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262 results

Article

Racial Discipline Disproportionality in Montessori and Traditional Public Schools: A Comparative Study Using the Relative Rate Index

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 1, no. 1

Pages: 14-27

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Comparative education, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Public Montessori, School discipline, Teacher-student relationships, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Research from the past 40 years indicates that African American students are subjected to exclusionary discipline, including suspension and expulsion, at rates two to three times higher than their White peers (Children’s Defense Fund, 1975; Skiba, Michael, Nardo, & Peterson, 2002). Although this phenomenon has been studied extensively in traditional public schools, rates of racially disproportionate discipline in public Montessori schools have not been examined. The purpose of this study is to examine racial discipline disproportionality in Montessori public elementary schools as compared to traditional elementary schools. The Relative Rate Index (RRI) is used as a measure of racially disproportionate use of out-of-school suspensions (Tobin & Vincent, 2011). Suspension data from the Office of Civil Rights Data Collection was used to generate RRIs for Montessori and traditional elementary schools in a large urban district in the Southeast. While statistically significant levels of racial discipline disproportionality are found in both the Montessori and traditional schools, the effect is substantially less pronounced in Montessori settings. These findings suggest that Montessori schools are not immune to racially disproportionate discipline and should work to incorporate more culturally responsive classroom management techniques. Conversely, the lower levels of racially disproportionate discipline in the Montessori schools suggests that further study of discipline in Montessori environments may provide lessons for traditional schools to promote equitable discipline.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v1i1.4941

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

La Discipline [Discipline]

Publication: Pédagogie (Centre d'études Pédagogiques) [Pedagogy (Center for Pedagogical Studies)], no. 5

Pages: 257-267

Discipline, Maria Montessori - Writings

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Language: French

ISSN: 0151-0258

Article

Model Pembelajaran Montessori dalam Membangun Kedisiplinan Anak di TK Awliya Kota Cirebon [Montessori Learning Model in Building Child Discipline in Kindergarten Awliya Cirebon City]

Available from: Kiddo: Jurnal Pendidikan Islam Anak Usia Dini

Publication: Kiddo: Jurnal Pendidikan Islam Anak Usia Dini [Kiddo: Journal of Early Childhood Islamic Education], vol. 1, no. 2

Pages: 108-120

Asia, Australasia, Indonesia, Montessori method of education, Southeast Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Discipline is very important to be developed early on, while the definition of discipline itself is giving an understanding to which children should be obeyed and which should be avoided. Discipline also teaches children about making mistakes will certainly contain a number of consequences, for this reason the function of punishment in children's education. Discipline is a behavioral value that can be done by force and can be done voluntarily. This Montessori-based learning model can build discipline starting from getting children to tidy up their former food, washing dishes, being able to take responsibility for the assignments given by their teacher, which has been applied in kindergarten Awliya, Cirebon. This research uses descriptive qualitative method that seeks to provide background, unique characteristics. The data obtained through interviews, observation and documentation. The results showed that children in the Awliya Kindergarten in Cirebon City could build their discipline through a Montessori-based learning model. This habit is a rare beginning in building discipline in early childhood.

Language: Indonesian

ISSN: 2716-1641, 2716-0572

Presentation

Liberty, Discipline and Pedagogy: Mapping Pathways Towards Social and Cultural Independence Through the Regulation of Activity and Attention in a Montessori Classroom

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Abstract/Notes: The term discipline weaves together, through its etymology and use, both learning and regulation, suggesting that one cannot be achieved without the other. It is in this sense, that Dr Maria Montessori applied the term as she designed her distinctive pedagogy during the first half of the twentieth century. Her aim was for children to regulate their activity and their attention through interaction with meticulously designed objects combined with precise language, including the language of educational disciplines. What distinguishes Montessori pedagogy is that children’s liberty is identified as both the means and the end of this regulation. Liberty and discipline were considered by Dr Montessori (1998 [1939], p. 41) to be ‘two faces of the same coin, two faces of the same action’. Montessori’s emphasis on liberty locates her pedagogy in the Enlightenment tradition, but her simultaneous emphasis on discipline, in both senses, reveals an orientation out of step with the tradition of Rousseau, the tradition which remains in the foreground whenever pedagogy is linked with the legacy of the Enlightenment. This paper presents Montessori’s pedagogy of liberty and discipline as one realisation of another, less visible, Enlightenment tradition. This tradition comes into clearer view when human development is perceived as socially, and therefore, semiotically, mediated (Vygotsky 1986 [1934]) and pedagogy is perceived as discipline knowledge embedded in a regulating social order (Bernstein 2000).

Language: English

Presented: University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia: Disciplinarity, Knowledge and Language (Symposium), Dec 2008

Article

La discipline et la liberté [Discipline and freedom]

Available from: Université Caen Normandie

Publication: Pour l'ère nouvelle: revue internationale d'èducation nouvelle, vol. 6, no. 29

Pages: 111-113

Maria Montessori - Writings

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Language: French

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of the Implementation of the Conscious Discipline Program on Social Emotional Learning in an Early Childhood Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This study investigates the efficacy of Conscious Discipline’s teaching strategies to enrich social-emotional learning and establish a positive classroom climate in an early childhood Montessori classroom. Conscious Discipline is a written program, of instructional and behavioral strategies created by Dr. Becky Bailey (2011). The question throughout this research project was “Does teaching Conscious Discipline strategies enhance social-emotional learning in preschool aged children?” The study was conducted in a Montessori classroom, the participants being both boys and girls ranging in age from 3 to 4 years. For six weeks, Conscious Discipline strategies were being implemented on a day-to-day basis, when dealing with real-life incidents in the classroom, reading books purchased through Conscious Discipline and establishing a Safe Place. During this sixweek study data was gathered through observations, a pre-survey, and a standardized assessment, and analyzed to document the effects of Conscious Discipline. The data collected demonstrated an increase in social-emotional learning, an increase in the joy in teaching, a positive classroom climate, a decrease in aggressive acts, and an increase in student respect and responsibility in a social community.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2014

Article

"To Be Strict on Your Own”: Black and Latinx Parents Evaluate Discipline in Urban Choice Schools

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: American Educational Research Journal, vol. 56, no. 5

Pages: 1896-1929

African American community, African Americans, Latin American community, Public Montessori, Montessori schools, Public Montessori, School choice

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Abstract/Notes: The proliferation of urban “no-excuses” charter schools has been justified by arguing that Black and Latinx parents want strict discipline. In this article, we examine what discipline means to Black and Latinx families at two popular choice options: a no-excuses charter and two public Montessori magnets. We found that parents viewed discipline as more than rule-following, valuing also self-discipline and academic discipline. While no-excuses parents supported an orderly environment, many found the discipline restrictive. Parents in the Montessori schools, by contrast, praised student autonomy but questioned whether the freedom was preparing their students academically. Our findings reveal a gap between what Black and Latinx parents want and what choice schools and local school choice markets have on offer.

Language: English

DOI: 10.3102/0002831219831972

ISSN: 0002-8312, 1935-1011

Article

The Montessori Approach to Discipline: Developing Inner Discipline through Freedom and Structure

Publication: Tomorrow's Child, vol. 4, no. 1

Pages: 20–22

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Book Section

The Teaching Methods Employed in Children's Houses: Physical Growth; The Environment; Practical Observations; Discipline and Liberty; The Difficulty of Discipline in Schools; Independence; The More Useless Help Is, the More It Is a Hindrance to the Development of Natural Powers; Reward and Punishments for Our Children; Freedom to Develop

Book Title: The Discovery of the Child

Pages: 41-64

Maria Montessori - Writings

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Abstract/Notes: Formerly entitled The Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in the Children's Houses. This book was first published in 1909 under the title 'Il Metodo della Pedagogia Scientifica Applicato all'Educazione Infantile nelle Case dei Bambini' ('The Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in the Children's Houses) and was revised in 1913, 1926, and 1935. Maria Montessori revised and reissued this book in 1948 and renamed it 'La Scoperta del Bambino'. This edition is based on the 6th Italian edition of 'La Scoperta del Bambino' published by the Italian publisher Garzanti, Milan, Italy in 1962. M. J. Costelloe, S. J. translated this Italian version into the English language in 1967 for Fides Publishers, Inc. In 2016 Fred Kelpin edited this version and added many footnotes. He incorporated new illustrations based on AMI-blueprints of the materials currently in use.

Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company, 2017

ISBN: 978-90-79506-38-5

Series: The Montessori Series , 2

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Implementation of Self-Regulation and Conflict Resolution Strategies through Conscious Discipline in an Early Childhood Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to determine if implementing Conscious Discipline® methods would improve self-regulation and conflict resolution strategies. The action research took place over six weeks in a Montessori classroom with 30 students ranging from 3-6 years old; however, the participants were eight specific four or five year old male students. Four data collection tools were used throughout the intervention; a pre and post intervention survey, a weekly behavioral observation, a student reflection, and an end-of-day self-reflection form. After analyzing the data, evidence showed improved behaviors. By implementing Conscious Discipline®, students were able to improve their self-regulation and peer interaction skills. Potential future action research investigation relating to this study may include what effects Conscious Discipline® would have on females or how Conscious Discipline® helps older participants with more mature social issues such as bullying, fighting, labeling, and peer pressure.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2016

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