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Article

TEP Listings

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 32, no. 1

Pages: 54-55

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Teacher education programs affiliated by the American Montessori Society provide comprehensive courses of study that prepare the adult learners of today to be the highly skilled, highly qualified Montessori teachers and leaders of tomorrow. ARIZONA ARIZONA MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Chandler KHALSA MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary II, Elementary I-II Tucson ARKANSAS ARKANSAS CENTER FOR MONTESSORI STUDIES Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Little Rock CALIFORNIA CAPITAL EDUCATION INSTITUTE Early Childhood Claremont COTTAGE MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood Fresno Additional Site: Lancaster EAST BAY MONTESSORI TRAINING Early Childhood Fremont FOUNTAINHEAD MONTESSORI ADULT EDUCATION Early Childhood Dublin MONTESSORI CENTER FOR TEACHER EDUCATION Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary II, Elementary I-II San Diego MONTESSORI HILLS ACADEMY TEACHER CERTIFICATION PROGRAM Early Childhood Chula Vista MONTESSORI INSTITUTE OF ADVANCED STUDIES Early Childhood Castro Valley MONTESSORI TEACHER ACADEMY Early Childhood Dana Point MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER/SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II San Leandro, San Mateo, Sunnyvale Additional Site: West Covina MONTESSORI TRAINING CENTER Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Shingle Springs UNIVERSITY MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM AT UC IRVINE Early Childhood Irvine COLORADO MONTESSORI EDUCATION CENTER OF THE ROCKIES Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II, Administrator Boulder DELAWARE DELAWARE INSTITUTE FOR MONTESSORI EDUCATION Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Hockessin MONTESSORI INSTITUTE FOR TEACHER EDUCATION Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Wilmington FLORIDA BARRY UNIVERSITY MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood, Elementary I-II Miami Shores DUHOVKA MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood, Elementary I-II Additional Site: Fernandina Beach MAITLAND MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Maitland MONTESSORI ACADEMY TRAINING INSTITUTE Early Childhood Pembroke Pines MONTESSORI TEACHER TRAINING INSTITUTE/MTTI Early Childhood Palmetto Bay ORLANDO MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION INSTITUTE Early Childhood Celebration PALM HARBOR MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER Early Childhood Tarpon Springs SUMMIT MONTESSORI TEACHER TRAINING INSTITUTE Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I Davie GEORGIA MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION INSTITUTE-ATLANTA Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Atlanta HAWAII CHAMINADE UNIVERSITY OF HONOLULU MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood Honolulu ILLINOIS MIDWEST MONTESSORI TEACHER TRAINING CENTER Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Evanston MONTESSORI HEARTLAND TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER Early Childhood Moline SETON MONTESSORI INSTITUTE Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Administrator Clarendon Hills INDIANA MONTESSORI TEACHER ACADEMY AT EDISON LAKES Early Childhood Mishawaka KENTUCKY GREATER CINCINNATI CENTER FOR MONTESSORI EDUCATION Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Covington MAINE MAINE MONTESSORI INSTITUTE Early Childhood Falmouth MARYLAND INSTITUTE FOR ADVANCED MONTESSORI STUDIES Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II, Administrator Silver Spring MARYLAND CENTER FOR MONTESSORI STUDIES Early Childhood Lutherville MONTGOMERY MONTESSORI INSTITUTE Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Rockville MASSACHUSETTS CAMBRIDGE MONTESSORI INSTITUTE Infant & Toddler Cambridge MONTESSORI ELEMENTARY TEACHER TRAINING COLLABORATIVE Elementary I, Elementary II, Elementary I-II Lexington MONTESSORI INSTITUTE - NEW ENGLAND Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Beverly NEW ENGLAND MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER Early Childhood Newton NORTHEAST MONTESSORI INSTITUTE Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Wenham MICHIGAN ADRIAN DOMINICAN MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION INSTITUTE Early Childhood Adrian MICHIGAN MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II, Elementary II Waterford MINNESOTA VIRGINIA MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER Early Childhood Additional Site: Excelsior MISSOURI HOPE MONTESSORI EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTE Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood St. Louis MONTANA MONTANA MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION INSTITUTE Early Childhood Kalispell NEBRASKA MID-AMERICA MONTESSORI TEACHER TRAINING INSTITUTE Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Omaha NEVADA MONTESSORI TRAINING OF SOUTHERN NEVADA Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Las Vegas NEW JERSEY MONTESSORI CENTER FOR TEACHER DEVELOPMENT Early Childhood Morristown MONTESSORI TEACHER TRAINING INSTITUTE OF MERCER COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE Early Childhood Robbinsville PRINCETON CENTER TEACHER EDUCATION Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II, Administrator Princeton WEST SIDE MONTESSORI SCHOOL TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Infant & Toddler Additional Site: Whitehouse Station NEW YORK BUFFALO MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood Clarence CENTER FOR MONTESSORI EDUCATION I NEW YORK Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Administrator New Rochelle WEST SIDE MONTESSORI SCHOOL TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II, Administrator New York City NORTH CAROLINA CENTER FOR MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION/NORTH CAROLINA Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Huntersville OHIO CINCINNATI MONTESSORI SECONDARY TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Secondary I, Secondary I-II Cincinnati COLUMBUS MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Columbus XAVIER UNIVERSITY MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Cincinnati OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA CITY UNIVERSITY MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood Oklahoma City OREGON MONTESSORI OF ALAMEDA TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Portland PENNSYLVANIA CHESTNUT HILL COLLEGE MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood Philadelphia PUERTO RICO INSTITUTO NUEVA ESCUELA Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II, Secondary I Rio Piedras SOUTH CAROLINA GULF COAST MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER Elementary I, Elementary I-II Additional Site: Charleston HOUSTON MONTESSORI CENTER Secondary I-II, Administrator Additional Site: Charleston LANDER UNIVERSITY MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood, Elementary II, Elementary I-II Greenwood NORTHEAST MONTESSORI INSTITUTE Early Childhood Additional Site: Mt. Pleasant SEACOAST CENTER FOR EDUCATION Elementary I, Elementary I-II Charleston TENNESSEE MONTESSORI TRAINING CENTER OF BRENTWOOD Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Brentwood TEXAS DALLAS MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Plano GULF COAST MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER Elementary I, Elementary I-II Houston HOUSTON MONTESSORI CENTER Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary II, Elementary I-II, Secondary I, Secondary I-II, Administrator Houston MONTESSORI DEVELOPMENT CENTER OF DFW Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Irving MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION INSTITUTE-HOUSTON Early Childhood Houston NORTH TEXAS MONTESSORI INSTITUTE Early Childhood Frisco SHELTON MONTESSORI TRAINING Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Dallas UTAH INSTITUTE FOR MONTESSORI INNOVATION AT WESTMINSTER COLLEGE Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary II, Elementary I-II, Administrator Salt Lake City VIRGINIA NORTHERN VIRGINIA MONTESSORI INSTITUTE Early Childhood Ashburn VIRGINIA CENTER FOR MONTESSORI STUDIES Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Richmond VIRGINIA MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER Early Childhood Chesapeake WASHINGTON MONTESSORI CENTER FOR TEACHER EDUCATION-WASHINGTON STATE Early Childhood Bellevue MONTESSORI EDUCATION INSTITUTE OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Bothell WISCONSIN UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN- RIVER FALLS MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II River Falls INTERNATIONAL BAISHAN MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION INSTITUTE Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Qingdao, CHINA BEIJING HEART & MIND MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Beijing, CHINA Early Childhood Additional Site: Yiwu, CHINA CADALIN GLOBAL EDUCATION Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Hsinchu City, TAIWAN CAPITAL COLLEGE Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Richmond, BC, CANADA CAPITAL EDUCATION INSTITUTE Early Childhood Additional Site: Nanning, CHINA CENTRE FOR ADVANCED MONTESSORI STUDIES-VANCOUVER Elementary I, Elementary I-II Vancouver, BC, CANADA CENTRO DE ENSEÑANZA MONTESSORI, A.C. Early Childhood Tijuana, BC, MEXICO CENTRO DE ENTRENAMIENTO MONTESSORI Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Monterrey, NL, MEXICO THE CHILDREN'S HOUSE MONTESSORI EDUCATION CENTER Early Childhood Beijing, CHINA DR. JUN INSTITUTE OF MONTESSORI EDUCATION Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Seoul, REPUBLIC OF KOREA DUHOVKA MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Prague, CZECH REPUBLIC ETONKIDS MONTESSORI TEACHER TRAINING ACADEMY Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Beijing, CHINA HOUSTON MONTESSORI CENTER Secondary I, Secondary I-II Additional Site: Prague, CZECH REPUBLIC INFINITY MONTESSORI ACADEMY OF HONG KONG Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, HONG KONG INTERNATIONAL MONTESSORI EDUCATION INSTITUTE Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Taichung City, TAIWAN INTERNATIONAL MONTESSORI TEACHING INSTITUTE Early Childhood Beijing, CHINA KOREAN INSTITUTE FOR MONTESSORI Early Childhood Seoul, REPUBLIC OF KOREA KOREAN MONTESSORI COLLEGE Early Childhood Seoul, REPUBLIC OF KOREA LMS MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood Windsor, ON, CANADA MONTESSORI INSTITUTE FOR TEACHER EDUCATION Early Childhood Additional Site: Istanbul, TURKEY MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER/SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA Infant & Toddler Additional Site: Taipei City, TAIWAN Early Childhood Additional Site: Kowloon Tong, HONG KONG NORTHEAST MONTESSORI INSTITUTE Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Additional Site: Chengdu, CHINA OKLAHOMA CITY UNIVERSITY MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood Additional Site: Taipei City, TAIWAN PALM HARBOR MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER Early Childhood Additional Site: Beijing, CHINA SHANGHAI MONTESSORI EDUCATION ACADEMY Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Administrator Shanghai, CHINA WEIMING MONTESSORI EDUCATION CENTRE Early Childhood Beijing, CHINA WEST SIDE MONTESSORI SCHOOL TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Infant & Toddler Additional Site: Beijing, CHINA

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

President Wilson's Daughter to Aid Mme. Montessori Show Her System

Available from: Chronicling America (Library of Congress)

Publication: The Sun (New York) (New York City, NY)

Pages: 6

Americas, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The Montessori movement, considered by many a radical departure from traditional educational methods, will receive new emphasis and publicity from the fact that visitors to the Panama-Pacific International Exposition will see during the months of August, September, October and November not only a demonstration of the Montessori system but will see it conducted by the talented woman herself. Associated with her will be Miss Margaret Wilson, daughter of the President, Dr. David Starr Jordan, chancellor of Leland Stanford Junior University, and other well known educators. The Montessori method has been summed up as 'freedom for development of the child under best conditions disturbing as little as possible but helping buy every means this development.' Any estimate of Mme. Montessori's work to be of practical value will involve a comparison between the Montessori method and that of the kindergarten, since the kindergarten is the only system of organizes educational work for young children that has so far received general recognition. In the middle of the last century the sensitive woman soul and philosophic mind of Froebel grasped the fundamental principle of development and say that the first six or seven years are the most important in the life of the individual. After years of study he embodied what he conceived to be the fundamental principles of the education of little children in what is known as the kindergarten, and his ideas of the best means for the application of these principles in his kindergarten program, materials and devices. The discovery of the kindergarten marked a new era in the history of the educational world. Though suppressed for years by government authority in Germany, and received with much suspicion elsewhere, the kindergarten has become an integral part of the public school system of many cities and States in our country. Its introduction into England was championed by Charles Dickens, and in America it found an advocate in the philosopher and educator Dr. William T. Harris. Concerning the kindergarten and the Montessori methods, Dr. P. P. Claxton, United States Commissioner of Education says: 'Though aims and principles are the same for both Froebel and Montessori, their different methods of approach have resulted in difference in emphasis, program and decides. For those who see no further than the form there is apparent conflict. Many cannot understand that the work of both Froebel and Montessori must finally lose each its distinctive characteristics in the larger whole of a more perfect knowledge of the nature of infancy and the means of educating young children.' It must be said of Dr. Montessori that she is first, last and always scientific in her work. Prolonged training in the sciences that relate to human life, vitalized by practical experience in their application to defective children, gave her a method which is the outcome of genius, training and experience. She swung into prominence, against her wish, in the following way: While serving as assistant doctor at the psychiatric clinic of the University of Rome, Italy, she founder herself differing from her colleagues in that she felt, as she says, 'that mental deficiency presented chiefly a pedagogic rather than mainly a medical problem.' The expression of these views in an address brought Dr. Montessori prominently before the Minister of Public Instruction, and her work from this on assumed a public character. Her belief that the methods employed with deficient children 'contained educational principles more rational than those in use and that if applied to normal children they would develop or set free their personality in a marvelous and surprising way,' became her controlling idea, and is the very heart of the Montessori system. The system of Mme. Montessori is indissolubly joined with her famous 'didactic material.' Among this will be found small wooden frames to which are attached pieces of cloth or leather on which are buttons and buttonholes, hooks and eyes, eyelets and lacing cords, and strings to be tied and untied. There are also boxes of cylindrical insets and other simple devices to develop 'man's mystery over nature.' Mme. Montessori is her best interpreter when she says, 'We are inclined to believe that children are like puppets and we wash them and feed them as if they were dolls. We do not stop to think that the child that does not do does not know how to do. Our duty is that of helping him to make a conquest of such useful acts as nature intended he should perform for himself. The mother who feeds her child without making the least effort to teach him to hold the spoon for himself and to try to find his mouth with it is not a wise mother. She treats her son as though he were a doll. We call an individual disciplined when he is master of himself and can regulate his own conduct when it shall be necessary to follow some rule of life. If any educational act is to be efficacious it is necessary rigorously to avoid the arrest of spontaneous movements and the imposition of arbitrary tasks. It is of course understood here that we do not speak of a useless or dangerous act; this must be suppressed, destroyed.' The Montessori doctrine is therefore in substance that the child's inner self or personalit cannot rightfully develop unless free to express itself undirected and unguided by another person. As a consequence Dr. Montessori insists that each child be allowed bodily freedom and have as much unhampered liberty of action as possible in order that he may fully express his inner life in outer activity. The classic illustration by which Dr. Montessori puts in concrete form her doctrine is the following: 'One day the children had gathered in a circle about a basin of water containing some floating toys. A little boy 2 1/2 years old had been left outside the circle. He drew near to the other children and tried to force his way among them, but he was not strong enough to do this. The expression of thought on his face was intensely interesting. His eyes then lighted upon a little chair and he had evidently made up his mind to place it behind the group of children and climb on it. As he began to move toward the chair, his face illuminated with hope, a teacher seized him in her arms, lifted him above the heads of the other children, showed him the basin of water, saying, 'Come poor little one you shall see too.' The child seeing the floating toys did not experience the joy that he was about to feel through conquering the obstacles with his own force. The teacher hindered the child in this case from educating himself. The little fellow was about to feel himself a conqueror, and instead he found himself held within two imprisoning arms impotent.' The now famous 'House of the Children' in Rome, under the patronage of Queen Margherita, faithfully reflects and demonstrates the Montessori principles and methods. It has been described as an old orphan asylum, whose gray outer walls give no idea of the two beautiful and luxuriant courtyards within. These latter are filled with beds of blossoming plans, and the pillars of the inner porch are covered with clinging vines. The schoolroom in which the class for the children is held opens with wide double doors into one of these lovely courtyards, where the children play during hours in which they are not engaged in their Montessori exercises. Miss Elizabeth Harrison, president of the National Kindergarten Union says of this 'House of the Children': 'On my first visit I found the children busy getting out the 'didactic material' with which they were to employ themselves for the next hour and a quarter. Some came forward to shake hands with me; some merely smiled and nodded and did not interrupt their work. All seemed busy, happy and free. I afterward saw as many as eighty visitors in the room where there were only a dozen children, but none of the children were in the least disturbed by or seemingly conscious of the presence of the visitors. Most of the children came from nearby tenement houses, yet even the youngest of them washed their own hands and faces, put on clean, neat calico aprons and looked as fresh and clean as children from well cared for homes.' Comparing the kindergarten and the Montessori systems, the following differences appear: The kindergarten stresses group activities, while the Montessori system emphasized almost exclusively the development of the individual. The kindergartners say that education in coordinating of muscles, the special training of the child's senses and all such phases of individual development are expected to come in the nursery. The Montessori system has no place for stories; the kindergartners are famous for them. Mme. Montessori objects to stories for young children on the theory that all activities of the mind are derived from the outside world and are dependent on sense impressions, and that therefore the child should be kept within the realm of his own personal experience until he is at least 7 or 8 years old. It is not necessary to add that two __ meet at this point of difference. The most remarkable features of the Montessori system, as well as one of its decided points of divergence from the kindergarten, lies in its ___ of definite attitude on religious training. Froebel, trained in an environment where instruction in religion is practically nationwide, says that while the child unconsciously manifests teh divine impuse within him he must follow it with conscious insights persisting in what he knows to do right and must needs have definite training of this kind. Montessori, on the other hand, with nuns as her assistants and attendants in her 'House of the Children,' acknowledges the importance of religious training for little children, 'but confesses that as yet it is an unsolved problem to her.' Miss Harrison, who spent some time in Rome with Mme. Montessori says, 'She [Montessori] seems to feel that a child's spiritual nature will ___ aright if freedom is given ....

Language: English

ISSN: 1940-7831

Article

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Children’s Preference for Real Activities: Even Stronger in the Montessori Children’s House

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 4, no. 2

Pages: 1-9

Americas, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: In the United States, children are often given the opportunity to engage in pretend activities; many believe this kind of play benefits children’s development. Recent research has shown, though, that when children ages 4 to 6 are given a choice to do the pretend or the real version of 9 different activities, they would prefer the real one. The reasons children gave for preferring real activities often concerned their appreciation of the functionality; when children did prefer pretend activities, their reasons often cited being afraid of, not allowed to, or unable to do the real activity. Given that children in Montessori classrooms have more experience performing real, functional activities, in this study we asked if this preference for real activities is even stronger among children in Montessori schools. We also asked children to explain their preferences. The data are from 116 3- to 6-year-old children (M = 59.63 months, SD = 12.08 months; 68 female): 62 not in Montessori schools and 54 in Montessori schools. Children explained their preferences for pretendand real versions of 9 different activities. Children in Montessori schools preferred real activities even more than did children in other preschools, but all children explained their choices in similar ways. The implications of these results are discussed with regard to play in preschool classrooms.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v4i2.7586

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

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Societal Values and Policies May Curtail Preschool Children’s Physical Activity in Child Care Centers

Available from: American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)

Publication: Pediatrics, vol. 129, no. 2

Pages: 265-274

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Abstract/Notes: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Three-fourths of US preschool-age children are in child care centers. Children are primarily sedentary in these settings, and are not meeting recommended levels of physical activity. Our objective was to identify potential barriers to children’s physical activity in child care centers. METHODS: Nine focus groups with 49 child care providers (55% African American) were assembled from 34 centers (inner-city, suburban, Head Start, and Montessori) in Cincinnati, Ohio. Three coders independently analyzed verbatim transcripts for themes. Data analysis and interpretation of findings were verified through triangulation of methods. RESULTS: We identified 3 main barriers to children’s physical activity in child care: (1) injury concerns, (2) financial, and (3) a focus on “academics.” Stricter licensing codes intended to reduce children's injuries on playgrounds rendered playgrounds less physically challenging and interesting. In addition, some parents concerned about potential injury, requested staff to restrict playground participation for their children. Small operating margins of most child care centers limited their ability to install abundant playground equipment. Child care providers felt pressure from state mandates and parents to focus on academics at the expense of gross motor play. Because children spend long hours in care and many lack a safe place to play near their home, these barriers may limit children's only opportunity to engage in physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: Societal priorities for young children—safety and school readiness—may be hindering children’s physical development. In designing environments that optimally promote children’s health and development, child advocates should think holistically about potential unintended consequences of policies.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1542/peds.2011-2102

ISSN: 0031-4005, 1098-4275

Article

The Child Before Seven Years of Age; The Child After Seven Years of Age; and What Children Taught Dr. Montessori

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 23, no. 2

Pages: 82-99

Mario M. Montessori - Writings, Renilde Montessori - Writings

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Abstract/Notes: The three lectures reprinted here, given in 1957 London Elementary course, integrate the Montessori perspective on the Elementary child and Cosmic Education: (1) differences between children before and after 7 years of age; (2) characteristics of children 7 years and older; and (3) the adult role in responding to children in the second stage of development. (Author)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Comparison of Sudoku Solving Skills of Preschool Children Enrolled in the Montessori Approach and the National Education Programs

Available from: Red Fame

Publication: Journal of Education and Training Studies, vol. 8, no. 3

Pages: 32-47

Asia, Comparative education, Middle East, Turkey, Turkey, Western Asia

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Abstract/Notes: According to Johnson-Laird (2010), sudoku, a mind game, is based on a pure deduction and reasoning processes. This study analyzed sudoku solving skills of preschool children and to ascertain whether there was a difference between children who were educated according to the Ministry of Education preschool education program and the Montessori approach. Sudoku skills of children were analyzed by gender, age, duration of preschool attendance, mother’s and father’s education level and previous experience of playing sudoku using a 12-question Sudoku Skills Measurement Tool developed for this research study. The study sample of the study consisted of 118 children (57 girls, 61 boys) aged between 54-77 months. The findings showed that there was no significant difference in sudoku skills by gender. However, sudoku skills varied with age (54-65 months and 66-77 months) in favor of older groups. Children's sudoku skills were more developed with an increase in education level of either parent. Children who had been in preschool for longer had higher sudoku scores. A previous experience of playing sudoku did not impact sudoku scores. Sudoku skills of children who were educated according to the Montessori program were more developed compared to those of children educated according to Ministry of National Education program.According to Johnson-Laird (2010), sudoku, a mind game, is based on a pure deduction and reasoning processes. This study analyzed sudoku solving skills of preschool children and to ascertain whether there was a difference between children who were educated according to the Ministry of Education preschool education program and the Montessori approach. Sudoku skills of children were analyzed by gender, age, duration of preschool attendance, mother’s and father’s education level and previous experience of playing sudoku using a 12-question Sudoku Skills Measurement Tool developed for this research study. The study sample of the study consisted of 118 children (57 girls, 61 boys) aged between 54-77 months. The findings showed that there was no significant difference in sudoku skills by gender. However, sudoku skills varied with age (54-65 months and 66-77 months) in favor of older groups. Children's sudoku skills were more developed with an increase in education level of either parent. Children who had been in preschool for longer had higher sudoku scores. A previous experience of playing sudoku did not impact sudoku scores. Sudoku skills of children who were educated according to the Montessori program were more developed compared to those of children educated according to Ministry of National Education program.

Language: English

DOI: 10.11114/jets.v8i3.4620

ISSN: 2324-8068

Article

Dr. Montessori Aims to Aid Poor: Italian Educator Says Their Children Are More Eager to Learn

Available from: Chronicling America (Library of Congress)

Publication: New York Tribune (New York, New York)

Pages: 6

Americas, Margaret Naumburg - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: "Yesterday the Dottoressa Maria Montessori held the first conference with her pupils in America. It was at the Children's House, 520 East Seventy-seventh Street. The Children's House is one of the thirty Montessori schools which have sprung up in New York during the last three years. The conference was impressive. The great Italian teacher greeted her pupils, her disciples , if you like, with delight and apparent amazement at the development of her work in New York. "This beautiful house of the children!" She cried. "You have so much here; in Italy we cannot give the children all this, we have it not to give, but little is much when children are free." Her work is growing fast in Italy. In the districts which have been devastated by the earthquakes twelve schools have been established. "I have now developed a method of educating children from five to ten years old. By it they learn reading, writing, arithmetic very easily - but especially nature, science, the languages. Then they are ready to enter the high schools, I believe you call it. Two years are saved in the school life of every child. My elementary methods have been put into sixteen schools in Italy. Signorini Maccheroni is training teachers and opening our schools in Spain." Miss Anne E. George, who introduced Dr. Montessori's work into this community, asked how Montessori teachers in the United States could learn the methods for older pupils. "Signorina Fidele might come here and supervise the elementary classes which you form." "But you, Dottoressa," exclaimed Margaret Naumberg, "why won't you stay and help us?" Dr. Montessori didn't say she would, but I noticed particularly that she didn't say she wouldn't. She is now on her way to California, where she will give a four months' course in Montessori methods in Los Angeles and San Diego. Her latest book, describing her work with older children, will be published in the fall. "Now, that is all my news, and I want to hear what you are doing. I want always to keep in close touch with you and with your work. Tell me what you are doing." Mrs. A. Reno Margulies, of 534 West 187th Street, told of her work with deaf and backward children. Miss George spoke of hers. "Ah," said Dr. Montessori, "but are you not working with the children of the well-to-do? Tell me what you are doing for the children of the poor." Miss Zoé Bateman, secretary of the Montessori Association, explained that the Children's House in which the conference was held was a free school, supported by contributions. "It is very hard to get the work taken up by the public schools," said Margaret Naumberg. "We have just secured permission to establish a class in Public School 4. It was only possible because of the enthusiasm of the principal, Simon Hirsdansky, for Dr. Montessori's work. "Until the work is developed by the Board of Education it cannot be carried very far among the poor, for teachers must live as well as teach." "It is easier to teach the children of the poor," said Dr. Montessori. "They are more eager to learn." "Oh, no" cried her pupils in chorus, "The children who have better homes, better food and better care learn much faster than the poorer children." "I had a group of poor children last winter, and a group of well-to-do children this winter," said Margaret Naumberg, "and the latter learned in six weeks more than the former learned in a year.""

Language: English

ISSN: 1941-0646

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Transforming theories of childhood and early childhood education: Child study and the empirical assault on Froebelian rationalism

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Paedagogica Historica: International Journal of the History of Education, vol. 45, no. 4

Pages: 585-604

Friedrich Fröbel, Positivism, positivism, scientific pedagogy

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Abstract/Notes: This article considers the possibility that one of the defining characteristics of the New Education, as it related to children in their early years, was its epistemological break with rationalist forms of knowledge and its embrace of empiricism and positivism. It considers, briefly, social theories that identify a similar process at a societal level before examining some of the polemics directed against theories of education based on rational forms of knowledge and, in particular, Froebel’s system. This theme is then pursued through a detailed consideration of the child study movement in England and its promotion of an empiricist project concerned with the production of knowledge about the child which drew upon the emergent fields of physiology, educational psychology, education and statistics. It is argued that child study helped to create the conditions for these sciences to distinguish themselves from the older philosophical currents from which they emerged. Consideration is then paid to how these transformations reacted on child study and on the Froebel movement. The article concludes that a break did indeed occur in the ways in which education was legitimised and that through the arrival of a new empirically based, scientific approach it became more closely aligned to reforming impulses. Nevertheless, the old philosophical, metaphysical foundations were not vanquished as in a violent rupture but were articulated in a new dialectical synthesis.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/00309230903100965

ISSN: 0030-9230, 1477-674X

Doctoral Dissertation

Everyday Spirituality: Supporting the Spiritual Experience of Young Children in Three Early Childhood Educational Settings

Available from: Massey University - Theses and Dissertations

Australasia, Australia and New Zealand, Child development, Comparative education, Montessori schools, New Zealand, Oceania, Spirituality, Waldorf schools

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Abstract/Notes: The focus of this research is the spiritual experience of young children in early childhood educational settings. Spirituality is included in the New Zealand early childhood curriculum, Te Whariki, but is a relatively unarticulated aspect of educational practice. In order to find out how spirituality is supported in early childhood educational contexts this qualitative case study research took place in three early childhood settings: a Montessori casa, a private preschool and a Steiner (Waldorf) kindergarten. The methods used in the research included participant observation, interviews and focus groups. The teachers were asked to make a video about spirituality to reflect their own context and photographs were taken in each setting. The metaphor of spiritual landscape is used in this research. In this landscape everyday experience merged with the spiritual to form the concept of everyday spirituality. The cultural theories of everyday life supported a realisation that ordinary daily activity can become wonderful and mysterious when the spiritual dimension is realised. The themes that emerged from analysis of the case studies are conceptualised as transformative aspects of learning and relationships. They are aspects of everyday spirituality identified as spiritual withness; spiritual inbetweenness; and the spiritually elsewhere. Representing spiritual experience is challenging. The thesis is written in narrative form and contains core narratives as prose and poems. Using writing as a means of discovery made communicating spirituality through the medium of words a possibility. Spirituality is proposed to be an inclusive concept that affirms a sense of connection and this thesis found that all pedagogical practices in early childhood settings have the potential to include a spiritual aspect. In Aotearoa New Zealand many children lead their everyday lives in the context of an early childhood environment that includes teachers and parents as part of that community. This thesis argues that when everyday spirituality permeates early childhood contexts that all aspects of the curriculum are realised and the spiritual experience of everyone connected to that setting is supported.

Language: English

Published: Palmerston North, New Zealand, 2007

Doctoral Dissertation

Parents and Early Childhood Programs: A Historical Analysis

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: Since early childhood programs were first introduced in the United States in the 1820s, early childhood professionals have been aware that teaching and caring for young children involves establishing relationships with their families. This study is a historical examination of the relationships between early childhood programs and parents. The study considered the political, social, and economic factors that have influenced the development of relationships between parents and early childhood programs, including: infant schools; kindergarten; laboratory schools; nursery schools; Montessori programs; day nurseries and child care; and Head Start. The study showed that the history of parent involvement in early childhood programs is essentially the history of early childhood programs. Since the 1820s, early childhood professionals have provided ample literary evidence of how parents were expected to be involved in early childhood programs, and how these expectations were communicated to them. Literary evidence was the basis for this study. Evidence used in the study included: autobiographies, journals, recollections, and letters of key participants; manuals of early childhood practice; proceedings from meetings and conferences; publications from government agencies; articles and commentaries from professional journals and popular magazines; theoretical and practical works by leaders in the field; research studies; textbooks; and childrearing advice books. The history of early childhood programs reveals a wide range of attempts to bring parents and early childhood programs together. At various times and in various contexts, these attempts have been called parent cooperation, parent education, parent participation, parent involvement, and teacher-parent partnership. Throughout most of the history of early childhood programs, parents were cast in the role of learner. More recently, the ideal relationship between parents and early childhood professionals has been characterized as that of a partnership. The various terms that have been used to describe the relationships between parents and early childhood programs were examined through the course of this study, as were the assumptions and beliefs that have influenced the interpretation of these terms.

Language: English

Published: Boston, Massachusetts, 1999

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