local educational systems and cultural practices on Maria Montessori herself and on her own method’s further development. Due to such a synergic encouter and interaction, today India is one of the most dynamic and prestigeous international centers for the “Montessori” pedagogical method teachers’ training.,Dans cet article, j’étudie en particulier l’impact de la méthode pédagogique de Maria Montessori durant ses années en Asie du Sud (1939-1946, 1947-1949). La genèse de cette recherche a débuté à la fin des années 1980, quand j’ai été étonnée de trouver à Madras (Chennai) un si grand nombre d’écoles Montessori au cours de mon long terrain dans cette ville. Certes, elles étaient beaucoup plus nombreuses que celles présentes en Italie, et plus qu’à Rome même, où Maria Montessori fonda la première Maison des Enfants le 6 janvier 1907. Ainsi, par simple curiosité, je commençai à m’enquérir des raisons d’une telle « implantation ». Bientôt, j’ai réalisé que Maria Montessori (1870-1952) et son fils, Mario Montesano Montessori (1898-1982), avaient de 1939 à 1949, séjourné près de dix ans en Inde, au Pakistan et au Sri Lanka. Dans tous ces pays, ils ont collaboré et interagi avec les pédagogues locaux, en formant également des centaines d’enfants et plus de mille élèves et enseignants à la méthode pédagogique « Montessori ». L’Inde, après l’Italie, était aussi le pays où Maria Montessori a passé la plus longue période de sa vie. Après avoir évoqué les grands événements de sa vie personnelle ainsi que ses engagements scientifiques et sociaux en tant que psychiatre, pédagogue, féministe et antifasciste, je traite ici de l’adoption et de l’adaptation de sa méthode pédagogique en Asie du Sud. Enfin, j’analyse l’influence des systèmes éducatifs locaux et des pratiques culturelles sur Maria Montessori elle-même et sur le développement ultérieur de sa propre méthode. Grâce à cette rencontre et à cette interaction synergiques, l’Inde est aujourd’hui l’un des centres internationaux les plus dynamiques et les plus prestigieux pratiquant la méthode pédagogique Montessori.

Language: French

Published: Paris, France: OpenEdition Books, 2018

ISBN: 978-2-7132-3154-4

Series: Purushartha

Article

L'Opposizione di Aldo Agazzi al Montessorismo: Due Lettere dell'Estate 1951 [Aldo Agazzi's Opposition to Montessori: Two Letters from the Summer of 1951]

Available from: Torrossa

Publication: Annali di storia dell'educazione e delle istituzioni scolastiche, vol. 27

Pages: 243-257

Agazzi method of teaching - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Aldo Agazzi - Biographic sources, Aldo Agazzi - Philosophy, Comparative education, Correspondence, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Europe, Italy, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Southern Europe

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Abstract/Notes: Le due lettere che pubblichiamo sono conservate nell'Archivio Storico Missionarie della Scuola, Roma (e, in fotocopia, nell'Archivio per la Storia dell'Educazione in Italia, Brescia1): si tratta della lettera manoscritta che la contessa Myriam Gallarati Scotti Agliardi inviò a madre Luigia Tincani, fondatrice delle Missionarie, allegandovi la copia dattiloscritta di un'altra lettera, che la contessa stessa aveva ricevuto dal dott. Silvio Gavazzeni. Sono due documenti significativi che testimoniano dell'impegno attivo di Aldo Agazzi nella lotta contro...

Language: Italian

ISSN: 1723-9672

Article

School Environment and Methods of Teaching as Correlates of Language Skills Achievement of Pre–Primary School Pupils in Edo State Nigeria

Available from: Asian Institute of Research

Publication: Education Quarterly Reviews, vol. 4, no. 3

Pages: 243-251

Africa, Comparative education, Montessori method of education, Nigeria, Sub-Saharan Africa, West Africa

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Abstract/Notes: The study investigated the effects of school environment and methods of teaching on language skills achievement of pre – primary school pupils in Edo State. It also investigated the interaction effects of Montessori and played methods and urban and rural environments on pupils' achievement in listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Three urban and three rural areas which were selected from two Local Government Areas (LGAs) were used for the study. Six pre - primary schools were purposively selected for the study. A total of 228 kindergartens 2 pupils intact classes were used for the study which lasted for eight weeks. The study was a pretest, posttest, quasi- experimental control group design with independent variables as methods and school location while achievement in Language Skills Achievement Test (LSAT) was the dependent variable. Descriptive statistics and Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) were used to analyze the data obtained while the Multiple Classification Analysis (MCA) was used as post-hoc test for further significance. Three research questions were answered with three hypotheses, tested at 0.05 level of significance. Results showed that the Montessori Method of teaching pre –primary pupils was more effective than the play method. Similarly, urban school pupils achieved higher than their rural counterparts. There was also a significant interaction effect of methods and school location on pupils' academic achievement in Language skills. It was therefore recommended that the Nigerian Government should adopt the Montessori Method as a dominant method of teaching pre – primary school pupils and that pre – primary school owners should provide materials adequately for teaching and learning.

Language: English

DOI: 10.31014/aior.1993.04.03.335

ISSN: 2621-5799, 2657-215X

Article

The Effect of Montessori Teaching Method on Self-Concept and Motivation in Elementary First- Grade Students of Tabriz

Available from: Journal of Instruction and Evaluation

Publication: Journal of Instruction and Evaluation / Amuzish va Arzishyabi, vol. 12, no. 45

Pages: 31-50

Asia, Iran, Middle East, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of teaching Montessori Method on self–concept and motivation of elementary first-grade students in Tabriz. Information was collected on the basis of semi-experimental pretest-posttest research with control group. The population consists of all elementary first grade male students of Tabriz which were 665 schools in 2015-2016 school years. The sample includes 40 primary school pupils (20 in the experimental group and students 20 in the control group) who were selected by multistage cluster random sampling. To collect data, self-motivation Liu, Wang and Parkyn’s questionnaire was used to assess self-concept and motivation for preschool and elementary school age groups. The Montessori method teaching sessions (40 sessions) were conducted on the experimental group and the control group was exposed to traditional and traditional education. After holding Montessori classes sessions and analyzing data with Covariance method, results showed that teaching Montessori Method has been effective on self-concept and motivation of elementary school students. And this method has been able to boost self-image and increase motivation in male students.

Language: Persian

DOI: 10.30495/JINEV.2019.665916

ISSN: 2345-6299, 2476-5627

Conference Paper

The Montessori Method in University Teaching

Available from: IATED Digital Library

14th International Technology, Education and Development Conference

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Abstract/Notes: “The child’s progress does not depend only on his age, but also on being free to look around him.” Maria Montessori. The Montessori Method of education was developed by Maria Montessori at the turn of the 20th century. The first book "Il Metodo della Pedagogia Scientifica applicato all' educazione infantile nelle Case dei Bambini” was published in Italy in 1909, and was soon translated into other languages. This educational philosophy and method has been used worldwide for more than a century, usually educating children from 3 to 12 years old. The proposal of the method includes: mixed age classrooms, freedom of movement within the classroom (a thoughtfully prepared and structured environment), or students´ freedom to choose activities. As Maria Montessori stated: “The essence of independence is to be able to do something for one’s self”. The method consistently seeks to stimulate children to learn voluntarily. Our aim in this paper is to extend the basic philosophy and underlying ideas of the Montessori Method to university classes, to improve outcomes in terms of engagement, motivation, maturity and critical thinking. Our initial hypothesis is that the non-traditional schooling approach of the Method could be positively strengthened with current advances in teaching techniques, such as flipped classrooms or technology-based teaching and learning.

Language: English

Published: Valencia, Spain: International Academy of Technology, Education and Development (IATED), 2020

Pages: 3861-3864

DOI: 10.21125/inted.2020.1079

ISBN: 978-84-09-17939-8

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