Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

74 results

Doctoral Dissertation

Mind Over Matter: Contributing Factors to Self-Efficacy in Montessori Teachers

Available from: CU University Libraries

See More

Abstract/Notes: Interpreting Albert Bandura's term "self-efficacy" as the individual's belief in his own abilities to succeed in spite of the given circumstances, this study seeks to identify the influences which lead to self-efficacy in Montessori teachers. In order to evaluate perceptions of self-efficacy, 35 pre-service teachers in the United States were surveyed prior to beginning their Montessori teaching and again during the internship stage of their training. As Bandura asserted that self-efficacy stems from four possible sources: mastery experience; vicarious experience; verbal or social persuasion; and physiological state (1997), the same subjects were given an additional questionnaire to determine which factors most affected their efficacy. Multiple regression was then used to examine the relationship between those factors and the teachers' self-reported efficacy. Following this data collection, four teachers from the high self-efficacy group and four teachers from the low self-efficacy group were interviewed to reveal detailed qualitative information regarding the influences on their classroom efficacy. The research indicates that Montessori teachers with high levels of self-efficacy have strong mastery experiences that support their attitudes and desired professional goals. The quantitative results also show that an emotional state associated with past experiences is the second best contributor to self-efficacy. Considering that self-efficacy may be most malleable during the early stages of learning, the results of this study serve to enhance the teacher-training experience though the analysis of early obstacles.

Language: English

Published: Boulder, Colorado, 2012

Doctoral Dissertation

A Comparison of Traditional vs. Montessori Education in Relation to Children's Self-Esteem, Self-Efficacy, and Prosocial Behavior

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Academic achievement, Americas, Caribbean, Comparative education, Elementary education, Latin America and the Caribbean, Montessori schools, Puerto Rico, Student attitudes

See More

Abstract/Notes: The present study compares elementary school children from Traditional and Montessori programs. The purpose is to investigate how different educational philosophies and teaching methods affect perceived levels of self-esteem, self-efficacy, prosocial behavior and aggressive behavior in children. The participants in this study consisted of second through sixth grade students who were attending Montessori and Traditional schools since the age of five, or earlier. All children completed the Washington Self-Description Questionnaire (WSDQ), three subscales of the Children's Multi-dimensional Self-Efficacy Scales (i.e., academic achievement, self-regulated learning, & social), the Physical and Verbal Aggression Scale, and the Prosocial Behavior Scale. No significant differences were revealed between the Montessori and Traditional programs in relation to the children's perceived levels of self-esteem, self-efficacy for academic achievement, self-efficacy for self-regulated learning, social self-efficacy, or prosocial behavior. However, the Montessori children reported significantly lower levels of physical/verbal aggression than the Traditional children. Moreover, as Montessori children develop a heightened ability to work within a group of peers, they seem to develop lower levels of physical/verbal aggression, which was not found among Traditional children. Furthermore, Montessori children's perceived ability to make and keep friends of the same gender was found to significantly improve with increased years in the program, which was not found in the Traditional method. For Montessori children, their perceived ability to work together in a group was found to be positively associated with heightened levels of self-efficacy for academic achievement and self-efficacy for self-regulated learning. Furthermore, the Montessori children's levels of self-esteem were correlated significantly with their perceived levels of self-efficacy for academic achievement and self-efficacy for self-regulated learning. Although Traditional children were also found to gain self-efficacy for self-regulated learning through working together at young ages, as they proceed to higher grade levels, their self-efficacy for self-regulated learning decreased.

Language: English

Published: San Juan, Puerto Rico, 2002

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Building Self-Efficacy as a First Year Primary Montessori Teacher

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

See More

Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this paper is to increase the self-efficacy of a first-year teacher, with a focus on increasing the subject’s comfort with the autonomy required of the position. The subject teaches in a Montessori classroom of preschool-aged children (designed for 3-6 year olds, serving 3 year olds) at a young school in an urban environment. This was done through interventions that focused on factors of vicarious experience and social persuasion, as informed by Albert Bandura’s research. Data was collected through surveys that measured self-efficacy, satisfaction with life and job satisfaction, and through daily physical, mental, and emotional scales. Written reflection was evaluated through charting positive, neutral, and negative language. Interventions resulted in a significant increase in self-efficacy, with the influence of social persuasion having the largest impact on all factors. Future research might consider collective efficacy’s connection to social persuasion, and how a novice teacher’s sensitivity to social persuasion and vicarious experience may shift towards other factors that influence efficacy, with greater work experience.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2019

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Examining Teacher Leader Self-Efficacy and the Impact of Time Management Skills

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

See More

Abstract/Notes: This study sought to examine how time management skills would impact the self-efficacy of Teacher Leaders working in a teacher-led school model. The participants of the four-week study were three Teacher Leaders from two teacher-led primary Montessori schools in an urban area. The Teacher Leaders incorporated time management skills including time analysis, establishing goals, prioritization, and planning/scheduling.Data was collected on Teacher Leader productivity, distribution of time among teaching and administrative roles, self-efficacy, and time management behavior through pre- and post- questionnaires, daily to-do lists, and daily activity logs. The study concluded that although the results were not statistically significant, two out of three Teacher Leader’s productivity, time management behavior, and self-efficacy did improve over the course of the study. Further research is needed to determine how these time management skills impact Teacher Leader’s experienced stress, perceived productivity, and to further investigate how Teacher Leaders’ distribution of time among teaching and administrative roles impacts stress and self-efficacy. (Note: The St. Catherine University website has the incorrect title associated with this thesis. The correct title is displayed in the PDF of the thesis.)

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2021

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Montessori Junior High School Students’ Perceptions on Their Self-Efficacy in Reading

Available from: Universitas Islam Negeri Sunan Ampel Surabaya Digital Library

Publication: IJET (Indonesian Journal of English Teaching), vol. 8, no. 2

Pages: 26-37

Asia, Australasia, Indonesia, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Perceptions, Southeast Asia

See More

Abstract/Notes: Montessori approach deals with learning in independence and liberty. This way of learning requires students to explore information based on their learning interest. Therefore, reading has become one of the keys in learning successfully in a Montessori school. Moreover, the impact of self-efficacy on the learning outcomes has been explored in the educational psychology as a field of study. This study inspects students’ self-efficacy perceptions and their factors in reading comprehension in a Montessori Junior High School registered in 2018-2019 academic year. It is located in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. English is the main language used in the teaching-learning process in the school. The study is conducted by using mixed method. Findings are based on the 27 close-ended questions and three open-ended questions obtained from the students in grade seven and eight. In analyzing the results, concurrent triangulation strategy is applied. The results show that the students have positive self-efficacy perceptions on their reading (Average= 3.449/5), especially in reading, explaining, summarizing texts and comprehending the graphics found in the text without the guidance of their teachers. Their self-efficacy sources are found in their mastery experiences, vicarious experiences, verbal persuasion, and emotional and psychological states.

Language: English

DOI: 10.15642/ijet2.2019.8.2.26-37

ISSN: 2548-6497

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Community and Collaboration: The Effects of Participation in an Online Leadership Cohort on the Self-Efficacy of School Leaders

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

See More

Abstract/Notes: This action research project was conducted to see if participation in an online leadership cohort would affect the self-efficacy of school leaders. Using an online platform, seven Montessori heads of schools from the United States gathered to discuss topics of greatest importance to them. The schools represented were public, private, non-profit, proprietary and charter. The heads of schools ranged in experience from 3 to 33 years. They met once a week, for four weeks, for an hour each session to discuss four topics most relevant to the group, as determined by their suggestions. Data was collected using pre and post intervention self-assessments and surveys, as well as field notes, observation records, and tally sheets taken during the four leadership cohort sessions. The researcher facilitated the group and guided the conversations with prompts and continued questions. The heads of school asked questions of each other, offered answers, and shared resources. The intervention was shown to increase the self-efficacy of some participants, decrease the self-efficacy of some participants, and not affect the self-efficacy of others. However, the participants all reported feelings of gratitude for the opportunity to come together, citing community and collaboration as the most positive rewards.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2020

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Effects of Mindfulness on Teacher Stress and Self-Efficacy

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

See More

Abstract/Notes: Teachers experience high levels of stress due to the demands of their profession. The purpose of this study is to determine if mindfulness and meditation have an effect on stress levels and self-efficacy. The researcher-participants were two female teachers in public schools. Five days a week for four weeks, the participants practiced mindfulness activities from a curated list including Body Scan, Meditation, Breathing, Yoga, and Journaling.. The participants detailed their stress levels before and after the intervention each day and weekly through different means of data collection. The study used pre- and post-intervention questionnaires, daily journals, and weekly questionnaires to track stress levels. The intervention findings show an overall decrease in stress, one participant’s self-efficacy improved, and the other participant’s self-efficacy decreased. Future research should consider a more varied participant base, a longer period of intervention, a control and experimental group, and other forms of data collection.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2020

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Record-Keeping on Teacher Self-Efficacy and Student Self-Regulation in the Primary Montessori Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

See More

Abstract/Notes: This paper examines the effects of teacher use of an online record-keeping system on teacher self-efficacy and student self-regulation behavior. Four teachers and thirty-four students between the ages of three and six years old participated in this seven-week study in one of the few Montessori schools in a Latin American capital city. Pre- and post-study data collection methods included a teacher self-efficacy questionnaire and small group discussion, as well as use of the Head-to-Toe Test, a means of measuring children’s self-regulation behavior. For seven weeks, teachers used the program Transparent Classroom to record lessons, inform their lesson presentations, and track overall student progress. Through weekly classroom observations, child behaviors hindering and encouraging normalization were tracked with a tally sheet. Data showed increases in both teacher self-efficacy and student self-regulation, especially in children with the lowest pre-study scores, who saw dramatic gains. These results show the use of a record-keeping system may be a means of increasing achievement and satisfaction in both students and teachers.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2018

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Self-Efficacy Perceptions of Teachers on Using the Montessori Method in Special Education in North Cyprus

Available from: World Center of Innovation Research and Publication

Publication: Cypriot Journal of Educational Sciences, vol. 14, no. 4

Pages: 652-660

Asia, Cyprus, Efficacy, Middle East, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Perceptions, Special education, Western Asia

See More

Abstract/Notes: The aim of this study is to determine the self-efficacy perceptions of special education teachers about the use of the Montessori method by a valid and reliable scale developed by the researcher. The model of the research is a general descriptive model of quantitative research methods. In the 2017–2018 academic year, 67 special education teachers who work under the Directorate of Primary Education of the Ministry of National Education of the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus are participated in this research universe, which comprise 29, 12, 20, 4 and 2 teachers from Special Education Application Centre, Special Education and Work Application Centre, primary schools, kindergartens and school for visually impaired, respectively. This study was conducted only with all the special education teachers in the universe not by any sampling method. The general proficiency perceptions of the special education teachers for the use of the Montessori method were at the level of instability. According to the general competency perceptions of the female teachers on the use of the Montessori method, it was found that their responses were more positive than the males.

Language: English

DOI: 10.18844/cjes.v11i4.4480

ISSN: 1305-905X

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Impact of a Social Justice-Oriented Mindfulness Practice on the Self-Efficacy of an Early Childhood Montessori Teacher

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

See More

Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this action research was to explore how a social justice-oriented mindfulness practice would impact the self-efficacy of an early childhood educator. This self-study, with the researcher as the sole participant, took place over a six-week period while the researcher was working in a private Montessori school in the Northeastern United States in a classroom of 20 students aged 3-5. The intervention included breathwork; both walking and seated meditation paired with articles, essays, interviews, and poetry relevant to social justice; meditation; and mindfulness. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected through reflective journaling, a record of feelings scale, an attitude scale, and a pre- and post-intervention survey. While the data did not reflect any substantial impact with regards to teacher self-efficacy, the study was transformative in many ways. The intervention resulted in a deeper understanding of social inequities and a heightened sense of self-reflection. A more focused and comprehensive selection of content relevant to equity in the educational setting would likely have allowed for a more guided learning experience. Additionally, community organized events and workshops relevant to this work could play a crucial role in encouraging the need and responsibility to take action in establishing more equitable schools.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2020

Advanced Search