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Article

We in Our Turmoil: Theological Anthropology Through Maria Montessori and the Lives of Children

Available from: The University of Chicago Press Journals

Publication: The Journal of Religion, vol. 95, no. 3

Pages: 318-336

Feminism, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Spirituality

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Abstract/Notes: A few decades ago, a small stone of concern about whom theology excludes began rolling through the field of theology. It gained momentum as it gathered questions, including important ones in theological anthropology: What is the significance of the fact that almost all preserved writings pondering what it means to be human originate from monastic—and often privileged—men? And then: How might theological anthropology look different if authored by and attentive to different bodies? Various feminists and liberationists have identified the way patriarchy, whiteness, and power have determined theological discussion, and slowly mainstream theology has opened to these concerns. But there is another class of humans whose bodies have been insufficiently acknowledged in theological discourse: children. This neglect is especially grievous if Maria Montessori is right that children name not just one group of humanity among others, nor a phase on the path to adulthood, but an entire pole of humanity, one that must be kept in balance with the adult. By her lights, the child and adult are not just successive phases in an individual life but are “two different forms of human life, going on at the same time, and exerting upon one another reciprocal influence.” If childhood constitutes a “form of human life” rather than simply incomplete human life or a transitional phase preparing for adulthood, then the dearth of serious theological reflection on children should alarm scholars as a woeful imbalance in theological anthropology. In what follows, I continue the work of feminist and liberationist theologians by noting the importance of children to theological reflection. I do so, in particular, by establishing Montessori as a figure worthy of theological consideration. She did not profess to be a theologian, but Montessori’s observations of children can help us articulate a supple theological anthropology that offers a sophisticated and persuasive approach to original sin despite initial impressions. Her images of original sin depict a chain connecting the sin of Eden to the sin of Calvary to those neglecting “the least of these,” as she makes plain the way we are responsible for a fallenness that is yet beyond us. Montessori’s remarks on the nature and Christ-likeness of children advance a doctrine of original sin that helps to make sense of the darkness in the world even as she identifies sources of hope within it.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1086/681109

ISSN: 0022-4189

Article

Anthropology and Education Business: Areas of Application, Approaches and Methodologies

Available from: International Journal of Business Anthropology

Publication: International Journal of Business Anthropology, vol. 2, no. 2

Pages: 102-116

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Abstract/Notes: The present study examines the convergence between anthropology and education business giving rise to the field of anthropology of education. The early works of Hewett, Boas and Montessori paved the way for the foundations of the application of anthropological contents and methods to the study and practices of educative processes and systems for better understanding and improvement of learning. School settings and classroom life provide relevant environment for anthropological inquiries. The application of anthropological contents and methods in various aspects of the study of education is significant. The business function of education in terms of the leadership and management of human, material and financial resources for optimal outcomes calls for anthropological insights and underpinnings in educational systems. Anthropological concepts and principles are applied in the areas of the foundations of education, curriculum development, culture studies, classroom interactions, multicultural education, business education, policy implementations, educational research and educational administration. Ethnographic methods have greatly contributed to the understanding of complex educational issues and challenges. Ethnographic methods of grounded theory, documentary content analysis, and action research are employed to study educational problems through the use of the techniques of purposive sampling, interview, observation, constant comparison, triangulations, key incident, narration, interpretive stance, and other tools of data gathering, interpretation and analysis.

Language: English

DOI: 10.33423/ijba.v2i2.1184

ISSN: 2155-6237

Article

Montessori as a School Reform Alternative Reflecting Biblical Anthropology

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Journal of Research on Christian Education, vol. 29, no. 3

Pages: 307-327

Americas, Educational change, Montessori method of education, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Today’s education has three impediments to meaningful and sustainable educational reform; first, the lack of precise and accurate anthropology of learners; second, dilemma between constructivism-leading academy and behaviorism-dominating classrooms; third, the lack of philosophy of education in theory and practice. The Montessori system was built upon the Christian theological anthropology, which uncovers that the main source of failure in our education is humanity’s original sin and sins preventing us from fulfilling the Imago Dei or the reciprocating self. This article highlights why the Montessori method is a feasible school reform model by briefly examining Montessori’s anthropology centering on Imago Dei, teacher’s respect for the child resulting in education through being and embodiment, and systematized teacher-training system.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/10656219.2020.1841049

ISSN: 1065-6219

Book

Pedagogical Anthropology

Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Maria Montessori - Speeches, addresses, etc., Maria Montessori - Writings, Montessori method of education, Observation (Educational method)

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Language: English

Published: London: Heinemann, 1913

Edition: [1st English ed.]

Book Section

Maria Montessori fra Antropologia, Psicologia e Modernismo [Maria Montessori Between Anthropology, Psychology and Modernism]

Book Title: La Cura dell'Anima in Maria Montessori: l'Educazione Morale, Spirituale e Religiosa dell'Infanzia [Care of the Soul in Maria Montessori: Moral, Spiritual and Religious Education of Childhood]

Pages: 8-37

Europe, Italy, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Southern Europe, Spirituality

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Language: Italian

Published: Rome, Italy: Fefè Editore, 2011

ISBN: 978-88-95988-34-4

Article

The Anthropology of Montessori: Centered Around Life

Publication: Montessori Kyōiku [Montessori Education], no. 30

Pages: 61-69

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Language: Japanese

ISSN: 0913-4220

Article

Pedagogical Anthropology [book review]

Available from: HathiTrust

Publication: Yale Review, vol. 3, no. 4

Pages: 840-841

Americas, Book reviews, North America, Spirituality, United States of America

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Language: English

ISSN: 0044-0124, 1467-9736

Book

Some Remarks on the Anthropology of Montessori Education

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Language: English

Published: Amsterdam: Association Montessori Internationale, 1965

Book

Pedagogical Anthropology

Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Maria Montessori - Speeches, addresses, etc., Maria Montessori - Writings, Montessori method of education, Observation (Educational method)

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Language: English

Published: London: Heinemann, 1914

Edition: [2nd edition]

Article

The Historical Background of the Norm-Concept in Montessori's Pedagogical Anthropology

Publication: Montessori Kyōiku [Montessori Education], no. 9

Pages: 32-41

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Language: Japanese

ISSN: 0913-4220

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