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Bachelors Thesis

They're Enthusiastic About the Alphabet: Dyslexia and the Montessori Pedagogical Method

Available from: Università Ca' Foscari Venezia Online

Children with disabilities, Dyslexia, Dyslexic children, Inclusive education, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: Reading disorder, most commonly known as dyslexia, is a learning disability that seems to affect an increasing number of children. Numerous researches have been done on the subject over the last hundred years, all of them producing different and sometimes contradictory theories about its causes and possible therapies. In this thesis a general overview of such researches, of various etiological hypothesis and of the most commonly accepted treatments and therapies is presented. The Montessori pedagogical method is then introduced describing its main guidelines and presenting Maria Montessori’s reading and writing teaching approach supported by her own experiences. The aim of the thesis is to show how this highly enlightening pedagogical method can provide both a valid alternative to the standard procedure of reading and writing teaching and a valid dyslexia treatment method. This latter supposition is based on the fact that Montessori’s approach is a multisensory one, just like some of the most successful dyslexia therapies and treatments. Further empirical research on the matter is required.

Language: English

Published: Venice, Italy, 2012

Article

Honoring the Child with Dyslexia in a Montessori Classroom

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 21, no. 1

Pages: 36-40

Children with disabilities, Dyslexia, Dyslexic children, Inclusive education, Montessori method of education, People with disabilities, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Speaking, listening, reading, and writing are all language activities. The human capacity for speaking and listening has a biological foundation: wherever there are people, there is spoken language. Acquiring spoken language is an unconscious activity, and, barring any physical deformity or language learning disability, like severe autism, all children listen and speak. In contrast, writing systems must be consciously learned. A child beginning to read and write has to discover what sound each symbol in the written code stands for and, in English, understand that the sound may change depending upon the placement within a word (i.e. circus or success). However, for 8 percent of the population, this process is remarkably difficult. Variable and often hereditary, this difficulty in acquiring and processing written language is called dyslexia, and it is manifested by a lack of proficiency in one or more of the processes of reading, spelling, or writing. Because dyslexia is a language-based disorder, it can be predicted from language development during the pre-reading stage. Classroom teachers of many pre-reading children can be at the forefront of identifying and helping the child with dyslexia before the disability diminishes that motivation, confidence, and love of learning that denote a Montessori child. Good teachers often just "know" that a child is developing atypically, but rarely is that enough to get the child the help she needs. Some simple screening procedures can provide data to show parents and other professionals and can lend confidence to a hunch. This article offers several screening activities for the classroom teacher.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Report

Montessori as an Intervention for Children with Dyslexia

Available from: National Center for Montessori in the Public Sector (NCMPS)

Children with disabilities, Dyslexia, Dyslexic children, Inclusive education, Learning disabilities, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: Many aspects of Montessori reading instruction inherently help meet the needs of children with dyslexia. Various Montessori materials can be used to help students with dyslexia master phonics, syntax, and other aspects of written language. Montessori environments are language-rich and replete with opportunities for practice with decoding, increasing fluency, and improving reading comprehension.

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., 2016

Article

Just the Facts: Information Provided by the International Dyslexia Association

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 34, no. 2

Pages: 203–232

Children with disabilities, Dyslexia, Dyslexic children

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Abstract/Notes: Fact sheet

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Dyslexia

Publication: Montessori Quarterly, vol. 24

Pages: 1–5

Dyslexia, Dyslexic children, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

Article

Dyslexia and ADD: 20 Questions Parents Ask

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 14, no. 4

Pages: 7–8

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, Attention-deficit-disordered children, Children with disabilities, Dyslexia, Dyslexic children, Inclusive education, People with disabilities, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Dyslexia Awareness

Publication: Montessori International, vol. 9, no. 5

Pages: 23, 28

Children with disabilities, Dyslexia, Dyslexic children, Inclusive education, People with disabilities, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

Article

Identifying Dyslexia

Publication: Montessori Today (London), vol. 2, no. 1

Pages: 23

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 0952-8652

Article

Diploma Holders' Meetings [Nonverbal communication, dyslexia]

Publication: Montessori Quarterly, vol. 11, no. Supplement

Pages: 17–19

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

Article

Special Needs: Dyslexia

Publication: Montessori Courier, vol. 1, no. 5

Pages: 20–21, 30

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 0959-4108

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