Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

578 results

Book

Creating the Multi-Age Classroom: Organization, Curriculum, Instructional Strategies and Assessment for the Multi-Age Classroom Plus Considerations for Getting Started and Techniques for Classroom Management

See More

Abstract/Notes: Intended for teachers who have asked for information on how to manage a multi-age classroom, this book outlines the ideal classroom as it exists when all of the multi-age components are put in place. Opening sections of the guide discuss creating the multi-age classroom, and the advantages and principles of multi-age instruction. The next sections provide overviews of classroom organization, instructional strategies, curriculum, assessment and evaluation, and getting started. Each of these sections includes the overview, results of the changes brought about by multi-age instruction, and advice from the experts. Additional sections address scheduling, grouping strategies, working with Bloom's taxonomy, projects for active learners, using novels for literature instruction, and helping children discover themselves and others. Separate sections address the management of mathematics, authentic assessment and evaluation, and student record forms, with sample forms included. A glossary of

Language: English

Published: Edmonds, Washington: CATS Publications, Apr 1995

Edition: Revised

ISBN: 1-886753-03-2

Article

School Rules [In a remote Queensland township of Woorabinda, an enterprising teacher is introducing Aboriginal students to some Montessori classroom techniques]

Available from: InformIT

Publication: The Big Issue, no. 323

Pages: 14-17

⛔ No DOI found

See More

Language: English

DOI: 10.3316/ielapa.200903570

ISSN: 1326-639X

Report

Effects of the Multiage Classroom on Children

Available from: ERIC

See More

Abstract/Notes: This study examined the impact of the multiage classroom on second, third, and fourth graders in an Elkhart, Indiana elementary school. One classroom from each grade participated in the multiage classroom. The classroom of 70 students was combined for at least 1 afternoon per week during the 1995-96 school year. During February, the classroom was combined for four afternoons per week. Results indicated that students in the multiage group had better attendance than the general school population. To determine the effects of the multiage classroom on social skills, the teachers maintained a journal on six students who had not shown appropriate social behaviors in the regular classroom. A point system was implemented in which these students were rewarded with points for three desirable social skills. Four of the six target students demonstrated appropriate social skills during the time observed. Parents' responses to surveys suggested that the parents accepted the program and had a positive attitude toward it. At the beginning and end of the study period, children were surveyed orally on their attitudes to the multiage classroom. Results were mixed with regard to whether they liked to be in a multiage class. Sociometric techniques revealed that, across the time of the study, second and third graders' willingness to work with children of other ages increased, and the fourth graders' willingness declined. Appendixes contain the parent and student surveys. (KDFB)

Language: English

Published: Elkhart, Indiana, Apr 24, 1996

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Managing the Use of Resources in Multi-Grade Classrooms

Available from: African Journals Online

Publication: South African Journal of Education, vol. 39, no. 3

Africa, Classroom environment, Montessori materials, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Nongraded schools, Prepared environment, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa

See More

Abstract/Notes: This study examined how teachers in multi-grade classrooms manage and use available resources in their classrooms. The study focused on multi-grade classrooms in farm schools in the Free State province of South Africa that cover Grades 1 to 9. The concepts “multi-grade classrooms” and “resources” are explained below. The availability and utilisation of resources in multi-grade classrooms is discussed in some depth. A qualitative research design was used to collect data. Interviews were conducted with 9 teachers who worked in multi-grade classrooms. The data reveals that the availability of resources has improved somewhat in the multi-grade classrooms surveyed; however, textbooks specifically meant for multi-grade classrooms are still lacking. The data also points to several other trends. For example, most multi-grade schools in the sample have insufficient resources. Where available, the resources are either under-utilised or used improperly. Furthermore, it is usually the case that learners are required to share resources across various grades. Moreover, teachers often use their personal resources to get their work done, and in this regard, smartphones play an important part. Finally, the study also reveals that teachers do try to use various types of resources to cater for different learning styles.Keywords: activity centres; classroom organisation; Montessori educational theory; multi-grade classrooms; resource corners; resources

Language: English

DOI: 10.15700/saje.v39n3a1599

ISSN: 2076-3433

Conference Paper

Strategies for Developing Multi-Age Classrooms

Available from: ERIC

Annual Convention of the National Association of Elementary School Principals Association (Orlando, FL, March 4-9, 1994)

See More

Abstract/Notes: This paper traces the development of graded and non-graded classrooms in the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries and describes the implementation of multiage classrooms at an elementary school in Hopedale, Massachusetts. After defining what is meant by multiage classrooms, the paper discusses the role of Horace Mann, who was then a secretary for the Massachusetts Board of Education, in implementing the first graded classrooms in the United States in the 1840s. It also reviews early criticisms of graded education, especially those voiced by John Dewey, who felt that graded classrooms were too confining and machine-like. The paper then addresses the influences on the move back to nongraded or multiage classrooms in the late 20th century, reviews recent research on multiage instruction, and presents the educational benefits of multiage classrooms. Finally, the personal experiences of an elementary school principal responsible for the implementation of multiage classrooms at

Language: English

Holistic Reading in a Montessori Classroom: An Examination of the Reading Miscues and Perceived Strategies of Children Who Have Completed One Year in a Montessori Elementary Classroom

See More

Language: English

Published: Chicago, Illinois, 1992

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Building a Cohesive Classroom: The Effects of Music on Cooperation and Community in a Public, Lower Elementary, Montessori Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Lower elementary, Montessori method of education, Public Montessori

See More

Abstract/Notes: The following research assesses how the daily integration of singing and listening to music helps to construct a socially cohesive, cooperative and joyful classroom during clean up time. This study combined group singing opportunities, a music listening station and music played during clean up time. The songs used for this study included lyrical themes of cooperation, happiness, overcoming obstacles and/or friendship. The thirty-day study involved twenty-one participants between the ages of six and nine at a public, Montessori school in Missouri. Each individual completed a pre- and post-survey, as well as a survey each time they used the music listening station. During clean up time, observations were taken daily to record instances of helpful behaviors and joy amongst the participants. Results of the surveys showed that the intervention was successful at increasing positive experiences during clean up time and including a Music Listening Station as an available work choice. The intervention was not successful in creating positive experiences when singing together as a group. Further research may include the use of other mediums to promote community and collaboration like the fine arts, sports or other group oriented activities.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2019

Doctoral Dissertation

Pre-Kindergarten Classroom Practices in Oklahoma Public Schools: Influence of Teacher and Principal Beliefs and Characteristics

Available from: SHAREOK

beliefs, dispositions

See More

Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was two-fold: 1) to examine the relations between pre-kindergarten (pre-K) teachers' characteristics, belief in developmentally appropriate practices (DAP), and DAP classroom practices and 2) to examine the relations between principals' characteristics, DAP and testing beliefs, and preferred pre-K classroom practices. Sixty-six principals and 63 pre-K teachers from public schools in small districts (districts with only one elementary school) in Oklahoma participated. Principals and teachers completed questionnaires containing DAP, demographic, and time allocation information. Data were analyzed using correlations and regressions.Findings and Conclusions: In the study of teachers, number of child development courses taken (r=-.29) and number of years experience teaching pre-K (r=.30) were related to DAP beliefs. The relation of DAP beliefs to DAP classroom practices was moderated by teacher's beliefs in the importance of obedience; DAP beliefs and practices were positively related for teachers with lower belief in the importance of child obedience. In the study of principals, principals' ECE courses taken (r=.36), ECE state test certification (r=.59), elementary certification (r=.34), number of years as a principal (r=-.25), years teaching preschoolers (r=.35), experience teaching 4th to 6th grades (r=-.35), and years teaching 4th to 6th grades (r=-.30) were related to principals' beliefs in DAP. Principals' ECE state certification (r=.41), ECE courses taken (r=.27), and years teaching 4th to 6th grades (r=-.33) were related to preferred DAP classroom practices and experience teaching 1st to 3rd grades (r=-.29) was related to use of workbooks and worksheets. DAP beliefs (r=.60) were significantly related to preferred DAP classroom practices. Testing beliefs were not related to principal characteristics or preferred classroom practices. The relation between the number of early childhood courses taken by principals and preferred DAP classroom practices was mediated by principals' beliefs in DAP.

Language: English

Published: Stillwater, Oklahoma, 2010

Doctoral Dissertation

The Characteristics of Problem Solving Transfer in a Montessori Classroom

Available from: Baylor University Libraries

See More

Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this case study was to examine the use of problem solving strategies and instruction within the Montessori model of learning and to determine if problem solving and transfer occurred. The following research questions were investigated: (1) What Montessori model characteristics are similar to the characteristics reported in the problem solving research which facilitate transfer? (2) In what ways does problem solving within the Montessori classroom transfer? (3) What are the factors that influence problem solving transfer in a Montessori classroom? The site for the study was a fourth through sixth grade level classroom in a private, non-profit Montessori school. Participating in the research were 16 students, two teachers, and a parent of each of the students. The study was conducted over a eight month time period. Data collection and analysis involved both qualitative and quantitative methods. The qualitative data were gathered through video-taping of 24 classroom lessons, audio-taping interviews with the students, teachers, and parents and curriculum document analysis. Quantitative instruments included the TONI-3: Test of Nonverbal Intelligence, 3rd Edition, the Problem Solving and Thinking Processes scale, the Flanders Interaction Analysis Categories-Modified, and the Engagement Check. These are the findings: (a) as implemented in this study, the Montessori model of learning, did incorporate instructional strategies that facilitated problem solving and transfer; (b) instances of problem solving, problem solving transfer, and knowledge transfer did occur; and (c) six specific instructional and curriculum strategies influenced the opportunities for problem solving and transfer in the classroom. This research contributes to the field by studying transfer with elementary age students in the natural setting of a classroom and by providing a framework for examining the factors which encourage problem solving.

Language: English

Published: Waco, Texas, 2002

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effect of Teacher Interactions on Classroom Management in a Montessori Environment

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

See More

Abstract/Notes: The investigation was intended to find the effect of teacher interactions on classroom control and management in a Montessori environment. The research was conducted in three Montessori classrooms of early childhood: two primary and one toddler, in a private school. The participants were the lead teachers of each classroom and selected parents who have had two or more children in different classrooms. The data collection instruments used were observations and interviews with teachers, surveys with parents, analyzing student records and student work samples. The data showed that positive teacher interactions and positive usage of language had a great impact on classroom management and negative interactions and poor communications had a negative effect on classroom management. Further, the teachers had better control and management of the classroom if they had more knowledge of Montessori principles and adhered to those guidelines. The result of the research indicates that teachers who had more training, experience and knowledge may have better classroom management and also the capability to work within Montessori guidelines and principles.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2014

Advanced Search