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123 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Effects of Three Different Educational Approaches on Children's Drawing Ability: Steiner, Montessori, and Traditional

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: British Journal of Educational Psychology, vol. 70, no. 4

Pages: 485-503

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Abstract/Notes: Although there is a national curriculum for art education in the UK there are also alternative approaches in the private sector. This paper addresses the issue of the effect of these approaches on children's drawing ability. Aim. To compare the drawing ability in three drawing tasks of children in Steiner, Montessori and traditional schools. Sample. The participants were 60 school children between the ages of 5;11 and 7;2. Twenty children were tested in each type of school. Method. Each child completed three drawings: a free drawing, a scene and an observational drawing. Results. As predicted, the free and scene drawings of children in the Steiner school were rated more highly than those of children in Montessori and traditional schools. Steiner children's use of colour was also rated more highly, although they did not use more colours than the other children. Steiner children used significantly more fantasy topics in their free drawings. Further observation indicated that the Steiner children were better at using the whole page and organising their drawings into a scene; their drawings were also more detailed. Contrary to previous research Montessori children did not draw more inanimate objects and geometrical shapes or fewer people than other children. Also, contrary to the prediction, Steiner children were significantly better rather than worse than other children at observational drawing. Conclusion. The results suggest that the approach to art education in Steiner schools is conducive not only to more highly rated imaginative drawings in terms of general drawing ability and use of colour but also to more accurate and detailed observational drawings.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1348/000709900158263

ISSN: 2044-8279, 0007-0998

Article

The Effects of the Montessori Sensory Education on Sensory Ability Development of the Children with Disability / 몬테소리 감각 교육이 장애아의 지각 향상에 미치는 영향

Publication: 韓國肢體不自由兒敎育學會誌 重複·肢體不自由兒敎育 / Korean Journal of Physical and Multiple Disabilities, vol. 40

Pages: 213-231

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Language: Korean

ISSN: 1226-8836

Article

Question and Answer Re Spontaneous Drawing (A Broad and Adapted Translation from the French Original)

Publication: Communications (Association Montessori Internationale, 195?-2008), vol. 1999, no. 2-3

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Language: English

ISSN: 0519-0959

Article

[pen and ink drawing of Dr. Maria Montessori]

Available from: HathiTrust

Publication: Bookman (New York), vol. 39

Pages: 497

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Language: English

ISSN: 2156-9932

Article

Montessori on Drawing

Publication: Good Work (Catholic Art Association, Buffalo)

Pages: 127

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Language: English

Article

Étude des Formes et Dessin Libre [Study of Shapes and Free Drawing]

Publication: Pédagogie (Centre d'études Pédagogiques) [Pedagogy (Center for Pedagogical Studies)]

Pages: 587-592

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Language: French

ISSN: 0151-0258

Article

Lo que dice Maria Montessori sobre la enseñanza del Dibujo [What Maria Montessori says about teaching Drawing] [part 1]

Available from: Hemeroteca Informador

Publication: El Informador (Guadalajara, Mexico)

Pages: 4

Americas, Central America, Latin America and the Caribbean, Mexico

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Language: Spanish

Article

Lo que dice Maria Montessori sobre la enseñanza del Dibujo [What Maria Montessori says about teaching Drawing] [part 2]

Available from: Hemeroteca Informador

Publication: El Informador (Guadalajara, Mexico)

Pages: 2

Americas, Central America, Latin America and the Caribbean, Mexico

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Language: Spanish

Book Section

Free-Hand Drawing: Studies from Life

Book Title: The Advanced Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to the Education of Children from Seven to Eleven Years: The Montessori Elementary Material

Pages: 293-298

Maria Montessori - Writings

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Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori Pierson Publishing Company, 2017

ISBN: 978-90-79506-28-6

Series: The Montessori Series , 13

Volume: 2 of 2

Book

Play and Creative Drawing in Preschool: A Comparative Study of Montessori and Public Preschools in Kenya

Africa, Comparative education, East Africa, Kenya, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Abstract/Notes: When children enter preschool or kindergarten, they often seem to bring a spirit of wonder, great curiosity, and a spontaneous drive to explore, experiment and manipulate playfully and originally. Learning environments have been perceived to have the dual role of promoting as well as killing creativity. This has been attributed to the fact that as a child progresses through school years, teaching and learning become more dominant as play and self-exploration are stifled. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between play and creative drawing in Kenyan preschool children. A comparative study of the Montessori and the traditional public school system was carried out 48 preschool children between the ages of 4 and 6. Half were enrolled in Montessori while the other half in public schools Kenya. Through a qualitative design by the use of the Test of Creative Thinking Drawing Production (TCT-DP) (Urban & Jellen, 1996), and Rubin’s (2001) Play Observation Scale analyses were carried out. Independent sample t tests, Pearson product moment correlations and stepwise hierarchical multiple regressions were computed to determine whether interactions and differences in social play, cognitive play and creative drawing performance were apparent between Montessori and traditional public preschools. Statistically significant results were obtained indicating that Montessori children engaged in cognitive play more than public preschool children and had higher scores on creativity than public preschool children. In addition, age differences in social play as well as in creativity scores were found. However, no gender differences were apparent in social play, cognitive play or in creativity scores.

Language: English

Published: Munich, Germany: Herbert Utz Verlag, 2013

ISBN: 978-3-8316-4284-7

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