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Article

TEP Listings

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 32, no. 1

Pages: 54-55

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Teacher education programs affiliated by the American Montessori Society provide comprehensive courses of study that prepare the adult learners of today to be the highly skilled, highly qualified Montessori teachers and leaders of tomorrow. ARIZONA ARIZONA MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Chandler KHALSA MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary II, Elementary I-II Tucson ARKANSAS ARKANSAS CENTER FOR MONTESSORI STUDIES Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Little Rock CALIFORNIA CAPITAL EDUCATION INSTITUTE Early Childhood Claremont COTTAGE MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood Fresno Additional Site: Lancaster EAST BAY MONTESSORI TRAINING Early Childhood Fremont FOUNTAINHEAD MONTESSORI ADULT EDUCATION Early Childhood Dublin MONTESSORI CENTER FOR TEACHER EDUCATION Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary II, Elementary I-II San Diego MONTESSORI HILLS ACADEMY TEACHER CERTIFICATION PROGRAM Early Childhood Chula Vista MONTESSORI INSTITUTE OF ADVANCED STUDIES Early Childhood Castro Valley MONTESSORI TEACHER ACADEMY Early Childhood Dana Point MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER/SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II San Leandro, San Mateo, Sunnyvale Additional Site: West Covina MONTESSORI TRAINING CENTER Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Shingle Springs UNIVERSITY MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM AT UC IRVINE Early Childhood Irvine COLORADO MONTESSORI EDUCATION CENTER OF THE ROCKIES Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II, Administrator Boulder DELAWARE DELAWARE INSTITUTE FOR MONTESSORI EDUCATION Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Hockessin MONTESSORI INSTITUTE FOR TEACHER EDUCATION Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Wilmington FLORIDA BARRY UNIVERSITY MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood, Elementary I-II Miami Shores DUHOVKA MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood, Elementary I-II Additional Site: Fernandina Beach MAITLAND MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Maitland MONTESSORI ACADEMY TRAINING INSTITUTE Early Childhood Pembroke Pines MONTESSORI TEACHER TRAINING INSTITUTE/MTTI Early Childhood Palmetto Bay ORLANDO MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION INSTITUTE Early Childhood Celebration PALM HARBOR MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER Early Childhood Tarpon Springs SUMMIT MONTESSORI TEACHER TRAINING INSTITUTE Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I Davie GEORGIA MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION INSTITUTE-ATLANTA Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Atlanta HAWAII CHAMINADE UNIVERSITY OF HONOLULU MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood Honolulu ILLINOIS MIDWEST MONTESSORI TEACHER TRAINING CENTER Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Evanston MONTESSORI HEARTLAND TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER Early Childhood Moline SETON MONTESSORI INSTITUTE Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Administrator Clarendon Hills INDIANA MONTESSORI TEACHER ACADEMY AT EDISON LAKES Early Childhood Mishawaka KENTUCKY GREATER CINCINNATI CENTER FOR MONTESSORI EDUCATION Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Covington MAINE MAINE MONTESSORI INSTITUTE Early Childhood Falmouth MARYLAND INSTITUTE FOR ADVANCED MONTESSORI STUDIES Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II, Administrator Silver Spring MARYLAND CENTER FOR MONTESSORI STUDIES Early Childhood Lutherville MONTGOMERY MONTESSORI INSTITUTE Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Rockville MASSACHUSETTS CAMBRIDGE MONTESSORI INSTITUTE Infant & Toddler Cambridge MONTESSORI ELEMENTARY TEACHER TRAINING COLLABORATIVE Elementary I, Elementary II, Elementary I-II Lexington MONTESSORI INSTITUTE - NEW ENGLAND Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Beverly NEW ENGLAND MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER Early Childhood Newton NORTHEAST MONTESSORI INSTITUTE Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Wenham MICHIGAN ADRIAN DOMINICAN MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION INSTITUTE Early Childhood Adrian MICHIGAN MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II, Elementary II Waterford MINNESOTA VIRGINIA MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER Early Childhood Additional Site: Excelsior MISSOURI HOPE MONTESSORI EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTE Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood St. Louis MONTANA MONTANA MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION INSTITUTE Early Childhood Kalispell NEBRASKA MID-AMERICA MONTESSORI TEACHER TRAINING INSTITUTE Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Omaha NEVADA MONTESSORI TRAINING OF SOUTHERN NEVADA Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Las Vegas NEW JERSEY MONTESSORI CENTER FOR TEACHER DEVELOPMENT Early Childhood Morristown MONTESSORI TEACHER TRAINING INSTITUTE OF MERCER COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE Early Childhood Robbinsville PRINCETON CENTER TEACHER EDUCATION Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II, Administrator Princeton WEST SIDE MONTESSORI SCHOOL TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Infant & Toddler Additional Site: Whitehouse Station NEW YORK BUFFALO MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood Clarence CENTER FOR MONTESSORI EDUCATION I NEW YORK Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Administrator New Rochelle WEST SIDE MONTESSORI SCHOOL TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II, Administrator New York City NORTH CAROLINA CENTER FOR MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION/NORTH CAROLINA Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Huntersville OHIO CINCINNATI MONTESSORI SECONDARY TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Secondary I, Secondary I-II Cincinnati COLUMBUS MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Columbus XAVIER UNIVERSITY MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Cincinnati OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA CITY UNIVERSITY MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood Oklahoma City OREGON MONTESSORI OF ALAMEDA TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Portland PENNSYLVANIA CHESTNUT HILL COLLEGE MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood Philadelphia PUERTO RICO INSTITUTO NUEVA ESCUELA Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II, Secondary I Rio Piedras SOUTH CAROLINA GULF COAST MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER Elementary I, Elementary I-II Additional Site: Charleston HOUSTON MONTESSORI CENTER Secondary I-II, Administrator Additional Site: Charleston LANDER UNIVERSITY MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood, Elementary II, Elementary I-II Greenwood NORTHEAST MONTESSORI INSTITUTE Early Childhood Additional Site: Mt. Pleasant SEACOAST CENTER FOR EDUCATION Elementary I, Elementary I-II Charleston TENNESSEE MONTESSORI TRAINING CENTER OF BRENTWOOD Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Brentwood TEXAS DALLAS MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Plano GULF COAST MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER Elementary I, Elementary I-II Houston HOUSTON MONTESSORI CENTER Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary II, Elementary I-II, Secondary I, Secondary I-II, Administrator Houston MONTESSORI DEVELOPMENT CENTER OF DFW Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Irving MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION INSTITUTE-HOUSTON Early Childhood Houston NORTH TEXAS MONTESSORI INSTITUTE Early Childhood Frisco SHELTON MONTESSORI TRAINING Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Dallas UTAH INSTITUTE FOR MONTESSORI INNOVATION AT WESTMINSTER COLLEGE Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary II, Elementary I-II, Administrator Salt Lake City VIRGINIA NORTHERN VIRGINIA MONTESSORI INSTITUTE Early Childhood Ashburn VIRGINIA CENTER FOR MONTESSORI STUDIES Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Richmond VIRGINIA MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER Early Childhood Chesapeake WASHINGTON MONTESSORI CENTER FOR TEACHER EDUCATION-WASHINGTON STATE Early Childhood Bellevue MONTESSORI EDUCATION INSTITUTE OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Bothell WISCONSIN UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN- RIVER FALLS MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II River Falls INTERNATIONAL BAISHAN MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION INSTITUTE Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Qingdao, CHINA BEIJING HEART & MIND MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Beijing, CHINA Early Childhood Additional Site: Yiwu, CHINA CADALIN GLOBAL EDUCATION Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Hsinchu City, TAIWAN CAPITAL COLLEGE Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Richmond, BC, CANADA CAPITAL EDUCATION INSTITUTE Early Childhood Additional Site: Nanning, CHINA CENTRE FOR ADVANCED MONTESSORI STUDIES-VANCOUVER Elementary I, Elementary I-II Vancouver, BC, CANADA CENTRO DE ENSEÑANZA MONTESSORI, A.C. Early Childhood Tijuana, BC, MEXICO CENTRO DE ENTRENAMIENTO MONTESSORI Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Monterrey, NL, MEXICO THE CHILDREN'S HOUSE MONTESSORI EDUCATION CENTER Early Childhood Beijing, CHINA DR. JUN INSTITUTE OF MONTESSORI EDUCATION Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Seoul, REPUBLIC OF KOREA DUHOVKA MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Prague, CZECH REPUBLIC ETONKIDS MONTESSORI TEACHER TRAINING ACADEMY Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Beijing, CHINA HOUSTON MONTESSORI CENTER Secondary I, Secondary I-II Additional Site: Prague, CZECH REPUBLIC INFINITY MONTESSORI ACADEMY OF HONG KONG Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, HONG KONG INTERNATIONAL MONTESSORI EDUCATION INSTITUTE Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Taichung City, TAIWAN INTERNATIONAL MONTESSORI TEACHING INSTITUTE Early Childhood Beijing, CHINA KOREAN INSTITUTE FOR MONTESSORI Early Childhood Seoul, REPUBLIC OF KOREA KOREAN MONTESSORI COLLEGE Early Childhood Seoul, REPUBLIC OF KOREA LMS MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood Windsor, ON, CANADA MONTESSORI INSTITUTE FOR TEACHER EDUCATION Early Childhood Additional Site: Istanbul, TURKEY MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER/SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA Infant & Toddler Additional Site: Taipei City, TAIWAN Early Childhood Additional Site: Kowloon Tong, HONG KONG NORTHEAST MONTESSORI INSTITUTE Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Additional Site: Chengdu, CHINA OKLAHOMA CITY UNIVERSITY MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood Additional Site: Taipei City, TAIWAN PALM HARBOR MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER Early Childhood Additional Site: Beijing, CHINA SHANGHAI MONTESSORI EDUCATION ACADEMY Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Administrator Shanghai, CHINA WEIMING MONTESSORI EDUCATION CENTRE Early Childhood Beijing, CHINA WEST SIDE MONTESSORI SCHOOL TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Infant & Toddler Additional Site: Beijing, CHINA

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Bachelor's Thesis

Perbedaan tingkat kemandirian anak Prasekolah di sekolah Montessori dengan sekolah non Montessori [Differences in the level of independence of preschool children in Montessori schools and non-Montessori schools]

Available from: CORE

Asia, Australasia, Comparative education, Indonesia, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Southeast Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Kemandirian adalah kemampuan seseorang untuk melakukan segala sesuatunya sendiri sesuai dengan tugas perkembangannya yang didasari oleh inisiatif, keinginan, kontrol diri dan kepercayaan pada kemampuannya sendiri. Anak perlu dilatih kemandiriannya sejak usia dini supaya tugas perkembangan dapat berkembang secara optimal. Sekolah memiliki peran penting untuk meningkatkan kemandirian anak. Menurut Santrock (2002:242), lingkungan bermain sangat penting dalam optimalisasi perkembangan anak. Salah satu sekolah dengan pendekatan seperti di atas adalah sekolah Montessori. Pendekatan Montessori menerapkan agar anak belajar mandiri dan tidak bertanya kepada guru atau menunggu jawaban (Hainstock 2008:38-40). Anak yang dididik dengan pendekatan Montessori diberi kesempatan untuk bekerja sendiri dengan material-material yang ada di lingkungannya, mengungkapkan keinginannya untuk memilih aktivitas, mengembangkan disiplin, dan anak perlu mengetahui apa yang baik dan buruk. Apabila hal-hal ini telah dipenuhi, maka kemandirian anak akan terbentuk (Modern Montessori International n.d.:40-41). Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui secara empiris ada tidaknya perbedaan tingkat kemandirian anak prasekolah di sekolah Montessori dengan sekolah non Montessori. Subjek penelitian (N=28) adalah anak prasekolah berusia 3-4 tahun yang bersekolah di sekolah Montessori “X” dan sekolah non Montessori “Y” Teknik pengambilan sampel menggunakan seluruh populasi playgroup 2. Pengambilan data menggunakan rating scale terhadap kemandirian anak di sekolah Montessori maupun di sekolah non Montessori. Data dianalisis dengan teknik Uji t (t-test). Nilai t = 0.364, dengan p = 0.720 (p > 0.05) yang berarti hipotesis penelitian ditolak. Hal ini berarti tidak ada perbedaan signifikan tingkat kemandirian anak prasekolah di sekolah Montessori “X” dengan sekolah non Montessori “Y”. [Independence is a person's ability to do things on their own in accordance with their developmental tasks based on initiative, desire, self-control and belief in their own abilities. Children need to be trained to be independent from an early age so that developmental tasks can develop optimally. Schools have an important role in increasing children's independence. According to Santrock (2002: 242), the play environment is very important in optimizing children's development. One of the schools with such an approach is the Montessori school. The Montessori approach applies so that children learn independently and do not ask the teacher or wait for answers (Hainstock 2008:38-40). Children who are educated with the Montessori approach are given the opportunity to work alone with materials in their environment, express their desire to choose activities, develop discipline, and children need to know what is good and bad. If these things have been fulfilled, then the child's independence will be formed (Modern Montessori International n.d.: 40-41). This study aims to determine empirically whether there are differences in the level of independence of preschool children in Montessori schools and non-Montessori schools. The research subjects (N=28) were preschoolers aged 3-4 years who attended Montessori schools "X" and non-Montessori schools "Y" The sampling technique used the entire playgroup population 2. Data collection used a rating scale on the independence of children in Montessori schools. as well as in non-Montessori schools. The data were analyzed by using the t-test technique (t-test). The value of t = 0.364, with p = 0.720 (p > 0.05) which means the research hypothesis is rejected. This means that there is no significant difference in the level of independence of preschool children in Montessori schools "X" with non-Montessori schools "Y"]

Language: Indonesian

Published: Surabaya, Indonesia, 2009

Article

Views on Montessori approach by teachers serving at schools applying the Montessori approach [Montessori yaklaşımını uygulayan okullarda çalışan öğretmenlerin Montessori yaklaşımına ilişkin görüşleri]

Available from: Eurasian Journal of Educational Research

Publication: Eurasian Journal of Educational Research [Egitim Arastirmalari], no. 66

Pages: 123-138

Asia, Middle East, Turkey, Western Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Problem Statement: Further studies on Montessori teachers are required on the grounds that the Montessori approach, which, having been applied throughout the world, holds an important place in the alternative education field. Yet it is novel for Turkey, and there are only a limited number of studies on Montessori teachers in Turkey. Purpose of Study: The aim was to investigate views on the Montessori approach by the teachers who serve at the schools applying the Montessori approach. Methods: Research data was collected by the basic qualitative research, one of the qualitative research methods. Descriptive analysis method was used in analysis of the qualitative data. Nine teachers serving at three different schools in Ankara province applying Montessori approach were interviewed. Findings and Results: Eight main themes were determined upon data analysis; namely, education on Montessori approach, basic qualities required for teachers applying Montessori approach, adequacy of education on Montessori approach, in-service training on the challenges experienced by Montessori teachers, plans of teachers for self-development, following existing studies in Turkey on Montessori approach, views on studies on Montessori approach, and views on the criticisms towards Montessori approach. Conclusions and Recommendations: All teachers confirmed that they internalized the approach upon training in line with Montessori philosophy. They emphasized that they received training covering all the educational fields, yet the implementation dimension was inadequate due to training without the involvement of children. Furthermore, they suggested that all the schools in Turkey were opened by commercial motives, and as such these schools failed to comply with the standards of the institutions providing education on the basis of Montessori approach. They asserted that all criticisms towards Montessori approach would be proved to be groundless upon implementation of the approach. It was seen that experienced supervisors, in-service training, and scientific studies on Montessori approach were required.

Language: English, Turkish

ISSN: 1302-597X, 2528-8911

Book

Evaluation of the Indianapolis Public Schools' Montessori Option (K-6) Pupil Progress Report

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Abstract/Notes: Parents and guardians of children in the Indianapolis Public Schools' Montessori Option Program for kindergartners through sixth graders were surveyed. Parents and guardians were surveyed on: (1) the pupil progress report, which was used on a pilot basis during the 1988-89 school year; (2) the Montessori method; (3) strengths and weaknesses of the program; and (4) changes the program needed. Questionnaires were sent to the households of 536 pupils and to 50 school staff members in the 3 Montessori Option elementary schools. Parents and guardians replied positively to 25 closed-ended questions; were neutral about none; and responded negatively to four. School staff replied positively to 27; were neutral about none; and responded negatively to two. Parents and guardians expressed concern about more than 46 survey-related topics. Parent-initiated topics included: competitiveness and comparison between students, curriculum design and development, learning environments, parent-teacher conferences, program expansion, public school use of Montessori philosophy, and staff certification and training. School staff expressed concern about classroom mangagement, instructional materials, parent involvement, parent-teacher conferences, skills and knowledge analysis, student progress, and the district-wide testing program. Questions and responses (along a Likert-type scale) are provided for parents and school staff members. Parents and guardians of children in the Indianapolis Public Schools' Montessori Option Program for kindergartners through sixth graders were surveyed. Parents and guardians were surveyed on: (1) the pupil progress report, which was used on a pilot basis during the 1988-89 school year; (2) the Montessori method; (3) strengths and weaknesses of the program; and (4) changes the program needed. The survey instrument consisted of a section on respondent characteristics, 32 closed-ended questions, and three open-ended questions. The five sections of the survey covered the evaluation key, report card headings and philosophy, report card delivery to parents and guardians, and basic principles of the Montessori method. The survey elicited parent opinions about the program. The households of 536 pupils and 50 school staff members in the 3 Montessori Option elementary schools received questionnaires. This main report describes survey methodology, reports results and conclusions, and offers recommendations. Related materials are appended. Parents and guardians of children in the Indianapolis Public Schools' Montessori Option Program for kindergartners through sixth graders were surveyed. Parents and guardians were surveyed on: (1) the pupil progress report, which was used on a pilot basis during the 1988-89 school year; (2) the Montessori method; (3) strengths and weaknesses of the program; and (4) changes the program needed. The survey instrument consisted of a section on respondent characteristics, 32 closed-ended questions, and 3 open-ended questions. The five sections of the survey introduced the topics of the evaluation key, report card headings and philosophy, report card delivery to parents and guardians, and basic principles of the Montessori method. The survey elicited parent opinions about the program. The households of 536 pupils and 50 school staff members in the 3 Montessori Option elementary schools received questionnaires. This appendix to the main report provides: (1) survey design input from parents, teachers, and others; (2) the Montessori Option Pupil Progress Report Survey; and (3) parent and teacher responses for each item.

Language: English

Published: Indianapolis, Indiana: Indianapolis Public Schools, 1989

of 3

Article

Montessori Activities in India [Besant Montessori School, Juhu; Montessori Training Centre, Adyar; Shishu Vihar Montessori School, Yeotmal, Berar]

Publication: The Montessori Magazine: A Quarterly Journal for Teachers, Parents and Social Workers (India), vol. 2, no. 2

Pages: 122-123

Annie Besant Montessori School (Juhu), Asia, India, Montessori Training Centre (Adyar), Shishu Vihar Montessori School (Yeotmal), South Asia

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Language: English

Article

Manajemen Pendidikan Karakter Metode Montessori di Jogjakarta Montessori School [Montessori Method of Character Education Management at Jogjakarta Montessori School]

Available from: Universitas Sarjanawiyata Tamansiswa

Publication: Media Manajemen Pendidikan [Educational Management Media], vol. 2, no. 2

Pages: 251-259

Asia, Australasia, Indonesia, Montessori method of education, Southeast Asia, ⚠️ Invalid DOI

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Abstract/Notes: Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui manajemen pendidikan karakter yang meliputi 1) perencanaan, 2) pengorganisasian, 3) pengarahan dan pelaksanaan, 4) evaluasi dan pengendalian, 5) faktor pendukung serta 6) faktor penghambat di SD Montessori. Penelitian ini menggunakan pendekatan deskriptif kualitatif. Teknik pengumpulan data dengan wawancara mendalam, observasi partisipatif, studi dokumentasi. Data dianalisis secara deskriptif kualitatif melalui tahapan pengumpulan data, reduksi data, penyajian data, dan penarikan kesimpulan. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa: 1) perencanaan manajemen pendidikan karakter pada kurikulum, pendidik, pembiayaan peserta didik, sarana dan prasarana, pembiayaan pendidikan; 2) pengorganisasian manajemen pendidikan karakter pada pelatihan guru baru, pengarahkan para guru, kesempatan bagi guru atau staf untuk berpartisipasi dalam memberikan sumbangan pikiran, mengikutsertakan yayasan, guru, staf dan komite sekolah dalam membuat perencanaan manajemen, memberikan nasehat dan arahan yang benar; 3) pelaksanaan manajemen pendidikan karakter sesuai dengan perencanaan dengan apparatus dan pendampingan dari guru; 4) evaluasi manajemen pendidikan karakter dengan melihat kemandirian dan keberanian, pembuatan project, berperilaku santun; 5) faktor pendukung meliputi kegiatan di luar sekolah bermasyarakat, kegiatan ektrakurikuler, peraturan untuk tidak memakai atribut keagamaan selama di sekolah, sarana dan prasarana sekolah, pendidik yang ramah dan perhatian, kegiatan sosial dan kerjasama dengan sekolah lain; 6) faktor penghambat pendidikan karakter pada Jogjakarta Montessori School yaitu kurangnya kerjasama orang tua siswa dalam menanamkan nilai kedisiplinan, tanggungjawab, menghargai prestasi, dan rasa ingin tahu. [This study aims to determine the management of character education which includes 1) planning, 2) organizing, 3) directing and implementing, 4) evaluation and control, 5) supporting factors and 6) inhibiting factors in SD Montessori. This research use desciptive qualitative approach. Data collection techniques are in-depth interviews, participatory observation, and documentation studies. Data were analyzed descriptively qualitatively through the stages of data collection, data reduction, data presentation, and drawing conclusions. The results showed that: 1) character education management planning in the curriculum, educators, student funding, facilities and infrastructure, education financing; 2) organizing character education management on new teacher training, directing teachers, opportunities for teachers or staff to participate in contributing ideas, involving foundations, teachers, staff and school committees in making management plans, providing correct advice and direction; 3) implementation of character education management in accordance with planning with apparatus and mentoring from teachers; 4) evaluation of character education management by looking at independence and courage, making projects, behaving politely; 5) supporting factors include activities outside of school in the community, extracurricular activities, regulations not to use religious attributes while at school, school facilities and infrastructure, friendly and caring educators, social activities and collaboration with other schools; 6) the inhibiting factor for character education at Jogjakarta Montessori School is the lack of cooperation between parents in instilling the values ​​of discipline, responsibility, respect for achievement, and curiosity.]

Language: Indonesian

DOI: 10.30738/mmp.v2i2.5072.g2662

ISSN: 2622-3694

Master's Thesis

蒙特梭利幼兒教育的幼兒就學準備度之研究 [The School Readiness of Montessori Early Childhood Education]

Available from: National Chengchi University Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Academic achievement, Asia, East Asia, Montessori method of education, Readiness for school, Taiwan

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori education has developed for over a century, mainly due to Montessori found the early childhood development principles and rules by the scientific method. She advocates child-centered,and there are three elements of Montessori education:(1)prepared environment, (2) teachers, (3) teaching aids, through the three to guide children's learning. However, in Taiwan, people worried about that Montessori education is lack of emotional, creativity , interpersonal learning, and the transition with primary education, therefore Montessori education is still being considered as an alternative education. In this regard, Montessori Teachers Association of the R.O.C pointed many longitudinal study shows that Montessori children perform better than the traditional-education children in many ways of academic achievements, active learning, interpersonal relationships, and emotional management. Nowadays, the concept of " school readiness " becomes more important, and the Ministry of Education is actively compiling the "Guidelines of Nursery Education Activities and Security Curriculum " which is particularly imply the importance of transition program. Thus, this study proposes to investigate Montessori education from the perspective of school readiness. First , researcher explored the common context of Montessori education and school readiness by document analysis, then based on the results to construct "The corresponding table of Montessori education and five-year-old children school readiness assessment “, and corrected the table by expert validity. Finally, assess the Montessori children's school readiness in actually. Data were analyzed by descriptive analysis, Crosstabs, Chi-square test, Pearson’s product -moment correlation, Spearman's rank correlation, t- test, and one way ANOVA. The results were summarized as follow: A."The corresponding table of Montessori education and five-year-old children school readiness assessment “ is highly corresponded, show they concerned the same capacity of children. Initially reflected Montessori education conform the basic development requirements of Taiwan early child education, and could help children get ready into primary school. B. Montessori children in this study sample get good school readiness. C. There is significant difference towards the school readiness between children study /non-study Montessori kindergarten. D. There is significant difference towards school readiness of “physical health and development domain”、”mathematical logic and cognitive science domain” between Montessori kindergartens and Montessori child care;there is no significant correlation between children’s school year in Montessori kindergarten and children’s school readiness;there is no significant difference towards the school readiness between boys and girls. E. There is significant correlation in “physical health and development domain”、”language and communicate domain”、” mathematical logic and cognitive science domain”、” cultural and artistic domain” and ” overall average” between school readiness and the years of teaching five-year classes (ambiguous age);there is significant correlation between school readiness and the highest degree of Montessori teachers;there is no significant difference towards the school readiness between the teachers with different Montessori teacher license.

Language: Chinese

Published: Taipei, Taiwan, 1999

Doctoral Dissertation

Academic Achievement: Montessori and Non-Montessori Private School Settings

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to describe the extent to which sixth grade elementary school students in Montessori school settings and sixth grade elementary school students in non-Montessori school settings differ with regard to academic achievement as measured by the Ninth Edition of the Stanford Achievement Test. Schools that are certified as "Montessori" must meet stringent requirements and although the Montessori philosophy has been implemented in the United States for a number of years, little research has documented its effectiveness, at least as based on students' scores on standardized tests. In the Rio Grande Valley, few Montessori schools are in place and even fewer administer such assessments. A causal-comparative research design with matched pairs was used to describe the difference in academic achievement of sixth grade elementary school students in Montessori school settings with sixth grade elementary school students in non-Montessori school settings. Archival data were analyzed using five separate t-tests for paired samples in which the raw scores for reading, mathematics, language arts, science, and social studies were the dependent variables for achievement for both sixth grade elementary school students in Montessori school settings and sixth grade elementary school students in non-Montessori school settings as measured by the ninth edition of the Stanford Achievement Test. The results indicate that the academic achievement in reading and mathematics of sixth grade elementary school students who have attended Montessori school settings is statistically significantly higher than the academic achievement in reading and mathematics of sixth grade elementary school students who have attended non-Montessori school settings. The knowledge gained from this study might assist educators and parents in search of the most effective education to offer children. It will also extend knowledge of Montessori and the effects that it has on the academic achievement of children.

Language: English

Published: Houston, Texas, 2008

Book Section

Maria Montessori en Inde: Adoption et Adaptation d’une Méthode Pédagogique [Maria Montessori in India: Adoption and Adaptation of a Pedagogic Method]

Available from: OpenEdition Books

Book Title: L’Inde et l’Italie: Rencontres intellectuelles, politiques et artistiques [India and Italy: Intellectual, political and artistic encounters]

Pages: 245-285

Asia, India, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: In this article I focus on the impact of the Maria Montessori’s pedagogical method during the years of her work in South Asia (1939-1946; 1947-1949). The genesis of this research started in the late 1980s during the years of my fieldwork in Madras (today Chennai), when I was amazed to find a large number of “Montessori” schools in that city. Certainly, they were many more than in Italy, and in Rome itself, where Maria Montessori founded the first “House of Children” on the 6th January 1907. Thus, out of mere curiosity I started to enquire about the reasons of such “implantation”. Soon I came to know that Maria Montessori (1870-1952) and her son, Mario Montesano Montessori (1898-1982), from 1939 till 1949, spent almost ten years in India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. In all those countries they collaborated and interacted with local pedagogists, by also training hundreds of children and more than thousand students and teachers to the homonimous “Montessori” pedagogical method. India, after Italy, was also the country where Maria Montessori spent the longest period of her life. After relating to the major events of her personal life as well as her scientific and social engagements as psychiatrist, pedagogist, outspoken feminist and antifascist, I deal here with the adoption and adaptation of her pedagogical method in South Asia. Finally, I tackle the influence of the local educational systems and cultural practices on Maria Montessori herself and on her own method’s further development. Due to such a synergic encouter and interaction, today India is one of the most dynamic and prestigeous international centers for the “Montessori” pedagogical method teachers’ training.,Dans cet article, j’étudie en particulier l’impact de la méthode pédagogique de Maria Montessori durant ses années en Asie du Sud (1939-1946, 1947-1949). La genèse de cette recherche a débuté à la fin des années 1980, quand j’ai été étonnée de trouver à Madras (Chennai) un si grand nombre d’écoles Montessori au cours de mon long terrain dans cette ville. Certes, elles étaient beaucoup plus nombreuses que celles présentes en Italie, et plus qu’à Rome même, où Maria Montessori fonda la première Maison des Enfants le 6 janvier 1907. Ainsi, par simple curiosité, je commençai à m’enquérir des raisons d’une telle « implantation ». Bientôt, j’ai réalisé que Maria Montessori (1870-1952) et son fils, Mario Montesano Montessori (1898-1982), avaient de 1939 à 1949, séjourné près de dix ans en Inde, au Pakistan et au Sri Lanka. Dans tous ces pays, ils ont collaboré et interagi avec les pédagogues locaux, en formant également des centaines d’enfants et plus de mille élèves et enseignants à la méthode pédagogique « Montessori ». L’Inde, après l’Italie, était aussi le pays où Maria Montessori a passé la plus longue période de sa vie. Après avoir évoqué les grands événements de sa vie personnelle ainsi que ses engagements scientifiques et sociaux en tant que psychiatre, pédagogue, féministe et antifasciste, je traite ici de l’adoption et de l’adaptation de sa méthode pédagogique en Asie du Sud. Enfin, j’analyse l’influence des systèmes éducatifs locaux et des pratiques culturelles sur Maria Montessori elle-même et sur le développement ultérieur de sa propre méthode. Grâce à cette rencontre et à cette interaction synergiques, l’Inde est aujourd’hui l’un des centres internationaux les plus dynamiques et les plus prestigieux pratiquant la méthode pédagogique Montessori.

Language: French

Published: Paris, France: OpenEdition Books, 2018

ISBN: 978-2-7132-3154-4

Series: Purushartha

Doctoral Dissertation

Preparation for Montessori School Leaders: A Look at Current Standards

Available from: University of Virginia

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Abstract/Notes: School leaders have been shown to make an important difference in the success of a school (e.g., Coelli & Green, 2012; Grissom & Loeb, 2011; Leithwood, Louis, Anderson, & Wahlstrom, 2004; Robinson, Lloyd, & Rowe, 2008). Research on the preparation of school leaders has grown tremendously since the 1980s, leading to the adoption of formal standards for school leaders in the mid-1990s (Young & Crow, 2017). Preparation for school leaders is often driven by standards (Young, Anderson, & Nash, 2017), and while one set of standards for the preparation of Montessori school leaders currently exists, it was unknown how well such standards aligned with the work of Montessori school leaders in a variety of school contexts. This descriptive mixed-methods study addressed this problem of practice through surveys of Montessori school leaders and surveys and interviews of directors of Montessori school leader preparation programs. Findings provided insight into the current preparation status and needs of Montessori school leaders, stakeholder perspectives regarding the knowledge and skill needs of Montessori school leaders, and stakeholder perspectives regarding the role of standards related to the preparation of Montessori school leaders. From these results, I provide recommendations for any organization concerned with the preparation of Montessori school leaders. These include: incorporating content and language from the Professional Standards for Educational Leaders into Montessori school leadership standards, utilizing change facilitation practices to support necessary changes, allowing for increased customization of preparation content for diverse Montessori school leaders, partnering Montessori school leader preparation programs with institutions of higher education, and strengthening the Montessori school leadership pipeline.

Language: English

Published: Charlottesville, Virginia, 2019

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