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498 results

Book

Dissolving Boundaries: Toward an Integrative Curriculum

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: An examination of the issues surrounding the concept of change is fundamental to curriculum improvement for elementary and middle schools. New beliefs surround an integrative rather than a separate subject isolation approach to curriculum. This report examines past, current, and future curriculum practice and considerations, focusing on a new vision of the middle level curriculum as an integrated curriculum. Chapters are: (1) "The Process of Curriculum Development"; (2) "A Rationale for Curriculum Integration"; (3) "The Curriculum Continuum: Moving Where You Need To Be"; (4) "Integrated Studies for Multi-Age Classrooms: Solon Elementary School, Maine"; (5) "Hand-Crafting an Integrated Curriculum: Timothy Edwards Middle School: South Windsor, Connecticut"; (6) "One District's Perspective: Staff Development Stimulates Curriculum Integration: Blue Valley, Kansas"; (7) "First Steps toward Curriculum Integration: Using Student Questions: Ashland Middle School, Maine"; (8) "Twenty Years

Language: English

Published: Columbus, Ohio: National Middle School Association, 1995

ISBN: 1-56090-090-3

Doctoral Dissertation

Access to the General Early Childhood Curriculum: An Investigation of Participation in the Montessori Early Childhood Curriculum and Provided Instructional Supports

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: This study investigated factors that affect access to the general early childhood education curriculum of 4 kindergarten-aged children with disabilities attending an inclusive Montessori program; it replicated with adaptations, components of a previous study on access. Factors included curriculum participation, engagement, type of involvement, and provided instructional supports. Quantitative and qualitative methods were employed to analyze video data of each child recorded during the daily open work period. The children in the present study exhibited slightly higher engagement and received more instructional supports than in the previous study. The general conclusions were that the 4 children participated in the Montessori curriculum to varying degrees due to a complex set of associated factors related to child characteristics, teacher skills, instructional support, and attributes of the Montessori educational approach.

Language: English

Published: Lawrence, Kansas, 2008

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Integrating Curriculum; Negotiating Curriculum

Available from: JSTOR

Publication: The Reading Teacher, vol. 49, no. 1

Pages: 60-62

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Abstract/Notes: Examines negotiated curriculum and the teacher's framing questions when helping students design curriculum. Offers examples from a multiage classroom of seven- to nine-year-old students. (SR)

Language: English

ISSN: 0034-0561

Conference Paper

Teachers Initiating Change towards More Flexible Curriculum Practices

Available from: ERIC

International Conference on Early Education and Development (21st, Hong Kong, July 31-August 4, 1989)

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Abstract/Notes: This early childhood curriculum study focused on the practical understandings that teachers held about their classroom experiences, as a way of gaining access to the dynamics of curriculum implementation and innovation. Two problems were addressed: (1) the lack of knowledge about the dynamics of curriculum implementation in settings where early childhood curriculum practices were regarded as innovative by a significant proportion of participants; and (2) the need to assist other teachers in their attempts to learn about curriculum implementation. Two research questions provided general guidance for the study. First, what did innovative teachers consider to be important actions and events affecting their work during the early stages of change toward a flexible, developmentally responsive curriculum? Second, how could information gained from these teachers be used to assist other early childhood teachers and student teachers interested in curriculum implementation? Phase 1 of the

Language: English

Article

Understanding Curriculum: Why It Is Important to Have an Understanding of Curriculum Theory in the Montessori Context

Publication: Montessori Leadership, vol. 15, no. 2

Pages: 10-14

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Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation

The Montessori Elementary Curriculum Content and the Corresponding American Curriculum: A Cross-Cultural Study

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., 1958

Book Section

Montessori Curriculum Resources and School Implementation - The Prepared Environment, Overviews, Activity Summaries, Montessori Equipment Summaries, Curriculum Support Materials, Other Materials to Buy, Other Materials to Make, Montessori Suppliers

Available from: ERIC

Book Title: Implementing Montessori Education in the Public Sector

Pages: 27-141

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Language: English

Published: Cleveland, OH: North American Montessori Teachers' Association, 1990

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

An Investigation of the Expressive and Representational Drawing Development in National Curriculum, Steiner, and Montessori Schools

Available from: APA PsycNet

Publication: Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts, vol. 6, no. 1

Pages: 83-95

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Abstract/Notes: Little is known about how children’s drawing ability may vary between different educational approaches. This study investigated the expressive and representational drawing ability of British National Curriculum, Steiner, and Montessori pupils aged 5 to 9 years old. Ability was measured from performance on specified drawing tasks. One hundred and 35 children participated, 45 from each educational establishment consisting of 15 from each of the three age groups, 5-, 7- and 9-year-olds. Participants completed three expressive drawings (depicting a happy, sad, and angry mood) and three representational drawings (observational drawing of a wooden mannequin, a house from memory and a free drawing). Results indicated that for expressive drawings Steiner pupils generally depicted more content themes, used formal properties more expressively, and produced higher quality expressive drawings than Montessori and National Curriculum pupils. Where there were differences between National Curriculum and Montessori pupils the Montessori children tended to do better than the National Curriculum pupils on these measures. Although representational drawing development varied in younger Steiner pupils compared to their National Curriculum and Montessori peers, no differences were observed among the oldest children attending the three schools. The positive relationship between expressive and representational drawing performance was the strongest in Steiner pupils. The results suggest the art program in Steiner education is more conducive to nurturing expressive drawing ability than those delivered in Montessori and National Curriculum education, with seemingly no disadvantage in representational drawing ability in the primary school years.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1037/a0024460

ISSN: 1931-3896, 1931-390X

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Using the Cosmic Curriculum of Dr. Montessori Toward the Development of a Place-Based Indigenous Science Program

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 7, no. 2

Cosmic education, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples

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Abstract/Notes: Indigenous educators desire to use culturally restorative and decolonized pedagogies reflective of their own cultural values and beliefs in their science programs but have lacked models for how to start. They also often lack confidence in their ability to teach the sciences. This three-year qualitative case study used grounded theory methodology to discover (a) how Hawaiian language immersion (HLC) K–6 educators used Maria Montessori’s Cosmic Curriculum for the creation of a science program based on Hawaiian epistemology and cultural values and (b) why the Cosmic Curriculum appealed to the HLC educators. Five key themes emerged: (a) the notion of creation as interconnected and relational, (b) an epistemological similarity regarding how people learn, (c) using timelines as organizing cognitive structures, (d) a focus on the natural sciences, and (e) the use of storytelling and key lessons to engage students. Participants stated that they felt successful in creating science curriculum and teaching the sciences as they adapted the above aspects of Dr. Montessori’s Cosmic Curriculum. Future research should be conducted to discover if her Cosmic Curriculum can be adapted for use in other types of non-Montessori program and whether this kind of science program could encourage students to choose the sciences as a career choice.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v7i2.15763

ISSN: 2378-3923

Doctoral Dissertation

The Effects of Multiple External Mandates on Curriculum, Pedagogy and Child Activity in the Preschool Classroom

Available from: University of Massachusetts - Scholar Works

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Abstract/Notes: Within the last decade, the pressures of implementing state mandated early learning guidelines and meeting the requirements from federal, state and local agencies, have taken their toll on many preschool programs. In the present study, preschool programs were given a chance to voice their opinions about how curriculum standards and other external mandates were directly and indirectly influencing curriculum planning, teaching practices, and child activity. A brief survey was sent to 90 preschool directors in a region in Massachusetts, 28 directors completed this survey. A sample of nine directors, from the survey respondents, volunteered to be interviewed. In two separate interviews the researcher asked a series of questions to obtain data from the participants. These interview questions focused on how the participants made sense of the mandatory integration of early learning standards and other external mandates into their preschool program and their concerns based on their role as a preschool director. The results of the study revealed that external guidelines set forth by the state and federal government were a great concern to the preschool directors. These directors agreed that curriculum mandates were necessary yet the amount of work, time and expenditure needed to meet the demands of these mandates could be quite overwhelming. Concerns were particularly relevant in the areas of obtaining or maintaining NAEYC accreditation and the push for a standardized curriculum and/or a standardized assessment tool. To recieve specific types of funding, a program must be using a standardized assessment tool. Many funding sources also require that a program be accredited by NAEYC. The financial and physical expense of both of these requirements was prohibitive . The results were analyzed with respect to child development and early childhood education principles. The findings indicated that curriculum mandates focused primarily on young children’s cognitive development to the detriment of social and emotional competence. The findings also indicated that children were being pressured to spend more time on narrow academic skills and less time on play. Yet play has been found to provide children with opportunities to interact socially, express and control emotions, and develop symbolic thinking skills (Nicolopoulou, 2010).

Language: English

Published: Amherst, Massachusetts, 2011

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