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497 results

Article

Visual Environmental Scale: Analysing the Early Childhood Education Environment

Available from: SpringerLink

Publication: Early Childhood Education Journal, vol. 47, no. 1

Pages: 43-51

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Abstract/Notes: Although children’s physical environments play an important role in their development, there have been few empirical studies on the interior design of early childhood centres. This is partly due to a lack of adequate methods and instruments for the systematic spatial investigation of educational environments. In light of this, the following paper presents a qualitative method for such systematic investigation, which we shall call visual environment analysis. It also presents the results of the application of this method to ten early childhood centre environments, which can be ranged between the two extremes of restraint and expressiveness. The analysis shows that early childhood centre environments may be shaped by partly conflicting aims, such as giving children as much freedom as possible on the one hand and providing them with a stimulating atmosphere on the other. The paper therefore discusses both visual environment analysis as a method and, in applying this method, the interior design of a number of educational environments.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s10643-018-0914-x

ISSN: 1082-3301, 1573-1707

Article

Can the Physical Environment Have an Impact on the Learning Environment?

Available from: OECD Library

Publication: CELE Exchange, Centre for Effective Learning Environments, no. 2010/13

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Abstract/Notes: How can designers create more innovative and sustainable learning environments? This paper argues in favour of challenging best practice” generally accepted by the architectural profession by embracing a responsive design approach. Such an approach accepts that the environment shapes the learner, and that learners influence their environment... [Also available in French]

Language: English

DOI: 10.1787/5km4g21wpwr1-en

Article

子どものための物理的環境とは何か [What Is a Child-Friendly Educational Environment?: A Lesson from the Children's Houses of Maria Montessori]

Available from: J-Stage

Publication: Journal of Human Environmental Studies, vol. 13, no. 1

Pages: 21-36

Classroom environment, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Prepared environment

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Abstract/Notes: This study aims to specify the essential nature of a child-friendly educational environment through an analysis of the Children's Houses for 3- to 6-year-old children planned by Maria Montessori whose philosophy and method have spread all over the world. Based on her theory of how children grow and develop, Montessori designed an educational method along with a unique physical environment in which to put it into practice. In the present study, an intensive content analysis of 12 Montessori's books, consisting of her own writings and dictations of her own lectures, was conducted and revealed: (1) Montessori's grand theory of child development governed her educational method and its physical environment which was essentially planned to evoke and support children's competence and autonomy, (2) The 8 properties of the physical environment, which were indispensable to the education of young children, were identified, e.g., the environment must (a) be attuned to children's body size and their physical and cognitive abilities; (b) be responsive to children's behavior; and (c) activate children's spontaneous activities, (3) These properties were surely embodied in the physical environment in all of the Montessori Children's Houses. What we can learn from Montessori, now and for the future, is discussed.

Language: Japanese

DOI: 10.4189/shes.13.21

ISSN: 1883-7611, 1348-5253

Master's Thesis

Mississippi River Program: A Mixed-Method Examination of the Effects of a Place-Based Curriculum on the Environmental Knowledge and Awareness of Montessori Adolescents

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Comparative education, Mississippi River Program, Sustainability

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Abstract/Notes: The Mississippi River Program was an interdisciplinary environmental education curriculum implemented in La Crosse, Wisconsin. The program integrated theory and practice of experiential, environmental, adventure, and place-based education, and was designed, implemented and assessed by the researcher. Effects of the Mississippi River Program on the environmental knowledge and awareness of middle school adolescents were unknown at the onset of this study. This was a quasi-experimental design involving non-random sampling of a charter Montessori Middle School as the experimental group (n=17), and a sample of public middle school students as the comparison group (n=18). A mixed-methods approach entailed quantitative assessment of mean pretest and posttest scores on the Environmental Knowledge and Beliefs Questionnaire, and a qualitative analysis of reflective papers written by the Montessori group. The research instrument was drawn directly from the state standards for environmental education for middle school adolescents, published by the Wisconsin Department of Instruction (1998). Results of ANOVA indicated a significant improvement in mean scores from pretest to posttest for the experimental group, with no significant difference in scores for the comparison group (p=.0002). Quantitative results revealed that Item Six of the survey instrument contributed significantly to the increase in scores (p=.0000). This Item required knowledge of environmental agencies, which the experimental group gained during “Outdoor Careers Day.” Student reflective papers written about experiences during this event were qualitatively assessed using an emergent open coding method, which revealed five environmental learning themes. Qualitative findings reinforced the quantitative results, indicating that the program participants improved significantly in knowledge of environmental content areas; and awareness of a personal relationship with, and responsibility to, the environment. Further investigations are needed to increase the research base for programs that incorporate multiple outdoor education models. Innovative educational approaches would also benefit from research on the long term effects of participation in these programs.

Language: English

Published: Mankato, Minnesota, 2006

Article

Sarah's Environment: Designing a Montessori Infant Environment at Home

Publication: Tomorrow's Child, vol. 5, no. 3

Pages: 11–13

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Earth-Conscious Art Materials on Early Childhood Montessori Students’ Environmental Awareness

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This action research project investigates the effect of providing earth-conscious materials in the art curriculum on early childhood Montessori students' environmental awareness. The participants for this study were seven preschool students at a private, home-based Montessori school in the urban Western United States. The research design was qualitative and quantitative, utilizing field notes, observational notes, behavioral tally sheets, and group conversational questionnaires to gather information on students' environmental awareness. The students' mean eco-affinity responses increased by 16%, while their mean environmental awareness responses increased by 23%. The frequency of material usage positively correlated with the frequency of environmental actions. The findings suggest that earth-conscious art materials have a positive effect on student environmental awareness. The researcher realized that increased environmental awareness does not indicate increased ecological stewardship. The conclusion of this study urges educators to reconsider the role that art curriculum and materials play on student environmental awareness.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2020

Master's Thesis

The Activity Preferences of Pre-School Children Exposed to an Environment Based on Montessorian Principles

Available from: University of the Orange Free State - Institutional Repository

Africa, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Preschool children, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Abstract/Notes: The initial purpose of the study was twofold: to assess the possibility of establishing a Montessori environment without formal training, and to determine the extent to which this was successful. The literature study undertaken investigated Montessori from a historical perspective, before detailing the elements of the theory necessary for establishment of a research environment. The positive value of Montessorianism was shown indisputably by an indepth investigation of the opportunities for fulfilling developmental tasks offered by the Montessori environment. The relationship between the theories of Montessori and Piaget was investigated. Extensive agreement as well as areas of disagreement were discovered, the latter mainly due to Piaget's epistemological approach as opposed to Montessori's concern with the needs for development. The research evaluation showed general positive effects of exposure to a Montessori environment. Results were however difficult to interpret due to differences and weaknesses in methodology. In the context of the nature of Montessorianism, an evaluation of process (the HOW of development as addressed by Montessori) is suggested in preference to the nomal product evaluation provided by purely testing procedures. A Montessori environment was established after careful consideration of the works of Maria Montessori. Construction of apparatus was undertaken. Children and facilitators were recruited on a voluntary basis. A total of 27 children were obtained. Two mature facilitators oversaw the running of the group. After a period of 6 months, allowed for settling in, naturalistic observation was begun. Observation was done by classification of the use of specific apparatus into broad activity categories. The proportion time each child engaged in a particular activity category was recorded. This data was summarized and analysed in order to investigate trends in development. The raw data was used for hypothesis testing. Four hypotheses were tested: a sensitive period for motor refinement was not confirmed using the Mann-Whitney U test; a sensitivity for pre-academic activities was confirmed, also using the Mann-Whitney U test; and a preference for functional play over fantasy play in the pre-school period was confirmed, using the parametric t-test. The fourth hypothesis, based on test data delivered by the Griffiths Developmental Scales affirmed the general facilitative effects of the research environment. The sign test was used. The presence of sensitive periods was taken as a sufficient indication that the research environment was "Montessorian", established and run without formal training. The test results proved the facilitativeness of the experience, further supporting the possibility of running a Montessori school without the expense of training. By way of conclusion it was suggested that further research be undertaken to establish the visibility of Montessori in the broader South African context, given the proof that the elitism engendered by expensive training and administration procedures of this approach is not warranted. Given also its benefits, proven elsewhere, the present study is considered a pilot study to further research on this subject in the wider cultural and ethnic conditions.

Language: English

Published: Bloemfontein, South Africa, 1987

Article

How the Montessori Upper Elementary and Adolescent Environment Naturally Integrates Science, Mathematics, Technology, and the Environment

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 41, no. 2

Pages: 83-97

Upper elementary

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Abstract/Notes: John McNamara shares his wisdom and humbly credits Camillo Grazzini, Jenny Höglund, and David Kahn for his growth in Montessori. Recognizing more than what he has learned from his mentors, he shares the lessons he has learned from his students themselves. Math, science, history, and language are so integrated in the curriculum that students comment they don't even think whether they are doing science or math. A schedule that allows time for students to follow a query to a conclusion is vital to the kinds of discoveries John's students make, such as a shortcut for multiplying binomials or reconfiguring cubing materials that made even John marvel at student independence and innovation. A bibliography is included. [This paper was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "A Montessori Integrated Approach to Science, Mathematics, Technology, and the Environment" in Portland, OR, Mar 31-Apr 3, 2016.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Prepared Environment, Peaceful Environment

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 6, no. 1

Pages: 4-5

Public Montessori

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Language: English

Article

Authentic Montessori: The Dottoressa’s View at the End of Her Life Part I: The Environment

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 5, no. 1

Pages: 1-18

Angeline Stoll Lillard - Writings, Classroom environment, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Prepared environment

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Abstract/Notes: Maria Montessori developed a form of education in the first half of the last century that came to be called by her surname, and research indicates it often has positive outcomes. In the years since its development, tens of thousands of schools worldwide have called their programs Montessori, yet implementations vary widely, leading to confusion about what Montessori education is. Although there are varied opinions, here we use Dr. Montessori’s books and transcribed lectures to describe the conclusions of her work at her life’s end. We term this final conclusion authentic in the sense of “done in the traditional or original way,” (the primary definition of the adjective in Oxford English Dictionary, 2019). We do not claim that the original is superior to variants; this is an issue for empirical science. Our overarching goal is to provide researchers, policy makers, administrators, teachers, and parents with a benchmark from which to measure and evaluate variations from the education method Dr. Montessori bequeathed at the end of her life. In the ongoing search for alternative educational methods, the time-honored and burgeoning Mon­tessori system is of considerable interest. Dr. Montessori conceptualized the system as a triangle for which the environment, the teacher, and the child formed the legs. Part I of this two-part article examines Dr. Montessori’s view of what constitutes the environment, in terms of its material, tem­poral, and social features. An appendix to Part II summarizes the features. In the ongoing search for alternative educational methods, the time-honored and burgeoning Montessori system is of considerable interest. Dr. Montessori conceptualized the system as a triangle for which the environment, the teacher, and the child formed the legs. Part I of this two-part article examines Dr. Montessori’s view of what constitutes the environment, in terms of its material, temporal, and social features. An appendix to Part II summarizes the features.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v5i1.7716

ISSN: 2378-3923

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