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1153 results

Article

Children with Disabilities: Guidelines for Referral and Test Evaluation for Montessori Schools

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 15, no. 2

Pages: 25–26

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, Joyce S. Pickering - Writings, Montessori method of education, People with disabilities, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Interaction of Children with and without Communication Disorders Using Montessori Activities for the Tablet

Available from: SpringerLink

Publication: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, vol. 25

Pages: 495-507

Children with disabilities, Communicative disorders in children, Inclusive education, Montessori method of education, Montessori method of education, People with disabilities

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Abstract/Notes: Mobile technologies used for education may offer advantages for children with Communication Disorders, among which we can find language disorders and speech disorders, which are identified in DSM-V. In this research, we have introduced two educational activities, “Matching Cards” and “Cards & Sounds”, based on the Montessori Method and which deal with the first stages of reading and writing. We have tested these two activities with children with and without Communication Disorders in order to study how they interact. These groups of children use a Tablet to perform the two activities, which vary in visual and auditory stimuli. The activities employ two touch interactions: tap and drag & drop. Based on Montessori, the activity and the interaction do not produce either positive or negative feedback. The analysis performed with the variables of time, interaction and mistake has shown that children from both groups change their efficiency of use. Differences regarding the interaction of children with and without Communication Disorders have also been observed. Additionally, children with Communication Disorders need additional strategies as explicit indicators in the interaction which may be a guide to be able to carry out specific actions.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s00779-020-01471-7

ISSN: 1617-4909, 1617-4917

Article

Benefits of Good Shepherd Catechesis Among Children with Intellectual Disabilities in Kenya

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: Journal of Religious Education, vol. 66, no. 3

Pages: 225-234

Africa, Children with disabilities, East Africa, Inclusive education, Kenya, Learning disabilities, People with disabilities, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Abstract/Notes: Since Martin Luther, religious education has largely been identified with catechism that used question and answer method, particularly in the Catholic church. For a person with intellectual disability, this offers a grave difficulty in religious formation. Could there be alternatives? The present study aimed at exploring the benefits of Catechesis of the Good Shepherd (CGS) for children living with intellectual disabilities. The participants were 23 children and nine care-givers in a Catholic context in Kenya. Observation guides and interviews were used to collect data that showed that children with intellectual disabilities had the ability to spontaneously relate with the spiritual world, and in some cases, with Jesus. The findings confirmed that the CGS offers children with special needs the space, tools, and time to get in touch with the Divine through witnessing to the narrative of the Word.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s40839-018-0069-5

ISSN: 2199-4625

Article

President Wilson's Daughter to Aid Mme. Montessori Show Her System

Available from: Library of Congress

Publication: The Sun (New York) (New York City, NY)

Pages: 6

Americas, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The Montessori movement, considered by many a radical departure from traditional educational methods, will receive new emphasis and publicity from the fact that visitors to the Panama-Pacific International Exposition will see during the months of August, September, October and November not only a demonstration of the Montessori system but will see it conducted by the talented woman herself. Associated with her will be Miss Margaret Wilson, daughter of the President, Dr. David Starr Jordan, chancellor of Leland Stanford Junior University, and other well known educators. The Montessori method has been summed up as 'freedom for development of the child under best conditions disturbing as little as possible but helping buy every means this development.' Any estimate of Mme. Montessori's work to be of practical value will involve a comparison between the Montessori method and that of the kindergarten, since the kindergarten is the only system of organizes educational work for young children that has so far received general recognition. In the middle of the last century the sensitive woman soul and philosophic mind of Froebel grasped the fundamental principle of development and say that the first six or seven years are the most important in the life of the individual. After years of study he embodied what he conceived to be the fundamental principles of the education of little children in what is known as the kindergarten, and his ideas of the best means for the application of these principles in his kindergarten program, materials and devices. The discovery of the kindergarten marked a new era in the history of the educational world. Though suppressed for years by government authority in Germany, and received with much suspicion elsewhere, the kindergarten has become an integral part of the public school system of many cities and States in our country. Its introduction into England was championed by Charles Dickens, and in America it found an advocate in the philosopher and educator Dr. William T. Harris. Concerning the kindergarten and the Montessori methods, Dr. P. P. Claxton, United States Commissioner of Education says: 'Though aims and principles are the same for both Froebel and Montessori, their different methods of approach have resulted in difference in emphasis, program and decides. For those who see no further than the form there is apparent conflict. Many cannot understand that the work of both Froebel and Montessori must finally lose each its distinctive characteristics in the larger whole of a more perfect knowledge of the nature of infancy and the means of educating young children.' It must be said of Dr. Montessori that she is first, last and always scientific in her work. Prolonged training in the sciences that relate to human life, vitalized by practical experience in their application to defective children, gave her a method which is the outcome of genius, training and experience. She swung into prominence, against her wish, in the following way: While serving as assistant doctor at the psychiatric clinic of the University of Rome, Italy, she founder herself differing from her colleagues in that she felt, as she says, 'that mental deficiency presented chiefly a pedagogic rather than mainly a medical problem.' The expression of these views in an address brought Dr. Montessori prominently before the Minister of Public Instruction, and her work from this on assumed a public character. Her belief that the methods employed with deficient children 'contained educational principles more rational than those in use and that if applied to normal children they would develop or set free their personality in a marvelous and surprising way,' became her controlling idea, and is the very heart of the Montessori system. The system of Mme. Montessori is indissolubly joined with her famous 'didactic material.' Among this will be found small wooden frames to which are attached pieces of cloth or leather on which are buttons and buttonholes, hooks and eyes, eyelets and lacing cords, and strings to be tied and untied. There are also boxes of cylindrical insets and other simple devices to develop 'man's mystery over nature.' Mme. Montessori is her best interpreter when she says, 'We are inclined to believe that children are like puppets and we wash them and feed them as if they were dolls. We do not stop to think that the child that does not do does not know how to do. Our duty is that of helping him to make a conquest of such useful acts as nature intended he should perform for himself. The mother who feeds her child without making the least effort to teach him to hold the spoon for himself and to try to find his mouth with it is not a wise mother. She treats her son as though he were a doll. We call an individual disciplined when he is master of himself and can regulate his own conduct when it shall be necessary to follow some rule of life. If any educational act is to be efficacious it is necessary rigorously to avoid the arrest of spontaneous movements and the imposition of arbitrary tasks. It is of course understood here that we do not speak of a useless or dangerous act; this must be suppressed, destroyed.' The Montessori doctrine is therefore in substance that the child's inner self or personalit cannot rightfully develop unless free to express itself undirected and unguided by another person. As a consequence Dr. Montessori insists that each child be allowed bodily freedom and have as much unhampered liberty of action as possible in order that he may fully express his inner life in outer activity. The classic illustration by which Dr. Montessori puts in concrete form her doctrine is the following: 'One day the children had gathered in a circle about a basin of water containing some floating toys. A little boy 2 1/2 years old had been left outside the circle. He drew near to the other children and tried to force his way among them, but he was not strong enough to do this. The expression of thought on his face was intensely interesting. His eyes then lighted upon a little chair and he had evidently made up his mind to place it behind the group of children and climb on it. As he began to move toward the chair, his face illuminated with hope, a teacher seized him in her arms, lifted him above the heads of the other children, showed him the basin of water, saying, 'Come poor little one you shall see too.' The child seeing the floating toys did not experience the joy that he was about to feel through conquering the obstacles with his own force. The teacher hindered the child in this case from educating himself. The little fellow was about to feel himself a conqueror, and instead he found himself held within two imprisoning arms impotent.' The now famous 'House of the Children' in Rome, under the patronage of Queen Margherita, faithfully reflects and demonstrates the Montessori principles and methods. It has been described as an old orphan asylum, whose gray outer walls give no idea of the two beautiful and luxuriant courtyards within. These latter are filled with beds of blossoming plans, and the pillars of the inner porch are covered with clinging vines. The schoolroom in which the class for the children is held opens with wide double doors into one of these lovely courtyards, where the children play during hours in which they are not engaged in their Montessori exercises. Miss Elizabeth Harrison, president of the National Kindergarten Union says of this 'House of the Children': 'On my first visit I found the children busy getting out the 'didactic material' with which they were to employ themselves for the next hour and a quarter. Some came forward to shake hands with me; some merely smiled and nodded and did not interrupt their work. All seemed busy, happy and free. I afterward saw as many as eighty visitors in the room where there were only a dozen children, but none of the children were in the least disturbed by or seemingly conscious of the presence of the visitors. Most of the children came from nearby tenement houses, yet even the youngest of them washed their own hands and faces, put on clean, neat calico aprons and looked as fresh and clean as children from well cared for homes.' Comparing the kindergarten and the Montessori systems, the following differences appear: The kindergarten stresses group activities, while the Montessori system emphasized almost exclusively the development of the individual. The kindergartners say that education in coordinating of muscles, the special training of the child's senses and all such phases of individual development are expected to come in the nursery. The Montessori system has no place for stories; the kindergartners are famous for them. Mme. Montessori objects to stories for young children on the theory that all activities of the mind are derived from the outside world and are dependent on sense impressions, and that therefore the child should be kept within the realm of his own personal experience until he is at least 7 or 8 years old. It is not necessary to add that two __ meet at this point of difference. The most remarkable features of the Montessori system, as well as one of its decided points of divergence from the kindergarten, lies in its ___ of definite attitude on religious training. Froebel, trained in an environment where instruction in religion is practically nationwide, says that while the child unconsciously manifests teh divine impuse within him he must follow it with conscious insights persisting in what he knows to do right and must needs have definite training of this kind. Montessori, on the other hand, with nuns as her assistants and attendants in her 'House of the Children,' acknowledges the importance of religious training for little children, 'but confesses that as yet it is an unsolved problem to her.' Miss Harrison, who spent some time in Rome with Mme. Montessori says, 'She [Montessori] seems to feel that a child's spiritual nature will ___ aright if freedom is given ....

Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation

Evidence Based Social Skills Interventions for Young Children with Asperger’s Syndrome and the Montessori Educational Method: An Integrative Review

Available from: University of Pennsylvania Libraries

Asperger's syndrome in children, Autism in children, Children with disabilities, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, People with disabilities

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Abstract/Notes: Asperger’s Syndrome (AS) is a medically recognized disorder on the Autism Spectrum. One in 88 children age eight are diagnosed with AS (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, 2014). A key feature of AS is a deficiency in social skills. In the past ten years five main types of social skills interventions have been researched for their impact on young children with AS. Data suggest these treatments help children with AS acquire social skills. More research is needed on the types of learning environments that incorporate or lend themselves to utilizing these types of social skills interventions. One potential model, the Montessori Method of education was initially designed to teach children with significant developmental, social, and educational disabilities, with an intentional focus on individualized learning and socialization. To date, the potential overlap between empirically supported interventions to teach social skills to children with AS and the Montessori Method of education has not been researched. A comprehensive literature review was conducted to compare five researched interventions for social skill acquisition in children with AS with the Montessori Method of education. Findings suggest that of these five interventions, three bear significant resemblance to the Montessori Method of education while the other two do not. Implications and recommendations for parents, teachers, educational administrators, and social workers and other mental health practitioners who assist children with AS are provided.

Language: English

Published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 2014

Article

Effectiveness of Montessori Sensorial Training Program for Children with Mild Intellectual Disabilities in Pakistan: A Randomized Control Trial

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: International Journal of Disability, Development and Education

Pages: 1-11

Asia, Children with disabilities, Developmentally disabled children, Pakistan, Sensorial education, Sensorial materials, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Intellectual disability is a serious lifelong disability that places heavy demands on society and the health system. The study was designed to determine the extent to which the intellectually challenged children are capable of improving their cognitive abilities as well as adaptive functioning through the Montessori Sensorial Training program when introduced in a different setting (i.e. special education school system). With randomised control trial (RCT) of pre-and post-testing, 30 children with mild intellectual disabilities were randomly allocated to Montessori Sensorial Training intervention condition (n = 15) and waitlist control condition (n = 15). The intervention group showed significant improvement in cognitive abilities (i.e. classification, seriation, recognition, ordination, and visual and auditory discrimination) as compared to the control group at post-assessment. Children who received training also showed improvement in communication and self-care domain as compared to the control group. This study provides evidence that Montessori Sensorial Training is not only effective for children going to mainstream schools but also for children with intellectual disabilities. Despite some limitations, the results of the study are encouraging and suggesting that Montessori Sensorial Training is an effective intervention to facilitate self-based learning, independence, and decision-making skills in children with mild intellectual disabilities.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/1034912X.2021.2016657

ISSN: 1034-912X

Article

Honoring Montessori's Work with Children with Special Needs

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 28, no. 3

Pages: 9

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, People with disabilities, Special education, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: In the report summarizing the results, Jackie Cossentino, MLC member, indicated that the area of professional development most requested by teachers is working with children with learning differences, including children on the autism spectrum.(Other areas of professional development Montessori teachers expressed a need for were reading and writing, observation, math, science, parent/community engagement, nature/ environment, peace education, social studies, Grace and Courtesy, Practical Life, Sensorial, art, gifted students, English-language learners, serving lowincome students, and state standards.) The Special Education Endorsement Task Force is preparing a survey, expanding upon the MLC survey, that we hope will provide more information regarding perceptions among our AMS community of 14,000 members about working with students with special needs in our Montessori classrooms as well as professional-development needs related to special education.The area of professional development most requested by Montessori teachers is working with children with learning differences, including children on the autism spectrum.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Playing to Learn: An Overview of the Montessori Approach with Pre-school Children with Autism Spectrum Condition

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: Support for Learning, vol. 31, no. 4

Pages: 313-328

Autism in children, Children with disabilities, Developmentally disabled children, Montessori method of education, Montessori method of education, Preschool children

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Abstract/Notes: This article explores some of the literature concerning the effectiveness of the Montessori educational approach for children with ASC within an English school context. Firstly, there is a discussion, including a short historical review, regarding the ideology of inclusion and how it has impacted upon mainstream education. Also, how this can be facilitated using play-based approaches such as Montessori. Secondly, various models of disability are identified in order to highlight how they have informed societal attitudes towards people with disabilities. There is a brief history of ASC detailing how a child with this disability may be affected on a daily basis and the effectiveness of alternative play-based educational approaches such as Montessori in helping children with ASC to develop the appropriate skills they need in order to self-regulate and thus modify their behaviour. Furthermore, the value of play-based curriculums in supporting a child diagnosed with ASC throughout the learning process is also evaluated. The summary highlights the need for more evidence-based studies to be undertaken in order to assess whether the Montessori approach is a valid alternative in teaching pre-school children with ASC.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1111/1467-9604.12140

ISSN: 1467-9604

Bachelors Thesis

Η ενσωμάτωση των παιδιών με μαθησιακές δυσκολίες στο εκπαιδευτικό σύστημα Μοντεσσόρι [The Inclusion of Children with Learning Disabilities into the Montessori Education System]

Available from: University of Western Macedonia

Children with disabilities, Europe, Greece, Inclusive education, Learning disabilities, Montessori method of education, Southern Europe

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Abstract/Notes: Η εργασία αναφέρεται στην δυνατότητα ενσωμάτωσης παιδιών προσχολικής ηλικίας με ειδικές μαθησιακές δυσκολίες στο παιδαγωγικό σύστημα Μοντεσσόρι. Πιο αναλυτικά η παρούσα πτυχιακή εργασία αποτελείται από τρία κεφάλαια, ουσιαστικά τρία κύρια μέρη. Το πρώτο κεφάλαιο της εργασίας παρουσιάζει τον εννοιολογικό προσδιορισμό των μαθησιακών δυσκολιών και αναφέρει αναλυτικά τα χαρακτηριστικά των παιδιών με ειδικές μαθησιακές δυσκολίες. Μετέπειτα, αναφέρεται στο ιδανικό εκπαιδευτικό περιβάλλον μάθησης, στο οποίο κατηγοριοποιούνται οι πιο συχνές ειδικές μαθησιακές δυσκολίες. Αφετέρου, τεκμηριώνεται με σαφήνεια ο ορισμός και η έννοια της ενσωμάτωσης στο πλαίσιο του παιδαγωγικού συστήματος της Μοντεσσόρι εστιασμένο σε παιδιά με ειδικές μαθησιακές δυσκολίες και τεκμηριώνονται οι παράγοντες που επηρεάζουν την ενσωμάτωση. Το δεύτερο κεφάλαιο περιλαμβάνει το Διαθεματικό Ενιαίο Πλαίσιο Προγραμμάτων Σπουδών (ΔΕΠΠΣ), τις βασικές αρχές και τον σκοπό ολόπλευρης ανάπτυξης των παιδιών και την ανάγκη ποικίλων διδακτικών προσεγγίσεων, διότι κάθε άτομο έχει διαφορετικές ανάγκες. Επίσης, επισημαίνεται η αναγνώριση πρώιμων ενδείξεων για τις ειδικές μαθησιακές δυσκολίες στην πρώιμη σχολική ηλικία. Ακόμη, τονίζεται η σημασία της πρώιμης παρέμβασης ως προς την αποφυγή δευτερογενών προβλημάτων. Το τρίτο κεφάλαιο αναφέρεται αρχικά, στην βιογραφία και το έργο της Μαρίας Μοντεσσόρι, στη συνέχεια, παρουσιάζονται τρόποι για την χρήση εκπαιδευτικού υλικού σε παιδιά με ειδικές μαθησιακές δυσκολίες. Επίσης, περιγράφεται η οπτική της Μοντεσσόρι για τα παιδιά με ειδικές μαθησιακές δυσκολίες. Τέλος, αναλύεται ο ρόλος του εκπαιδευτικού και το πρόγραμμα σπουδών για τα παιδιά φυσιολογικής ανάπτυξης που συμπεριλαμβάνει και τα παιδιά που αντιμετωπίζουν μαθησιακές δυσκολίες. [The current thesis refers to the possibility of integrating preschool children with special learning disabilities into the Montessori pedagogical system. In more detail, this dissertation consists of three chapters, essentially three main parts. The first chapter of the work presents the conceptual definition of learning disabilities and mentions in detail the characteristics of children with special learning disabilities. Subsequently, it refers in detail to the ideal educational learning environment, in which the most common special learning disabilities are categorized. On the other hand, the definition and concept of integration within the Montessori pedagogical system is clearly documented in children with special learning disabilities and the factors that affect integration are documented. The second chapter includes the Interdisciplinary Unified Curriculum Framework (IUCF), the basic principles and purpose of children's all-round development and the need for a variety of teaching approaches, because each person has different needs. It is also important to recognize early indications of special learning disabilities in the kindergarten. It also emphasizes the importance of early intervention to avoid secondary problems. The third chapter first deals with the biography and work of Maria Montessori, then presents ways to use educational material in children with special learning disabilities. Montessori's vision for children with special learning disabilities is also described. Lastly are analyzed the role of the teacher and the curriculum for children of normal development, including children with learning disabilities.]

Language: Greek

Published: Kozani, Greece, 2020

Report

The Evaluation and Implications of Research with Young Handicapped and Low-Income Children at the Institute for Research on Exceptional Children at the University of Illinois

Available from: ERIC

Americas, Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, North America, Poor children, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This study to determine effects of preschool training of mentally retarded children from low-income families asks three major questions: 1. Does preschool training displace the rate of development of such children? 2. Does rate of growth continue at an accelerated rate, or does it return to the original rate of development during primary school years? 3. Are the results similar for children living in different environments? Five intervention programs are outlined: 1. Traditional nursery school; 2. Community Integrated program; 3. The Montessori method; 4. Karnes structured cognitive plan; and 5. The Bereiter-Englemann(B-E). As a result of the program, some children in the demonstration center no longer function in the retarded range. Behavior has improved and several have entered a public school or preschool for normal children. It is suggested that mothers of infants might accomplish more at home with guidance, since professional tutoring is not feasibly practical, and children with higher IQ need special early programming to attain their potential. (RG)

Language: English

Published: Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, 1973

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