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500 results

Article

Integrated Edcuaton of Healthy Children and Children with Multiple and Variable Disorders

Publication: Communications (Association Montessori Internationale, 195?-2008), vol. 1981, no. 1/2

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Special education

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Language: English

ISSN: 0519-0959

Article

The Children's Garden and the Children's House

Available from: Internet Archive

Publication: New Era in Home and School, vol. 33, no. 3

Pages: 50-54

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Language: English

ISSN: 0028-5048

Article

Parent Enrollment at Model Children's House [Powder Mill Children's House, Beltsville, Maryland]

Publication: Montessori Observer, vol. 11, no. 6

Pages: 1, 4

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Language: English

ISSN: 0889-5643

Article

Flotsam and Jetsam; Amsterdam - Children at Montessori Primary Schools Perform Better than Other Children in Traditional Schools

Available from: Digital Library of the Caribbean

Publication: Bonaire Reporter (Bonaire, Caribbean Netherlands)

Pages: 3

Caribbean

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Language: English

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Making Room for Children's Autonomy: Maria Montessori's Case for Seeing Children's Incapacity for Autonomy as an External Failing

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: Journal of Philosophy of Education, vol. 50, no. 3

Pages: 332-350

Maria Montessori - Philosophy

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Abstract/Notes: This article draws on Martha Nussbaum's distinction between basic, internal, and external (or combined) capacities to better specify possible locations for children's ‘incapacity’ for autonomy. I then examine Maria Montessori's work on what she calls ‘normalization’, which involves a release of children's capacities for autonomy and self-governance made possible by being provided with the right kind of environment. Using Montessori, I argue that, in contrast to many ordinary and philosophical assumptions, children's incapacities for autonomy are best understood as consequences of an absence of external conditions necessary for children to exercise capacities they already have internally, rather than intrinsic limitations based on their stage of life. In a closing section, I show how Montessori proposes a model wherein both children and adults have autonomy, power, and responsibility, but over different spheres, and suggest implications of these differences for who has responsibility for establishing the conditions under which children can flourish.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1111/1467-9752.12134

ISSN: 1467-9752

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The 'Cosmic' Task of the Youngest Children – Direct, Anticipate or Respect? Experiences Working with Small Children

Available from: Stockholm University Press

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research and Education, vol. 2, no. 1

Pages: 1–12

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Abstract/Notes: The article derived from Grazia Honegger Fresco’s years in close cooperation with Maria Montessori and Adele Costa Gnocchi. The author illustrates how small children from the moment they start using their hands and are standing unassisted on their own legs must act in their own way. The teacher must observe before acting and intervene as little as possible. Honegger Fresco follows the work of Montessori and Costa Gnocchi and she compares the findings with different fields of science, such as ethnology and neurology. As a result of her observations and experiences she points toward the relationship between a good childhood, and in the long term, human responsibility on Earth, using the concept “the Cosmic Task”. The method in this article is based on autoethnography, as the author shares her personal experience and reflections, both as a teacher and as an educator. The aim is to shed light on aspects regarding the needs of small children and to point at the essential role of adults, educators as well as parents. As Schiedi explains, autoethnography “extends its narrative horizon to a social, professional, organizational dimension of the self” (2016). During Honegger Fresco’s career, she was primarily inspired by Maria Montessori’s research about child development and children’s needs and rights, and she had continuously deepened her understanding by studying other researchers in this field. Thus, the article will share her conviction that by serving the creative spirit of the youngest children we will build a better future for our planet.

Language: English

DOI: 10.16993/jmre.10

ISSN: 2002-3375

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Children’s Preference for Real Activities: Even Stronger in the Montessori Children’s House

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 4, no. 2

Pages: 1-9

Americas, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: In the United States, children are often given the opportunity to engage in pretend activities; many believe this kind of play benefits children’s development. Recent research has shown, though, that when children ages 4 to 6 are given a choice to do the pretend or the real version of 9 different activities, they would prefer the real one. The reasons children gave for preferring real activities often concerned their appreciation of the functionality; when children did prefer pretend activities, their reasons often cited being afraid of, not allowed to, or unable to do the real activity. Given that children in Montessori classrooms have more experience performing real, functional activities, in this study we asked if this preference for real activities is even stronger among children in Montessori schools. We also asked children to explain their preferences. The data are from 116 3- to 6-year-old children (M = 59.63 months, SD = 12.08 months; 68 female): 62 not in Montessori schools and 54 in Montessori schools. Children explained their preferences for pretendand real versions of 9 different activities. Children in Montessori schools preferred real activities even more than did children in other preschools, but all children explained their choices in similar ways. The implications of these results are discussed with regard to play in preschool classrooms.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v4i2.7586

ISSN: 2378-3923

Book Section

Written Language: The Old Methods of Teaching Reading and Writing; My First Experiments with Defective Children; First Experiments with Normal Children

Book Title: The Discovery of the Child

Pages: 199-216

Maria Montessori - Writings

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Abstract/Notes: Formerly entitled The Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in the Children's Houses. This book was first published in 1909 under the title 'Il Metodo della Pedagogia Scientifica Applicato all'Educazione Infantile nelle Case dei Bambini' ('The Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in the Children's Houses) and was revised in 1913, 1926, and 1935. Maria Montessori revised and reissued this book in 1948 and renamed it 'La Scoperta del Bambino'. This edition is based on the 6th Italian edition of 'La Scoperta del Bambino' published by the Italian publisher Garzanti, Milan, Italy in 1962. M. J. Costelloe, S. J. translated this Italian version into the English language in 1967 for Fides Publishers, Inc. In 2016 Fred Kelpin edited this version and added many footnotes. He incorporated new illustrations based on AMI-blueprints of the materials currently in use.

Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company, 2017

ISBN: 978-90-79506-38-5

Series: The Montessori Series , 2

Article

Spaces for Children: Listing to Young Children about Their Early Childhood Environments

Publication: Montessori International, vol. 84

Pages: 16–17

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Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

Book

The Advanced Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to the Education of Children: Spontaneous Activity in Children

Maria Montessori - Writings

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Abstract/Notes: First published in Italian in 1915, the English translation, titled The Advanced Montessori Method, vol. 1: Spontaneous Activity in Education, was first published in 1917.

Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori Pierson Publishing Company, 2018

ISBN: 978-90-79506-27-9

Series: The Montessori Series , 9

Volume: 1 of 2

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