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Article

Emma Plank (-Spira): ihr Leben und Wirken für die Montessori-Pädagogik

Publication: Das Kind, no. 22

Pages: 63-71

Emma N. Plank - Biographic sources

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Language: German

ISSN: 0949-2682

Doctoral Dissertation

American Writings on Maria Montessori: An Inquiry into Changes in the Reception and Interpretations Given to Writings on Maria Montessori and Montessori Educational Ideas 1910-1915 and 1958-1970

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this dissertation will be to survey and analyze American writings on Maria Montessori and her educational system, in order to show how the idea of Montessori education has interacted with some changing American ideas and social forces. These changes in social and intellectual currents can be likened to a shift from centrifugal to centripetal force; or to the expansion and then the contraction of a universe. The central metaphor is the same. It is applicable to, and illustrative of, much about the changing social and educational scene in America. The writings on Montessori, examined against this framework, should provide a new view on certain changes in American educational thinking.

Language: English

Published: Kent, Ohio, 1973

Book

The Child, Society and the World: Unpublished Speeches and Writings

Maria Montessori - Writings

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Abstract/Notes: 'The Child, Society and the World: A Selection of Speeches and Writings' was first published in a German translation under the title 'Spannungsfeld Kind-Gesellschaft-Welt. Auf dem Wege zu einer Kopmischen Erziehung' in 1979 (Verlag Herder), coimpiled and edited by Günter Schulz-Benesch.

Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company, 2016

ISBN: 978-90-79506-34-7

Series: The Montessori Series , 7

Book

Basic Ideas of Montessori's Educational Theory: Extracts from Maria Montessori's Writings and Teachings

Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Maria Montessori - Writings, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Abstract/Notes: This book provides an analysis of Maria Montessori's educational beliefs and methodology and discusses her views on the important problems of education in the family and in the pre-school and school environments. It discusses religious education and its relationship to the child's natural development. The work also includes a biography of Montessori, extracts from a wide range of her published writings and an up-to-date bibliography. Translated from German.

Language: English

Published: Oxford: Clio Press, 1998

Edition: Revised ed.

ISBN: 978-1-85109-276-5

Series: The Clio Montessori series , 14

Book

The Child, Society and the World: Unpublished Speeches and Writings

Maria Montessori - Writings

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Language: English

Published: Oxford: Clio, 1998

ISBN: 978-1-85109-112-6 1-85109-112-2

Series: The Clio Montessori series

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Dilemma of Scripted Instruction: Comparing Teacher Autonomy, Fidelity, and Resistance in the Froebelian Kindergarten, Montessori, Direct Instruction, and Success for All

Available from: Teachers College Record

Publication: Teachers College Record, vol. 113, no. 3

Pages: 395-430

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Abstract/Notes: More than a century before modern controversies over scripted instruction, the Froebelian kindergarten--the original kindergarten method designed by Friedrich Froebel--and Maria Montessori's pedagogy were criticized for rigidly prescribing how teachers taught and children learned. Today, scripted methods such as Direct Instruction and Success for All are condemned for limiting teachers' autonomy and narrowing students' learning, especially that of students from low-income backgrounds, for and with whom scripts are often designed and used. Proponents of scripted instruction counter that it is helpful for teachers and effective with students. Comparing historical and modern scripts offers an opportunity to explore teachers' reactions to this hotly debated approach to school reform and to think about some possible implications for teacher education. I examine how teachers reacted to four different models of scripted instruction. I chose to compare the Froebelian kindergarten, Montessori, Direct Instruction, and Success for All because of their longevity, wide use, and the amount of information available about them. I focus on the scripts' theory and research base and teacher training, and on teachers' assessments of the scripts' effectiveness, and ask how these factors might influence teachers' autonomy, fidelity, and resistance when using scripts. Research Design: Using historical methods, I summarize the history of scripted instruction; selectively survey research on teacher autonomy, fidelity, and resistance; and interpret primary and secondary sources on the Froebelian kindergarten, Montessori, Direct Instruction, and Success for All. Teacher autonomy, fidelity, and resistance varied in these four scripts. Froebelian kindergarten and Montessori teachers autonomously chose to receive scripted, lengthy, intensive, pre-service training and professional development in closed professional learning communities. Direct Instruction and Success for All teachers receive scripted, relatively limited pre-service training and ongoing professional development in schools in which teachers often do not autonomously choose to teach. Despite the scripted training, most Froebelian kindergarten teachers, and many Montessori, Direct Instruction, and Success for All teachers modified these scripts at the classroom level; some Froebelian and Montessori teachers made very overt, substantial changes when the social class backgrounds of the students changed. Many Froebelian and most Montessori teachers seemed to believe that these scripts helped their students learn. Direct Instruction and Success for All teachers express more mixed views of these scripts' effectiveness. Some say that the scripts "work "for their students but that as teachers they feel constrained, a situation I see as a professional dilemma. Anecdotally, some new teachers with little pre-service training say that they feel limited by scripts but daunted by the task of creating curricula and instruction on their own. My research raises questions about teachers' reactions to scripts. The examples of Froebelian kindergarten, Montessori, Direct Instruction, and Success for All teachers I studied suggest that there may be unpredictable contradictions in scripted instruction. Scripted, autonomously chosen, intensive training may strengthen teacher fidelity and resistance, by giving teachers a deep repertoire of pedagogical skills that some continue to use and others use to autonomously modify scripts in response to students' perceived needs. Scripted, externally imposed, less extensive training may give some teachers a sense of security but also create tensions between the scripts 'perceived effectiveness and the teachers' desires for autonomy, and, for new teachers, between autonomy and the difficulty of independently designing curricula and methods. I argue that these reactions suggest that educators in traditional pre-service teacher education programs may want to experiment with offering an autonomous choice of distinctly different instructional models, including scripted ones such as Direct Instruction and Success for All, in which teachers in training in professional learning communities may become deeply skilled. I also argue that script developers may want to experiment with giving teachers more explicit autonomy, both in choosing scripts and in modifying them, and more extensive pre-service training. I recommend more comparative research on teachers' reactions to scripts, especially on new teachers. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Language: English

ISSN: 0161-4681, 1467-9620

Article

Pioniersarbeid op Montessoriaanse grondslag in het Emma-kinderziekenhuis te Amsterdam

Publication: Montessori Opvoeding, no. 3

Pages: 9-12

Children - Hospitals, Emma-Kinder-Ziekenhuis te Amsterdam, Europe, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education, Netherlands, Pediatric clinics, Western Europe, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: Dutch

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Tension Between Teacher Control and Children's Freedom in a Child-Centered Classroom: Resolving the Practical Dilemma Through a Closer Look at the Related Theories

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: Early Childhood Education Journal, vol. 35, no. 1

Pages: 33-39

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Abstract/Notes: This article explores the meaning of child-centeredness in Early Childhood Education (ECE), by shedding light on the nuanced tensions between teacher control and children’s freedom. While ECE professionals advocate the importance of children’s individual interests and needs in education, they diverge somewhat in their perspectives about the teacher’s role in education. This article manifests and tries to resolve this teaching dilemma through incorporating the related theories (Piaget, Vygotsky, Dewey, and Montessori) upholding and encompassing child-centeredness. The author contends that high teacher control and high children’s freedom are not exclusive of one another: children’s freedom is defined in an active way, as freedom to participate, rather than in a passive way, as freedom from any constrains. The paper concludes with a metaphor of “impressionist painting”, which may offer some insights helpful to those who have struggled with the tension between teacher control and children’s freedom in the context of progressive and critical pedagogy.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s10643-007-0166-7

ISSN: 1082-3301, 1573-1707

Article

Summertime Blues: Annual Dilemma or Annual Opportunity?

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 4, no. 3

Pages: 10

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Celebrations of Diversity: A Cross-Cultural Dilemma

Publication: Montessori International, vol. 78

Pages: 20–22

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Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

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