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34 results

Master's Thesis

Patterns of Concentration in Montessori Preschools: Investigating Concentration When Children are Free to Choose Their Own Work

Available from: University of Virginia

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Abstract/Notes: One key characteristic of Montessori classrooms is that children freely choose to engage with whatever they are most interested in. A common concern about Montessori is thus whether students will concentrate on their work throughout the day, and even whether they will actually choose to work at all. We completed 115 observations of children in Montessori Primary classrooms (ages 3-6), coding for children’s concentration and activity across two to three hours in the morning. The best fitting model of concentration across time was a quartic model, including age. This model indicated that 3-year-olds had two bouts of concentration, with a brief period of fatigue mid-morning. Four-year-olds showed an increased ability to concentrate across the entire morning, with minimal indication of fatigue. Five-year-olds showed a higher level of concentration than their younger peers, and were able to concentrate longer than the 3-year-olds, but this was followed by a period of fatigue. These findings are in line with Montessori theory, and suggest that children do freely choose to concentrate on their work. In regard to activities that children chose to do, we found children choose to spend a majority of the time engaged in work. Further, children distributed their time across all areas of the classroom, indicating that choice does not limit their exposure to any one area of learning.

Language: English

Published: Charlottesville, Virginia, 2020

Article

M. Montessori no gainen" Concentration" ni kansuru shōron / M. Montessori の概念"Concentration"に関する小論 [An Essay on Maria Montessori's Concept of "Concentration"]

Available from: National Diet Library (Japan)

Publication: Nihon hoiku gakkai taikai kenkyū happyō ronbun shōroku / 日本保育学会大会研究発表論文抄録 [Abstracts of papers presented at the Annual Meeting of the Japan Society of Early Childhood Education], no. 26

Pages: Article 1-102 (2 pages)

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Language: Japanese

Video Recording

Spontaneous Concentration in the Montessori Prepared Environment

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Abstract/Notes: Viewers are asked to observe a class of children and record evidence of spontaneous concentration or concentration events. Viewers are asked to be objective and open minded in their observations.

Runtime: 16 minutes

Language: English

Published: Burton, Ohio, 2004

Master's Thesis

The Effects of Nature on Concentration in Preschool: A Montessori Context

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

Work periods

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Abstract/Notes: This study explored the effects of nature’s environment on attention fatigue restoration, and consequently the regulation of attention in preschool students through a Montessori perspective. The purpose of this study was to further evaluate how effective the attention restoration theory (ART) is for preschool students’ attention fatigue and, consequently, concentration. In addition, this study examined the implications ART has on developing independent attention sustainability in the context of the work period practiced in Montessori pedagogy. The retrospective interview of a Montessori teacher who has taught both indoors and outdoors provided content for further discussion about outdoor learning and its effects on concentration. In conclusion, there seems to be a positive influence on preschool students’ ability to concentrate on a task while working outdoors vs. indoors.

Language: English

Published: Moraga, California, 2022

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Purposeful Physical Activity on Student Concentration in a Montessori Children's House

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Work periods

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this action research was to determine the impact of purposeful gross-motor movements on student concentration in a Montessori Children’s House. The intervention took place over a period of eight weeks in a private Montessori school in a “Children’s House” of 20 primary aged children (ages 2.5 to 6). Data was collected using hourly observations of the concentration levels of the class as a whole prior to and after implementation; tally sheets reflecting daily use of movement materials, daily reflective journals, and interviews with the children. Results show concentration levels were positively affected by the use of the movement materials. Although there was not much change observed, the intervention appeared to help concentration levels remain more consistent throughout the work period. Further research might include the effects of movement materials on comprehension and decreasing undesirable classroom behaviors.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2016

Article

Enacting Attention: Concentration and Shared Focus in Montessori Classrooms

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 24, no. 4

Pages: 18-20, 22-26

Work periods

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Abstract/Notes: Concentration is a "sine qua non," a hallmark, of a Montessori Casa program. Yet, it happens that some children do not concentrate. They do not engage with the materials in the classic pattern of normalization. They are not challenged by ADD, ADHD, or a variant of sensory integration spectrum disorder. Instead of working alone, they prefer the company of others; they prefer to learn with others. One may wonder if their natural intelligence is interpersonal. Based on studies of brain development and findings from recent ethnographic research, this article describes a type of attention called "shared focus." Ethnographic research was conducted in Casa classrooms, located in four Montessori schools, during a 3-year period, beginning in 2008. The research involved observing classrooms and interviewing school staff, teachers, and children. "Children who do not concentrate" was a common concern raised by the teachers in those classrooms. A review of brain development research suggests concentration is a type of attention. Children may use a type of attention called shared focus when, for example, they laugh and run together on the playground, and when they leave their parents during morning arrival. Some children may also more naturally use this type of attention instead of concentration during the work period. (Contains 1 table.)

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Movement Interventions on Focus and Concentration in Toddler Montessori Classrooms

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Three-hour work cycle, Work periods

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this action research was to determine the effects of movement activities on focus and concentration in toddler Montessori classrooms. Evidence supports the connection between purposeful movement and levels of concentration. Both quantitative and qualitative data of three toddler-aged classes was collected through the use of a pre and post questionnaires, checklists and observational record keeping. The intervention took place over a period of six weeks at an independent school setting with 24 students ages 21 months to 3 years. The results showed the students focus and concentration levels increased during the Montessori uninterrupted morning work cycle when intentional movement lessons or activities were introduced. Based on the data, there is a correlation between movement intervention activities and concentration levels. Additional research should be conducted over an extended period of time to better study the effects of movement on focus, concentration, and behavior in the classroom.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2016

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Improving Student Concentration Through Caregiver Education

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Three-hour work cycle, Work periods

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Abstract/Notes: This action research was conducted in a primary classroom at a Montessori school. Using caregiver education that focused on the importance of limiting screen time, it aimed to increase student concentration during the work cycles. The research collected data through pre and post caregiver attitude scales and questionnaires as well as concentration and observation logs during the morning work cycles. Utilizing both qualitative and quantitative research methods, the data revealed a successful intervention with an increase in student concentration. This study can serve as a framework for future research projects that look at how caregiver education, focusing on different topics, can positively impact a child’s development. This study provided evidence that intentional caregiver education, that both informs and helps build a strong school-family relationship, can support the students’ concentration levels and therefore their development and success in the classroom.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2022

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Using Nature-Based Space and Materials on the Children's Concentration Levels in an Early Childhood Montessori Environment

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This research study explored the effects of using nature-based space and materials on the children’s concentration levels in an early childhood Montessori environment. Nineteen 3-6-year-olds participated in the study for four weeks. The researcher designed and implemented two interventions, nature-based space and nature-based materials, inside an early childhood Montessori environment. The purpose was to holistically improve the children’s concentration levels by being exposed to a nature-based area and materials. The data collection process relied on four qualitative and quantitative data tools: tally sheets, general observational notes, rate sheets, and measurement notes. The data analyzed in this research study suggests exposing young children to both nature-based space and materials in the learning environment is beneficial to their concentration levels. Lastly, the researcher considers further investigation of the effects of being exposed to nature and technology on the children’s brain by using scientific devices to read and interpret the brain activity.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2020

Article

Strategies to Support Concentration

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 42, no. 2

Pages: 45-60

North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Abstract/Notes: Annette Haines provides a comprehensive overview of concentration across the planes. She first lays the foundation for thinking about student engagement: It must be understood that concentration is found through the interest of the child, which is guided by the sensitive periods. When we understand the child's development in this way, we can offer the most likely "hooks" to catch the child's interest and create engagement. Haines offers examples of hooks at each plane. Along the way she weaves in the science of the brain to further enhance understanding of the development of the young child and to reinforce the "why" behind behavior. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled Finding the Hook: Montessori Strategies to Support Concentration, October 6-9, 2016, in Columbia, MD.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

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