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8 results

Article

Differentiating Language Arts in Belize

Available from: ERIC

Publication: Forum on Public Policy, vol. 5, no. 1

Pages: 14 p.

Americas, Belize, Central America, Language arts, Latin America and the Caribbean, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - History, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: There is limited amount of research that constitutes non-traditional curricula implemented within an institutionalized context of developing countries. An attempt is made in this project to gain a clearer understanding of a non-traditional early learning program within an orphanage campus setting of Ladyville, Belize, Central America. This program is supported through the Belizean Ministry of Education and the University of Belize. In 1996, a comprehensive literacy survey was conducted in Belize that indicated the functional literacy rate to be approximately 40 percent (Cornerstone, 2007). In addition, it is estimated within developing countries one person in four is illiterate (Terryn, 2006). Liberty Learning Centre (LLC) of Ladyville, Belize implemented non-traditional theoretical curricula reflecting the social-constructivist theory to early learning. The methodologies include: Pikler, Montessori and components of the Reggio Emilia philosophy. The staff of LLC discovered creative, innovative and strategic ways to differentiate traditional academic learning through a diverse non-traditional learning environment. Procedures: Responses from the administration, caregivers, teachers, staff and students were interpreted and documented through various means of audio/DVD/video recordings, photography, interviews and journals. In addition I used detailed anecdotal field notes that became pieces to the methodology for the project. Findings: Responses, thoughts, ideas and viewpoints were given by the administration, teachers, students and staff regarding the implementation of non-traditional curricula within an institutionalized and non-traditional learning environment of a developing country. Implication: An institutionalized and international socio-cultural perspective will extend early childhood education further through a qualitative ethnographic study in Belize. This project gives voice to the silent and voiceless.

Language: English

ISSN: 1556-763X, 1938-9809

Doctoral Dissertation

Emergent Voices from an Orphanage School in Belize, Central America

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

, Nontraditional education

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Abstract/Notes: An attempt is made in this study to gain a better understanding of a non-traditional early learning program in an orphanage school setting, located in Ladyville, Belize, Central America. The teaching staff of Liberty Children‘s Home (LCH) and Learning Centre (LLC) discovered innovative and strategic ways to differentiate traditional academic ways of early learning. The teaching approaches emulate a theoretical social-constructivist theory, implementing methodologies from Pikler, Montessori and Reggio Emilia. In 1996, a comprehensive literacy survey was conducted in Belize that indicated the functional literacy rate to be approximately 40 percent (Cornerstone, 2007). In addition, it is estimated one person in four in developing countries are illiterate (Terryn, 2006). This research site was approved and supported through Liberty Foundation, Ltd., charity of London, England and the Research Ethics Board (REB) from the University of Windsor, Ontario, Canada. This 17-week qualitative grounded theory (Glaser, 1997) study was conducted on site at LCH and LLC. Responses from the students and staff were documented and interpreted utilizing various anecdotal and observation field notes, journals, interviews, audio/DVD/video recordings and photography. The students and staff responded to the Belizean ways of implementing early learning curricula in the natural learning environment. The grounded theory study offers a rich description of cultural responses that extend early childhood education further from an institutionalized and international point of view.

Language: English

Published: Windsor, Ontario, Canada, 2010

Article

Perspectives in Early Childhood Education: Belize, Brazil, Mexico, El Salvador and Peru

Available from: ERIC

Publication: Forum on Public Policy, vol. 2012, no. 1

Pages: 1-27

Americas, Belize, Brazil, Central America, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, El Salvador, Latin America and the Caribbean, Mexico, Peru, South America, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Early childhood education (ECE) provision is becoming a growing priority. During the past twenty years, Latin America has shown a growing recognition in the provision of educational programs for young children, birth to age eight, is essential. Urban and rural populations intimated in 2009, that many countries utilizing equitable access to quality early childhood programs is often seen by policy makers as a means of achieving economic and political goals (United Nations, 2012). Unfortunately, a pre-occupation with economic and political goals may conflict with the provision of quality programming for young children. In a number of Latin American countries provisions for educating young children exist as intent to provide quality services. The continuing challenge is to finance, organize and regulate those well-meaning intentions. The objective of this article is two-fold. First, to describe national policy efforts that regulate the education of young children consistently. And, second, to reflect the status of early childhood education programming; and to examine the possibilities for the improvement of the quality and accessibility of an education for all young children. Five Latin American nations have been chosen for examination, including: Belize, Brazil, El Salvador, Mexico, and Peru. (Contains 4 tables.)

Language: English

ISSN: 1556-763X, 1938-9809

Article

Giving Liberty to the Children of Belize

Publication: Montessori International, vol. 79

Pages: 33–35

Americas, Belize, Central America, Latin America and the Caribbean, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

Article

From Alpha to Omega [Liberty Children's Home, Ladyville, Belize]

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 18, no. 3

Pages: 18-20

Americas, Belize, Central America, Latin America and the Caribbean, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: The Alpha point of the authors' life as a Montessori educator began in 1959, when he was a graduate student studying philosophy at Fordham University in the Bronx, New York. While studying the works of the great American philosopher William James, the author came across the writings of Maria Montessori and immediately became captivated by her insights concerning the development of the virtuous child through personal experiential learning. He wrote a paper comparing her observations with those of John Dewey and afterward set out to find an opportunity to place himself in some elementary school so he might observe and encourage this philosophical development of children. His teaching career began teaching Philosophy and Latin in a school in Greenwich, Connecticut to children from very privileged families. He then describes the omega point of his career as having been called to serve the very poorest of children housed in an orphanage in Ladyville, a small village in Belize, in Central America. As a veteran Montessorian, he had been asked to help the Liberty Children's Home in Ladyville build and equip a world-class Montessori school.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Creating a Unique Montessori School for Orphans [Liberty Children's Home, Belize]

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 29, no. 3

Pages: 25–28

Americas, Belize, Central America, Latin America and the Caribbean

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Language: English

Article

You Can Help: Building the Liberty Children's Home in Belize

Publication: Infants and Toddlers, vol. 9, no. 3

Pages: 14–15

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

Article

Each Child a Face of Joy [Liberty Children's Home, Belize]

Publication: Montessori NewZ, vol. 43

Pages: 15–16

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

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