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Doctoral Dissertation

A Comparison of Academic Achievement of Students Taught by the Montessori Method and by Traditional Methods of Instruction in the Elementary Grades

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: The problem of this study was to determine if there is a significant difference between the academic achievement scores of students in grades 2 through 5 who are taught with the Montessori method of instruction and those students who are taught with traditional methods of instruction in the Helena Public Schools. Analyses used a two-way ANOVA; method and gender as well as method and aptitude were examined. The level of significance was set at alpha =.05. A matching technique was used to match Montessori students with students from traditional classrooms by the independent variables of grade, aptitude, gender, socioeconomic conditions, and handicapping conditions. The study also examined if there was a significant difference between the aptitude of all students in Montessori classrooms and all students in traditional classrooms. The population studied was second, third, fourth, and fifth grade students during the spring of 1996. A total of 120 students was used in the study of academic achievement. There were 145 F-tests conducted in this study. At the second grade level, students from traditional classrooms scored significantly higher than students in Montessori classrooms in mathematics computation and mathematics concepts and applications. Also at the second grade, when aptitude was taken into consideration, Montessori low aptitude students scored significantly higher in vocabulary than low aptitude students in traditional classrooms. There were no significant findings in any of the subtests at the third and fourth grade levels. At the fifth grade level, Montessori students scored significantly higher in language expression and social studies. Interaction was found with aptitude in language expression and with gender in science. A comparison of the aptitude of all Montessori students to all students from traditional classrooms revealed that Montessori students scored significantly higher. The overall results of this study show that the Montessori method of instruction and the traditional method of instruction provide students with comparable achievement test scores. A longitudinal study is recommended to examine the long-term effects of academic achievement of those students taught by the Montessori method of instruction.

Language: English

Published: Bozeman, Montana, 1997

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Differences in Mathematics Scores Between Students Who Receive Traditional Montessori Instruction and Students Who Receive Music Enriched Montessori Instruction

Available from: University of California eScholarship

Publication: Journal for Learning Through the Arts, vol. 3, no. 1

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Abstract/Notes: While a growing body of research reveals the beneficial effects of music on education performance the value of music in educating the young child is not being recognized. If research of students in the school system indicates that learning through the arts can benefit the ‘whole’ child, that math achievement scores are significantly higher for those students studying music, and if Montessori education produces a more academically accomplished child, then what is the potential for the child when Montessori includes an enriched music curriculum? The decision to support music cannot be made without knowing music’s effect on academic achievement and its contribution to a student’s education. This study was an experimental design using a two-group post-test comparison. A sample of 200 Montessori students aged 3-5 years-old were selected and randomly placed in one of two groups. The experimental treatment was an “in-house” music enriched Montessori program and children participated in 3 half-hour sessions weekly, for 6 months. The instrument used to measure mathematical achievement was the Test of Early Mathematics Ability-3 (Barody & Ginsburg) to determine if the independent variable, music instruction had any effect on students’ math test scores. The results showed that subjects who received music enriched Montessori instruction had significantly higher math scores and when compared by age group, 3 year-old students had higher scores than either the 4 year-old or 5 year-old children. This study shows that an arts-rich curriculum has a significant positive effect on young students academic achievement.This comprehensive research presents developmentally appropriate early education curriculum for children from 2 through 6 years old and addresses some of the most compelling questions about early experience, such as how important music is to early brain development. Contemporary theories and practices of music education including strategies for developing pitch, vocal, rhythmic, instrumental, listening, movement and creative responses in children are presented. It explores the interrelationship of music and academic development in children, and demonstrates how music can enhance and accelerate the learning process. This study combines the best of research and practical knowledge to give teachers the necessary tools to educate tomorrow's musicians. It is essential reading for all students and teachers of young children.

Language: English

DOI: 10.21977/D93110059

ISSN: 1932-7528

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Teachers' and University Students' Evaluation of Chosen Didactic Materials According to the Maria Montessori Pedagogy / Učiteljska i studentska procjena odabranoga didaktičkog materijala prema pedagogiji Marije Montessori

Available from: University of Zagreb

Publication: Croatian Journal of Education - Hrvatski časopis za odgoj i obrazovanje, vol. 17, no. 3

Pages: 755-782

Cosmic education, Croatia, Europe, Montessori materials, Montessori schools, Southern Europe

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Abstract/Notes: The goal of this research was to explore teachers' and university students' perceptions of material, cognitive and affective-motivational characteristics as well as the acceptance of didactic materials used in Montessori schools. It has been found that both teachers and university students are not familiar enough with alternative pedagogical concepts and believe there's an insufficient number of them in Croatia. While teachers prefer Cosmic Education and Mathematics materials, university students like Language Education materials more, although teachers show more willingness to use Language Education materials in teaching whereas university students use Cosmic Education materials more readily. Both university students and teachers find it most demanding to make Cosmic Education materials, but they also believe such materials to be most concrete. The results have shown that both university students and teachers are more willing to use in teaching such positively evaluated examples of Montessori didactic materials, which have been explored in this research, when they believe them to be valuable, desirable, necessary and useful.

Language: English, Croatian

DOI: 10.15516/cje.v17i3.1054

ISSN: 1848-5189, 1848-5197

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Peer Collaboration on Students’ Writing Skills and Their Attitude Towards Writing in a Hybrid Montessori Classroom of Second and Third Grade Students

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Lower elementary, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this technology-integrated research is to understand the effects peer collaboration has on students writing skills on 2nd and 3rd graders in a virtual setting. The research took place over five weeks in a lower elementary classroom in a private Montessori school in New England area. The population included 18 students ages 8 to 9. Students participated in a 5-week intervention process, working in groups of 3 on peer collaboration, sharing ideas, and creating group written work. The findings indicate an overall beneficial effect on children’s attitude towards writing, leading to better writing skills and communication skills. Collaborative writing in a technology-integrated platform positively impacted students’ typing skills. Continued research is necessary to assess additional domains such as cognitive improvement, vocabulary effects, and students’ specific writing skills.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2021

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Montessori Mathematics Curriculum and Lower Elementary Students Understanding of Length Measurement

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Lower elementary, Mathematics education

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Abstract/Notes: The intent of this action research project was to determine to what extent the Montessori Mathematics curriculum support lower elementary students’ understanding of length measurement. The research took place in a private Montessori school classroom with first and second-grade students. There were 22 students in the class, 11 first graders, and 11 second-graders. Data was collected through a pre and post-test, field notes, and observations. The students also kept a journal and performed self-assessments. Photographs were taken to record the students’ use of different measurement tools. Children’s literature about length measurement was read and discussed with the students. The data indicated that students in first and second grade have a difficult time understanding length measurement, particularly reading standard measurement tools. While the Montessori mathematics curriculum supports student understanding of length measurement, it is clear that some of the students need to have other opportunities using nonstandard tools. Overall, the Montessori mathematics curriculum supported students understanding of length measurement. The findings suggest that additional materials need to be introduced in the classroom for students to utilize, and many opportunities are available to measure with nonstandard tools to completely understand measurement and length.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2015

Doctoral Dissertation

An Exploratory Study on the Effectiveness of Montessori Constructs and Traditional Teaching Methodology as Change Agents to Increase Academic Achievement of Elementary Black Students

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Academic achievement, African American children, African American community, Americas, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Black students consistently underachieve academically in comparison to White students. To minimize the achievement gap between Black students and White students, some experts advocate the use of differentiated instruction as an alternative methodology to teach underachieving students. Differentiated instruction is predicated on teaching students based on their learning abilities and/or learning preferences. The differentiated instructional model examined in this study combined traditional teaching methodology with specific Montessori stage two and stage three constructs. This exploratory qualitative study examined the impact that Montessori constructs combined with traditional teaching methods had on academic achievement of Black students in grades four and five in an inner city school in Dallas County, Texas. The study further explored the sample’s perceptions of and preferences for the combined teaching methodology. The sample group had been exposed to the differentiated teaching model evaluated in the study. Disaggregated 2007 and 2008 TAKS results from the Texas Education Agency were obtained to compare the school’s fourth and fifth grade Black students’ achievement to their cohort groups in the district and in the state. The TAKS data comparisons found variability in performance among the groups in each of the subject areas assessed by TAKS. Qualitative data from a Likert Scale, multiple choice questions, questionnaires, written essay, and interviews were obtained from the participants to examine the students’ perceptions of and preferences for the combined teaching methodology. Data responses were analyzed and themes were developed to determine black students’ preferences for teaching, learning, and factors that contribute to learning. The findings of this study imply that future use of a differentiated instructional model that combines traditional teaching methodology and specific Montessori constructs and principles might be effective in improving Black student achievement.

Language: English

Published: Minneapolis, Minnesota, 2009

Article

Parents, Teachers Confident Students Did Well

Available from: Digital Library of the Caribbean

Publication: Barbados Advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados)

Pages: 9

Americas, Barbados, Caribbean, Latin America and the Caribbean

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Abstract/Notes: Article text: The Springer Memorial Secondary School was a hive of activity and nervous excitement as students, stationery in hand, made their way into the school to sit the Barbados Secondary School Entrance Examination (BSSEE) on Tuesday. Nervous parents were left on the outside of the school grounds standing and awaiting the return of their child or ward upon completion of the two-part 11-Plus examination, consisting of English and Mathematics. Mitchelle Maxwell, Deputy Principal of the Springer Memorial Secondary School, told the media, “We have 252 students comprising Blackman and Gollop Primary, Charles F. Broome Memorial Primary, Belmont Primary, St. Giles Primary and a few students from various schools such as St. Angela’s Primary, Happy Vale Montessori Primary School, registered to take the Barbados Secondary School Examination. “Preparations were put in place from Friday ensuring the rooms were ready, and security checks were done this morning at 6:30 a.m. prior to the exam. “We expect to have a smooth operation as it pertains to the examination this morning, which is broken up into two – Essay and Grammar, and Mathematics.” Parent, Troy Johnson, was one of the many parents and guardians on the outside of the Springer Memorial school as he waited on daughter, Zaria Johnson. He told The Barbados Advocate, “I am more nervous than my daughter. During the course of the time it was okay, but this morning the flutters have it. “She has been going to lessons and doing extra work in between, so hopefully she will do well to pass for her first choice Springer Memorial.” Calvin Williams was amongst the parents standing outside the gate. He noted, “I was not worried by the threatened actions of the Barbados Union of Teachers affecting the 11-Plus children. I was more worried of after the 11-Plus and the correction of the papers and the possibility of late results, but other than that I was not worried about the 11-Plus. “In terms of my daughter, I am very confident she will do well. Whatever she does will be good for me. She has already made me proud in NAPSAC and I am grateful for whatever she does. At present she attends the St. Giles Primary and I must commend her teacher, Mr. Stoute, for his passionate attitude in teaching the students, my daughter included. The students in his class also have great respect for him and they tend to do well during the term. I have no doubt she and the other St. Giles students will do good.” After the first part of the exam was finished, students came out smiling as they related to parents and guardians their prowess in the English section of the exam. However, it was the Mathematics paper which reduced many to tears upon leaving the exam room, running into the arms of their parents, tears streaming down their faces. Lisa Wiles, a student of Charles F. Broome Memorial, told The Barbados Advocate, “2016 paper was harder than 2015 paper. The Composition and Grammar was easy, but Section Two and Three of the Mathematics paper was hard. I am relieved the exam is over and I hope I pass for my first choice of Queen’s College.” Teacher John Gittens of Charles F. Broome Memorial noted, “I am very confident my students did well. Some of them said Section Three of the Mathematics paper was challenging, but my children were well prepared. Children at Charles F. Broome are generally well prepared. It is concerning a lot are in tears about the Mathematics paper, but generally we will do well. I do not like to see them crying because I like them to be able to conquer challenges. The fact there are tears means there are sums or one particular sum that was challenging, but I always tell them there are things you may not be comfortable with, but just apply yourself to it because that is just fear. “Now the exam is finished, some of the students will be taken to Divi Southwinds for a treat arranged by their parents where they can relax and have fun. The next day at school, we will review the exam papers with them and show them where they went wrong so they can apply it later on.”

Language: English

Article

Going Deaf: Denver Experiment Will Be Watched by Montessorians and Advocates for the Deaf [Montessori Institute in Denver]

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 8, no. 1

Pages: 1, 27

Children with disabilities, Deaf, Deaf children - Education, Inclusive education, Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Conference Paper

The Impact of the Montessori Method’s Three-Period Lesson on the Word Learning of Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Available from: higherlogicdownload AWS

Children with disabilities, Deaf, Deaf children, Hearing impaired children, Inclusive education, Montessori method of education, Three-Period Lesson

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Abstract/Notes: Poster presentation at an undetermined conference.

Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation

Examining the Transition Experience of Students from Multiage Elementary Programs to Single-Grade Classrooms at the Middle School

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: Multiage programming is a school reform option used throughout the United States. Much of the current literature focuses on the short-term benefits of multiage programs, particularly at the elementary level, with little consideration for long-term effects or for what might happen to students once they leave the multiage classroom and enter middle school. While there has been significant research that generalizes the transition experience of the general population of students, there has been limited research conducted on this transition experience for this specific population, the multiage elementary student. The purpose of this simultaneous, mixed methods study was to provide an in-depth examination of the transition effects on students who transition from multiage elementary classrooms to traditional single-grade classrooms at the middle school. In this study, eight students who had previously attended multiage elementary classrooms were given the Piers-Harris 2 Children's Self Concept Scale at three points, fall, winter, and spring during their first year in middle school to assess the students' social and emotional well-being during the transition. Students were also administered a middle school transition questionnaire to identify what procedural, academic, or social issues were of concern to them. Students were interviewed about their transitional experiences. In the analysis of the data showed that the students' overall sense of self and self-esteem improved over the course of the transitional year. Student concerns with procedures, academics, and social life decreased over the course of the year. The following major categories emerged from the interviews: (a) adjusting to the structure of middle school, (b) adjusting to new academic demands, (c) managing relationships with teachers and peers, and (d) changing sense of self. The findings have implications for middle level educators, multiage classroom elementary educators and for parents.

Language: English

Published: Chicago, Illinois, 2012

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