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228 results

Article

Paying Attention to Attention: Brain Development and the Critical Period of Focused Attention and Concentration

Publication: Infants and Toddlers, vol. 12, no. 3

Pages: 5–10, 17–20

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Language: English

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Challenging the Gaze: The Subject of Attention and a 1915 Montessori Demonstration Classroom

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: Educational Theory, vol. 54, no. 3

Pages: 281-297

Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - History, North America, Panama-Pacific International Exposition (1915, San Francisco, California), United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The child's attention, how this attention is reasoned about, and how attention works as a surface for pedagogical intervention are central to understanding modern schooling. This article examines attention as an object of knowledge related to the organization and management of individuals. I address what we might learn about attention by studying one specific Montessori classroom, the glasswalled public demonstration set up at the 1915 San Francisco World's Fair. The pedagogy of attention on display and the spectatorship of the classroom provide an opportunity to rethink how power and subjectivity play in the formation of human attractions. I argue that thinking through Montessori offers important and relevant suggestions for present-day examinations of attention. The 1915 demonstration classroom can help us theorize the relation of attention to normalizing and governmentalizing practices. This specific study of how attention operates in one locale has implications for tactile learning theories and for the analytics of power to be used in studies of attention. -- ERIC

Language: English

DOI: 10.1111/j.0013-2004.2004.00020.x

ISSN: 0013-2004, 1741-5446

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Challenging the Gaze: The Subject of Attention and a 1915 Montessori Demonstration Classroom (Bilingual edition: English/Portuguese)

Available from: Cadernos de História da Educação

Publication: Cadernos de História da Educação, vol. 15, no. 1

Pages: 166-189

Americas, North America, Panama-Pacific International Exposition (1915, San Francisco, California), United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The child's attention, how this attention is reasoned about, and how attention works as a surface for pedagogical intervention are central to understanding modern schooling. This article examines “attention” as an object of knowledge related to the organization and management of individuals. I address what we might learn about attention by studying one specific Montessori classroom, the glass-walled public demonstration set up at the 1915 San Francisco World's Fair. The pedagogy of attention on display and the spectatorship of the classroom provide an opportunity to rethink how power and subjectivity play in the formation of human attractions. I argue that thinking through Montessori offers important and relevant suggestions for present-day examinations of attention. The 1915 demonstration classroom can help us theorize the relation of attention to normalizing and governmentalizing practices. This specific study of how attention operates in one locale has implications for tactile learning theories and for the analytics of power to be used in studies of attention.

Language: Portuguese, English

DOI: 10.14393/che-v15n1-2016-6

ISSN: 1982-7806

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

La polarización de la atención y las armas de distracción masiva / Polarization of attention and mass arms of distraction

Available from: Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

Publication: RELAdEI (Revista Latinoamericana de Educación Infantil), vol. 3, no. 3

Pages: 97-108

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Abstract/Notes: María Montessori empezó a descubrir la infancia a partir de la capacidad que el niño pequeño tiene de polarizar su atención. En la base de la capacidad de atención están los poderes de la mente absorbente que hoy los estudios de la neurociencia han descubierto con indiscutibles pruebas empíricas. Su pedagogía puede definirse como pedagogía de la atención: atención hacia el niño, atención hacia los detalles, atención hacia la atención del niño. Los estudios sobre la capacidad de atención y sobre la relación entre la atención y la memoria confirman que es necesario proporcionar a los niños la posibilidad de concentrarse durante largo tiempo en una actividad (trabajo) con materiales adecuados y sin interrumpirlos jamás. Actualmente existen múltiples y variadas tecnologías de la información que fragmentan y fomentan una tendencia a la atención superficial en los niños y en los jóvenes. Por esto, la propuesta educativa y didáctica montessoriana resulta más actual hoy que al inicio del pasado siglo. [Montessori began her discovery of childhood starting from the polarization of attention in young children. Behind attention are the powers of the absorbent mind that neuroscience today is discovering with irrefutable empirical evidence. It is the pedagogy of attention: attention to the child, attention to the details, focus on the attention of the child. Studies on attention and the relationship between attention and memory have confirmed that it is necessary to give children the opportunity to focus on a specific activity for a long time using suitable materials, without interruptions. Today, there are many technologies that break up the attention of children and young people. This is why Montessori education and teaching is more relevant today than at the beginning of the last century.]

Language: Spanish

ISSN: 2255-0666

Article

Helping Children with Attentional Challenges in the Montessori Classroom: Introduction

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 42, no. 2

Pages: 263-285

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, Attention-deficit-disordered children, Children with disabilities, Inclusion, Montessori method of education, People with disabilities

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Abstract/Notes: Catherine Nehring Massie provides important contextual information in considering children with attentional challenges. She discusses the prevalence of attentional challenges in today's culture and the contributing factors. She gives a general overview of the spectrum of attentional challenges and some of the indicators in children. Her history of Montessori and work with children facing attentional challenges provides a clearer understanding to the individual details and definitions as it builds upon years of work and observation. Critical to her article and those that follow is the link she draws between concentration (attention) and human development: "Attention lays the foundation for concentrated work--normalization of the child's personality." By partnering Montessori with medical knowledge, fostering focus and attentional development can be better achieved. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Finding the Hook: Montessori Strategies to Support Concentration," October 6-9, 2016, in Columbia, MD.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Attention

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 41, no. 3

Pages: 367-371

Maria Montessori - Writings

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Abstract/Notes: "The Advanced Montessori Method, Volume 1" was published in 1918 in English and is considered a seminal work along with "The Montessori Method." In the foreword to this book, Mario Montessori writes: "...the refulgent figure of the child, Dr. Montessori pointed out, who had found his own path to mental health, who spontaneously and joyfully had taken to learning at an early age, has caught the general attention anew." He refers to the immense power of auto-education and the dawning of a new science to bring a fuller understanding of all the traits of early childhood through observation including environment, attention, will, intelligence, and imagination. Attention refers to the stimulus that captures the child's focus or can be the attention propelled by an "internal impulse" or "spiritual hunger." It drives the child to repeat an exercise with attention fixed so intently from object to object that the initial learning brings a new kind of intense engagement. [Reprinted from "The Advanced Montessori Method, Volume 1" (1918). Kalakshetra Press (1965): 123-130. Reprinted with permission from Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Doctoral Dissertation

Teacher Beliefs, Attitudes, and Expectations Towards Students with Attention Disorders in Three Schools in the United Kingdom's Independent School System

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, Attention-deficit-disordered children, Children with disabilities, England, Europe, Inclusive education, Northern Europe, Northern Ireland, Perceptions, Scotland, Teachers - Attitudes, United Kingdom

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Abstract/Notes: Scope and method of study. The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate the connection between the beliefs, attitudes, and expectations teachers exhibit towards students who have attention challenges in three independent schools in England and the pathognomonic-interventionist continuum as identified by Jordan-Wilson and Silverman (1991), which identifies, along a scale, where teachers' beliefs lie. Teachers' sense of efficacy as they meet individual student needs was also explored as was what educators in these schools, who have limited, if any, recourse to special education assistance, do to support students who display the characteristics of attention deficit. The pathognomonic-interventionist continuum and Bandura's (1977) construct of self-efficacy were the lenses used to focus the research. The study records participants' responses and reflections about the phenomenon under study, describing what it is they do, how they perceive their responsibility towards their students, and how they support each other. Findings and conclusions. Data compiled from a sample of 10 teachers and 3 head-teachers, were disaggregated to provide a picture of how participant teachers work with attentionally challenged children in selected English independent schools. The results provide evidence that teachers whose profile identifies them with the interventionist perspective present stronger senses of self-efficacy. They are prepared to undertake prereferral-type activities to determine where the student is experiencing difficulty and are then willing to manipulate the learning environment to meet individual student needs. Teachers in these schools perceive it as their professional obligation to design teaching scenarios to benefit all students. Teacher efficacy, their sense of their ability to positively influence their students' educational performance and achievement, is unrelated to years of experience or educational background, but is related to the beliefs which they hold.

Language: English

Published: Stillwater, Oklahoma, 2006

Article

Enacting Attention: Concentration and Shared Focus in Montessori Classrooms

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 24, no. 4

Pages: 18-20,22-26

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Concentration is a "sine qua non," a hallmark, of a Montessori Casa program. Yet, it happens that some children do not concentrate. They do not engage with the materials in the classic pattern of normalization. They are not challenged by ADD, ADHD, or a variant of sensory integration spectrum disorder. Instead of working alone, they prefer the company of others; they prefer to learn with others. One may wonder if their natural intelligence is interpersonal. Based on studies of brain development and findings from recent ethnographic research, this article describes a type of attention called "shared focus." Ethnographic research was conducted in Casa classrooms, located in four Montessori schools, during a 3-year period, beginning in 2008. The research involved observing classrooms and interviewing school staff, teachers, and children. "Children who do not concentrate" was a common concern raised by the teachers in those classrooms. A review of brain development research suggests concentration is a type of attention. Children may use a type of attention called shared focus when, for example, they laugh and run together on the playground, and when they leave their parents during morning arrival. Some children may also more naturally use this type of attention instead of concentration during the work period. (Contains 1 table.)

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Efficacy of Montessori Education in Attention Gathering Skill of Children

Available from: Academic Journals

Publication: Educational Research and Reviews, vol. 10, no. 6

Pages: 733-738

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Abstract/Notes: The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of Montessori education which is offered to upskill the attention gathering skill of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. In total fifteen preschooler participants, six girls and nine boys who are diagnosed with ADHD (7 of the children with ADHD, 8 with only AD), joined to this research. This is a research designed with pre-post test design study with a control group of experimental design. In this research with the aim of improving the attention gathering level; eye-hand coordination, development of tactile, visual and auditory senses and for improving their acquired distinctiveness “tactile boards, sound boxes, binomial cubes and color tablets” are used from Montessori materials. FTFK Attention test is applied to children before and after the intervention. After the training, when scores are compared, the significant improvement is seen in their post test scores.

Language: English

DOI: 10.5897/ERR2015.2080

ISSN: 1990-3839

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Effect of Fine Motor Skill Activities on Kindergarten Student Attention

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: Early Childhood Education Journal, vol. 35, no. 2

Pages: 103-109

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Abstract/Notes: This study explored the effect of fine motor skill activities on the development of attention in kindergarteners (n = 68) in five classes at a suburban public school in the Intermountain West through a pretest/posttest experimental group (n = 36) control group (n = 32) design. All children received the regular curriculum which included typical fine motor activities such as painting, coloring, writing, and play activities with small items. The treatment was a series of supplemental fine motor activities in which children used tongs, tweezers, and spoons to move small items. The assessment was the attention subtest of the Cognitive Assessment System (CAS) (Naglieri, J. A., & Das, J. P. (1997a). Cognitive assessment system. Itasca, IL: Riverside). A significant group × sex interaction with females positively responding to the treatment was found, suggesting that fine motor skill activities are effective in increasing female kindergartners’ attention. Further studies exploring effective materials for males and factors such as student choice and interest are needed.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s10643-007-0169-4

ISSN: 1082-3301, 1573-1707

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