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99 results

Article

Effectiveness of DementiAbility Methods: The Montessori Way on Agitation in Long-term Care Home Residents with Dementia in Hong Kong

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, vol. 34, no. 9

Pages: 1352-1358

Alzheimer's disease, Asia, China, Dementia, East Asia, Gerontology, Hong Kong, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: Objective To investigate the effect of the DementiAbility Methods: The Montessori Way (DMMW) on agitation in long-term care home residents with dementia. The activities using the DMMW are hypothesized to reduce agitation in terms of its frequency and disruptiveness to greater extent than structured social activities as control. Methods Forty-six long-term care home residents with dementia were randomly allocated to receive the DMMW (n = 23) or structured social activities as control (n = 23). Each participant received six intervention sessions of 45 minutes each within 2 weeks, at long-term care home. Agitation in terms of frequency and disruptiveness before and after the intervention were compared. Results The results showed that the DMMW resulted in significant reduction in overall frequency and disruptiveness of agitation. The DMMW group had significant reduction in frequency and disruptiveness of verbal aggressive, physical nonaggressive, and physical aggressive behaviors after the intervention. Conclusions The present findings support the potential of the DMMW as a safe and efficacious therapeutic intervention for addressing agitation in long-term care home residents with dementia, relevant to Hong Kong culture.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1002/gps.5063

ISSN: 1099-1166

Article

Montessori Intervention for Individuals with Dementia: Feasibility Study of a Culturally Adapted Psychosocial Intervention in Pakistan (MIRACLE)

Available from: Cambridge University Press

Publication: BJ Psych Open, vol. 6, no. 4

Pages: e69

Alzheimer's disease, Asia, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI), Pakistan, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Globally, nearly two-thirds of people with dementia reside in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), yet research on how to support people with dementia in LMIC settings is sparse, particularly regarding the management of behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia. Understanding how best to manage these symptoms of dementia with non-specialist approaches in LMICs is critical. One such approach is a non-pharmacological intervention based on the Montessori method. To evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of a culturally adapted, group-based Montessori intervention for care home residents with dementia and their study partners, who were paid care workers in Pakistan. This was a two-stage study: a cultural adaptation of the Montessori intervention and a single-arm, open-label, feasibility and acceptability study of 12 participant dyads. Feasibility and tolerability of the intervention and study procedures were determined through the recruitment rate, adherence to the protocol and acceptance of the intervention. Qualitative interviews were undertaken with the study partners. A pre–post exploratory analysis of ratings of behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia, functional ability and quality of life were also conducted. The recruitment and retention rates of people with dementia were acceptable, and the intervention was well tolerated by participant dyads. Findings show a reduction in agitation levels and improvement in mood and interest for the activities. Feasibility studies of low-cost, easy-to-deliver and culturally adapted interventions are essential in laying the groundwork for subsequent definitive effectiveness and/or implementation trials for dementia in LMICs, where awareness and resources for dementia are limited.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1192/bjo.2020.49

ISSN: 2056-4724

Article

Research Trends and Hotspots on Montessori Intervention in Patients With Dementia From 2000 to 2021: A Bibliometric Analysis

Available from: Frontiers in Psychiatry

Publication: Frontiers in Psychiatry, vol. 12

Pages: 737270

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: Background: Patients with dementia experience a variety of neuropsychiatric symptoms and behavioral disturbances. The Montessori method is a type of non-pharmacological intervention to care for people with dementia. However, there are few bibliometric studies on the application of Montessori methods. We aimed to analyze the hotspots and trends of research on the application of Montessori methods to the care of dementia patients. Methods: Microsoft Office Excel, Co-Occurrence 9.9, and CiteSpace were used to analyze the articles on Montessori intervention in patients with dementia from 2000 to 2021 in China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang, China Science and Technology Journal Database, Web of Science core collection database, PubMed, and Scopus. Results: A total of 23 Chinese language publications and 113 English language publications were included. The number of English language publications was on the rise, while the number of Chinese language publications was low. There are many issuing institutions which published articles in this field, mostly concentrated in universities. English language publication sources were more than Chinese language publication sources. The hot research topic in Chinese language publications and English language publications was the care of agitated behavior of dementia patients based on the Montessori method. The psychological problems of dementia patients are likely to become a hot issue of concern for scholars in Chinese. There will be a lot of research focusing on dementia patients and their family caregivers in this field. Conclusion: The bibliometric and visualization analysis helps us understand the current research status and hotspots of Montessori intervention in dementia patients in Chinese language publications and English language publications.

Language: English

DOI: 10.3389/fpsyt.2021.737270

ISSN: 1664-0640

Article

Using a Montessori Method to Increase Eating Ability for Institutionalised Residents with Dementia: A Crossover Design

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: Journal of Clinical Nursing, vol. 20, no. 21-22

Pages: 3092-3101

Alzheimer's disease, Asia, Dementia, East Asia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI), Taiwan

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Abstract/Notes: Aims. To investigate the efficacy of applying a Montessori intervention to improve the eating ability and nutritional status of residents with dementia in long-term care facilities. Background. An early intervention for eating difficulties in patients with dementia can give them a better chance of maintaining independence and reduce the risk of malnutrition. Methods. An experimental crossover design was employed. Twenty-nine residents were chosen from two dementia special care units in metropolitan Taipei. To avoid contamination between participants in units using both Montessori and control interventions, two dementia special care units were randomly assigned into Montessori intervention (I1) and routine activities (I2) sequence groups. A two-period crossover design was used, with 15 residents assigned to Montessori intervention sequence I (I1, I2) and 14 residents assigned to Montessori intervention sequence II (I2, I1). On each intervention day, residents were given their assigned intervention. Montessori intervention was provided in 30-min sessions once every day, three days per week, for eight weeks. There was a two-week washout period between each intervention. Results. There was a significant reduction in the Edinburgh Feeding Evaluation in Dementia score for the Montessori intervention period but not for the routine activities period, while the mean differences for the Eating Behavior Scale score, self-feeding frequency and self-feeding time were significantly higher than those of the routine activities period. Except for the Mini-Nutritional Assessment score post-test being significantly less than the pre-test for the routine activities period, no significant differences for any other variables were found for the routine activities period. Conclusion. This study confirms the efficacy of a Montessori intervention protocol on eating ability of residents with dementia. Adopting Montessori intervention protocols to maintain residents’ self-feeding ability in clinical practice is recommended. Relevance to clinical practice. Montessori-based activities could provide caregivers with an evidence-based nursing strategy to deal with eating difficulties of people with dementia.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2011.03858.x

ISSN: 1365-2702

Book

The Montessori Method for Connecting to People with Dementia: A Creative Guide to Communication and Engagement in Dementia Care

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: Creative activities can support people with dementia, leading to moments of reconnection and joy. This book shows how the Montessori method - with its arts-based, person-centred and positive focus - can help caregivers connect to people with dementia. Drawing on 20 years of experience, Tom and Karen Brenner explain the philosophy of the Montessori method, provide clearly-written steps to follow when applying it, and share a wealth of case studies and stories from their personal work using this method with people with dementia. This includes reading circles, art programmes, drum circles, poetry, and video diaries. Supported by research of the importance of creativity and the arts in dementia care, it is made clear throughout how every aspect of the Montessori method can help those with dementia to rediscover the world around them, maximising the opportunities they have to reconnect with their peers, family, friends, and support staff.

Language: English

Published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-78592-813-0 978-1-78450-873-9 1-78450-873-X

Article

Montessori-Based Activities Among Persons with Late-Stage Dementia: Evaluation of Mental and Behavioral Health Outcomes:

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: Dementia, vol. 18, no. 4

Pages: 1373-1392

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: Literature regarding Montessori-based activities with older adults with dementia is fairly common with early stages of dementia. Conversely, research on said activities with individuals experiencing late-stage dementia is limited because of logistical difficulties in sampling and data collection. Given the need to understand risks and benefits of treatments for individuals with late-stage dementia, specifically regarding their mental and behavioral health, this study sought to evaluate the effects of a Montessori-based activity program implemented in a long-term care facility. Utilizing an interrupted time series design, trained staff completed observation-based measures for 43 residents with late-stage dementia at three intervals over six months. Empirical measures assessed mental health (anxiety, psychological well-being, quality of life) and behavioral health (problem behaviors, social engagement, capacity for activities of daily living). Group differences were observed via repeated measures ANOVA and paired-samples t-tests. The aggregate, longitudinal results—from baseline to final data interval—for the psychological and behavioral health measures were as follows: problem behaviors diminished though not significantly; social engagement decreased significantly; capacities for activities of daily living decreased significantly; quality of life increased slightly but not significantly; anxiety decreased slightly but not significantly; and psychological well-being significantly decreased. Improvements observed for quality of life and problem behaviors may yield promise for Montessori-based activities and related health care practices. The rapid physiological and cognitive deterioration from late-stage dementia should be considered when interpreting these results.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/1471301217703242

ISSN: 1741-2684, 1471-3012

Article

‘The Jigsaw Culture of Care’: A Qualitative Analysis of Montessori-Based Programming for Dementia Care in the United Kingdom

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: Dementia, vol. 20, no. 8

Pages: 2876-2890

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, England, Europe, Gerontology, Great Britain, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI), Northern Europe, Northern Ireland, Scotland

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori-Based Programming (MBP) in dementia care refers to a growing body of research and practice that has developed Montessori methods to facilitate self-paced learning, independence and engagement for people living with dementia. A number of research gaps have been identified in the existing literature such as a lack of cross-cultural studies and well-powered, robustly designed outcome studies. The current study investigated the use of MBP with a focus on provision in the United Kingdom. It aimed to identify MBP implementation approaches, challenges and barriers, and research gaps.Design and MethodsA qualitative design was implemented to analyse data from in-depth, semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders (N = 8) with experience of MBP in the UK. Participants included care home management and staff, MBP trainers and independent dementia experts with a background in Montessori methods. Thematic analysis identified 4 main themes and 12 sub-themes. The study took place between April 2019 and October 2019.FindingsA framework describing knowledge and understanding of MBP in the UK, implementation considerations, challenges and barriers, evidence of outcomes and research gaps was developed to provide guidance for researchers and practitioners. Implementation considerations included using a whole-home approach and changing the culture of care through management support. Barriers to implementation included conservative attitudes to care, perceived lack of time and resources, health and safety issues, and issues of sustainability.ConclusionThe benefits of MBP in dementia care are promising but require further empirical investigation. There is a need to design, execute and publish evidence to secure the support of key stakeholders in dementia care research, policy and commissioning in the UK.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/14713012211020143

ISSN: 1741-2684, 1471-3012

Article

Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP): Training Persons With Dementia to Serve as Group Activity Leaders

Available from: Oxford University Press

Publication: The Gerontologist, vol. 44, no. 3

Pages: 426-431

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an activity implemented by means of Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP). Design and Methods: Four persons with early-stage dementia were trained to serve as leaders for a small-group activity played by nine persons with more advanced dementia. Assessments of leaders' ability to learn the procedures of leading a group, as well as their satisfaction with this role, were taken, as were measures of players' engagement and affect during standard activities programming and RAMP activities. Results: Leaders demonstrated the potential to fill the role of group activity leader effectively, and they expressed a high level of satisfaction with this role. Players' levels of positive engagement and pleasure during the RAMP activity were higher than during standard group activities. Implications: This study suggests that to the extent that procedural learning is available to persons with early-stage dementia, especially when they are assisted with external cueing, these individuals can successfully fill the role of volunteers when working with persons with more advanced dementia. This can provide a meaningful social role for leaders and increase access to high quality activities programming for large numbers of persons with dementia.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1093/geront/44.3.426

ISSN: 0016-9013

Article

Caring for People with Dementia in Residential Aged Care: Successes with a Composite Person-Centered Care Model Featuring Montessori-based Activities

Available from: ScienceDirect

Publication: Geriatric Nursing, vol. 36, no. 2

Pages: 106-110

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: Person-centered models of dementia care commonly merge aspects of existing models with additional influences from published and unpublished evidence and existing government policy. This study reports on the development and evaluation of one such composite model of person-centered dementia care, the ABLE model. The model was based on building the capacity and ability of residents living with dementia, using environmental changes, staff education and organizational and community engagement. Montessori principles were also used. The evaluation of the model employed mixed methods. Significant behavior changes were evident among residents of the dementia care Unit after the model was introduced, as were reductions in anti-psychotic and sedative medication. Staff reported increased knowledge about meeting the needs of people with dementia, and experienced organizational culture change that supported the ABLE model of care. Families were very satisfied with the changes.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1016/j.gerinurse.2014.11.003

ISSN: 0197-4572

Article

Using Spaced Retrieval and Montessori-based Activities in Improving Eating Ability for Residents with Dementia

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, vol. 25, no. 10

Pages: 953-959

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: Objectives To construct a training protocol for spaced retrieval (SR) and to investigate the effectiveness of SR and Montessori-based activities in decreasing eating difficulty in older residents with dementia. Methods A single evaluator, blind, and randomized control trial was used. Eighty-five residents with dementia were chosen from three special care units for residents with dementia in long-term care facilities in Taiwan. To avoid any confounding of subjects, the three institutions were randomized into three groups: spaced retrieval, Montessori-based activities, and a control group. The invention consisted of three 30–40 min sessions per week, for 8 weeks. Results After receiving the intervention, the Edinburgh Feeding Evaluation in Dementia (EdFED) scores and assisted feeding scores for the SR and Montessori-based activity groups were significantly lower than that of the control group. However, the frequencies of physical assistance and verbal assistance for the Montessori-based activity group after intervention were significantly higher than that of the control group, which suggests that residents who received Montessori-based activity need more physical and verbal assistance during mealtimes. In terms of the effects of nutritional status after intervention, Mini-Nutritional Assessment (MNA) in the SR group was significantly higher than that of the control group. Conclusion This study confirms the efficacy of SR and Montessori-based activities for eating difficulty and eating ability. A longitudinal study to follow the long-term effects of SR and Montessori-based activities on eating ability and nutritional status is recommended. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1002/gps.2433

ISSN: 1099-1166

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