Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

505 results

Book Section

Experiential Learning Pedagogies and Practices

Available from: Springer Link

Book Title: Learning to Live Together Harmoniously: Spiritual Perspectives from Indian Classrooms

Pages: 129-153

Asia, Classroom environments, Comparative education, India, South Asia, Spirituality, Teachers

See More

Abstract/Notes: This chapter explores classroom practices for education for harmony. It emphasises the role of pedagogy (how to teach) over curricula (what to teach). It explores a range of pedagogical practices, including dialogic teaching, peer- and project-based learning, meditation, reflection, and social action. Thereafter, the chapter highlights the importance of a lived experience-based pedagogy as a means of bringing about an intrinsic form of education for harmony. Such pedagogy relies on embodied education, recognition that everything and everyone is a potential educator, as well as awareness that education is a continuous process that extends beyond textbooks, curricula, and schools’ four walls.

Language: English

Published: Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing, 2023

Edition: 1st ed.

ISBN: 978-3-031-23538-2 978-3-031-23539-9

Series: Spirituality, Religion, and Education , 6

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Caring Capacity: A Case for Multi-age Experiential Learning

Available from: University of California eScholarship

Publication: Electronic Green Journal, no. 9

See More

Abstract/Notes: The Caring Capacity: A Case for Multi-age Experiential Learning Jim Tangen-Foster and Laurel Tangen-Foster Moscow, Idaho Introduction When traveling from village to village, the Masai elders of East Africa have a greeting that translates to, How are the children? The greeting suggests that with the welfare of the children goes the welfare of the entire community. Our own experiences tell us that children who feel loved, appreciated, and cared for are more likely to love, appreciate, and care for others and for the environment. Children need to feel that they belong and that they have an identity within a group. They learn how to nurture through the experience of being nurtured. They learn respect for others and the environment through experiences with others in the natural environment. One of the most effective ways to instill such values is to provide opportunities for children to nurture and to be nurtured by other children and adults in an experiential environment. For nearly 20 years we have been involved in designing multi-age, experiential outdoor learning environments for children and youth ages 3 to 18 and for university under-graduate and graduate students. Our weekly, summer adventure camp at the University University of Idaho, Adventure Bound, involves four days of challenging activities, such as rock climbing, canoeing, orienteering, and ropes course activities, in wild areas within the Palouse region. Elementary-age students participate with junior high youth leaders, high school counselors, and university interns. Our school, Giant Steps, is in its eighth year of offering up to twenty students, ages 3 to 10, an alternative to traditional public and private schools. Both programs derive significant benefits from multi- age, hands-on experiences in natural environment settings. A fundamental goal of our multi-age curriculum at Giant Steps and Adventure Bound is to enable students of all ages to work, play, and learn together in an atmosphere of cooperation and mutualism. We would like to share what we, and other teachers and researchers, see as some of the benefits of the multi-age learning environment. We'll also describe some of the specifics of our experiential programs. Our long-held thesis, now our heuristic, is that the successful marriage of the multi-age school philosophy with outdoor, experiential education can

Language: English

DOI: 10.5070/G31910318

ISSN: 1076-7975

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

Circular Food Education: Developing a food education programme based on sustainability, experiential learning and pleasure in Irish primary schools

Available from: Technological University Dublin

See More

Abstract/Notes: This research explored how an expanded and sustained education about food within the primary school curriculum in the Republic of Ireland could be achieved. A constructivist ontology underpinned the project, with multiple theoretical frameworks related to constructivist learning and building agency, informing the study. A multi-method action research methodology was used, providing practical solutions through action, reflection, practice and theory. A narrative review of the literature and existing policy preceded three sections of fieldwork. A scoping consultation with key stakeholders was followed by the development and piloting of a food education programme entitled the Global Citizenship Food and Biodiversity Theme in eight primary schools over two years, in conjunction with Green-Schools. The third section of fieldwork verified and expanded the results within a research findings feedback workshop which included academics working in education, principals, teachers, trainee teachers, and two staff members from the National Council for Curriculum and Assessment. The scoping consultation with key stakeholders highlighted a desire for a changed approach to food education in Irish primary schools. The key findings indicated that schools are in a unique position to influence and promote food education, but that an expanded approach to the current curriculum’s principal focus on health and nutrition was required. The term ‘circular food education’ was coined to describe the approach to food education which was consequently developed. Circular food education encompasses experiential learning, sustainability and pleasure. It is grounded in theory and is an educational solution to tackling an array of social issues: building knowledge about climate change, biodiversity loss, and food waste, teaching practical food skills, as well as instilling the potential for children to become active citizens. The development and piloting of the Global Citizenship Food and Biodiversity Theme illustrated how educational approaches that stem from constructivism could be put into practice. This theme included hands-on classes as well as building agency to think critically through the use of collaborative and social learning methods. Amartya Sen’s capability approach was used as a theoretical framework to evaluate data generated from the pilot. The research findings feedback workshop indicated that increased circular food education would require support from the whole-school, a change in approach by government as well as teacher training to address confidence and agency, and the provision of suitable facilities. One of the outputs from the research is the Global Citizenship Food and Biodiversity Theme programme which is being implemented incrementally in schools on a nation-wide basis, with 120 locations to date. A limitation of the Global Citizenship Food and Biodiversity Theme is the two-year cycle of the Green-Schools flag system. The thesis recommends a systemic policy change to food education in Irish primary schools. An embedded full-time approach within the primary curriculum would provide structure and scaffolding but requires a collaborative approach from all stakeholders. Until then, an increase in teacher training and developing teacher agency would be a suitable first step to increased food education in Irish primary school classrooms. Circular food education offers a model, which helps provide students with the ability to lead a life in which both they, and the natural world, could flourish.

Language: English

Published: Dublin, Ireland, 2023

Article

Maria Montessori: From a Pedagogy of Learning Competence to a Theory on "Learning How to Learn"

Publication: MoRE Montessori Research Europe newsletter, no. 1

See More

Abstract/Notes: Paper abstract presented for the ECER Conference to be held in Berlin, Freie Universität (13-16 September, 2011)

Language: English

ISSN: 2281-8375

Article

Differences in Mathematical Understanding Between Brain-Based and Montessori Learning Viewed from Self-Regulated Learning

Available from: STKIP Kusuma Negara

Publication: Proceeding of International Conference on Education, vol. 2

Pages: 130-135

Mathematics education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

See More

Abstract/Notes: This study aims to know: (1) the difference in students’ mathematical understanding (SMU) between Brain Based Learning (BBL) and Montessori learning; (2) the difference in students’ Self-Regulated Learning (SRL) between Brain Based Learning (BBL) and Montessori learning; and (3) the difference in SMU between BBL and Montessori learning in each category of SRL. This quasi-experimental research applies a quantitative approach with a posttest only control group design. The selection of research samples was carried out using purpose sampling. The results of this study are: (1) there is no difference in understanding of mathematics between students who are taught with the BBL model or with the Montessori method; (2) there are no differences in SRL between learning classes; (3) there is no significant difference in SRL between categories in BBL and Montessori classes.

Language: English

ISSN: 2964-7479

Book Section

The Importance of Activity-based Learning for Mastering Mathematical Tasks during Distance Learning in Austria

Available from: IntechOpen

Book Title: STEM Education - Recent Trends and New Advances

See More

Abstract/Notes: The conversion of teaching to distance learning was a major challenge for all those involved in education. For elementary school-aged students, in particular, the transition was enormous, especially in mathematics. A research project in Austria investigated which features of activity-based, tools-supported mathematics instruction were helpful for mastering mathematical tasks during distance learning. The results of the research project show that action-oriented, tools-supported teaching, in which Maria Montessori’s didactic mathematics tools were used, was helpful for mastering mathematical tasks during the time of distance learning. By working with tools, the students were able to build up inner images of mathematical content and contexts. These inner images favored the process of abstraction, and they could fall back on these ideas during the time of distance learning.

Language: English

Published: London, England: IntechOpen, 2023

ISBN: 978-1-83769-256-9

Article

Metode Montessori: Implikasi Student-Centred Learning terhadap Pekembangan Anak di PAUD [The Montessori Method: Implications of Student-Centred Learning on Child Development in PAUD]

Available from: Jurnal Obsesi

Publication: Jurnal Obsesi: Jurnal Pendidikan Anak Usia Dini [Journal of Obsession: Journal of Early Childhood Education], vol. 7, no. 3

Pages: 2961-2976

Asia, Australasia, Indonesia, Southeast Asia

See More

Abstract/Notes: Dominasi guru dalam proses belajar masih banyak terlihat, salah satu buktinya saat terjadi pandemik Covid-19, siswa dan orang tua menjadi kebingungan ketika harus belajar dari rumah tanpa kehadiran guru secara langsung. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui implikasi student-centred learning terhadap perkembangan anak di PAUD Montessori Futura Indonesia, Lombok Barat. Penelitian menggunakan pendekatan kualitatif dengan jenis studi kasus dengan menggunakan wawancara, observasi, dan dokumentasi dalam pengumpulan data. Subyek penelitian berjumlah 10 siswa yang berusia antara 4-6 tahun. Hasil menunjukkan bahwa terdapat beberapa cara yang diterapkan oleh guru dalam pelaksanaan student-centred learning, yaitu: penggabungan usia, penyesuaian fasilitas dengan kebutuhan dan ukuran tubuh anak, menanamkan kemandirian dan mengurangi keterlibatan guru, menyediakan fasilitas bermain yang lengkap dan beragam, dan berkolaborasi dengan orang tua. Sedangkan implikasi student-centred learning terhadap perkembangan anak dapat terlihat dari beberapa pencapaian anak pada 6 aspek perkembangan yaitu aspek perkembangan nilai agama dan moral, fisik-motorik, kognitif, sosial-emosional, dan seni. Oleh sebab itu, guru perlu memberikan kesempatan kepada anak untuk mengeksplorasi lingkungan belajar dengan mempersiapkan kegiatan bermain sesuai kebutuhan anak.

Language: Indonesian

DOI: 10.31004/obsesi.v7i3.3323

ISSN: 2549-8959

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Pembelajaran Matematika di TK GMIM 236 Liandok: Pembelajaran Matematika [Learning Mathematics in Kindergarten GMIM 236 Liandok: Learning Mathematics]

Available from: Institut Agama Kristen Negeri Manado (Indonesia)

Publication: Montessori Jurnal Pendidikan Kristen Anak Usia Dini, vol. 3, no. 1

Pages: 35-42

Asia, Australasia, Indonesia, Southeast Asia

See More

Abstract/Notes: Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mendeskripsikan Pembelajaran matematika di TK GMIM 236 Liandok, Kecamatan Tenga, Kabupaten Minahasa Selatan, Sulawesi Utara. Ada 3 hal utama yang diangkat dalam penelitian ini yaitu pembelajran matematika, pembelajaran matematika AUD, metode yang digunakan guru dalam pengajaran matematika. Penelitan ini menggunakan jenis pendekatan kualitatif. Prosedur pengumpulan data yang digunakan  yaitu wawancara dan dokumentasi . Sumber-sumber data dari penelitian ini yaitu Kepala Sekolah  serta guru bantu di TK GMIM 236 Liandok. Hasil penelitian menunjukka proses pembelajaran di sekolah tersebut terlebih khusus dalam pengenalan matematika sudah terealisasi karena pembelajarannya sudah memperhatikan konsep serta usia dari peserta didiknya. Adapun pengajarkan matematika selama dilaksankannya pembelajaran di sekolah tersebut dilakukan dengan cara anak sambil bermain dengan anak lainnya  dan membuat permainan sederhana dari barang-barang bekas dilingkungan sekitar. Kata Kunci : Pembelajaran, matematika, Anak usia dini. Abstract Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mendeskripsikan pembelajaran matematika di TK GMIM 236 Liandok, Kecamatan Tenga, Kabupaten Minahasa Selatan, Sulawesi Utara. Ada 3 hal pokok yang diangkat dalam penelitian ini yaitu pembelajaran matematika, pembelajaran matematika AUD, metode yang digunakan guru dalam pembelajaran matematika. Penelitian ini menggunakan pendekatan kualitatif. Prosedur pengumpulan data yang digunakan adalah wawancara dan dokumentasi. Sumber data dari penelitian ini adalah kepala sekolah dan guru pendamping di TK GMIM 236 Liandok. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa proses pembelajaran di sekolah khususnya dalam pengenalan matematika telah terwujud karena pembelajaran telah memperhitungkan konsep dan usia siswa.

Language: Indonesian

DOI: 10.51667/mjpkaud.v3i1.952

ISSN: 2798-6195

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Learning Management with Montessori by Bringing the Trisikkhā Principles, Precepts, Concentration and Wisdom to Integrate in Learning Management

Available from: ASEAN Journal of Religious and Cultural Research

Publication: ASEAN Journal of Religious and Cultural Research, vol. 6, no. 2

Pages: 10-14

Asia, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Southeast Asia, Thailand

See More

Abstract/Notes: This academic article reflects the thoughts from attending the workshop, promotion of learning management based on the Montessori concept uses writing from real experience in the practice as an observer from the early childhood classroom and first-class classrooms that provides teaching with the Montessori concept. The results reflected the ideas from direct experiences from the workshop participants, showing that the atmosphere in the classroom arrangement was bulging good ventilation, beautiful colors, work, interior colors feel cool and comfortable. The room has a fan enough light shelf arrangement separated into media; beautiful, durable, beautiful colors arranged from top to bottom. Characters are clearly visible and durable. Teachers interact with children in order to allow children to concentrate on themselves. The role of the teacher is to be a mentor to guide the children towards achieving their goals. The students and the students’ joint activities to achieve common goals. The result of the observation made the children absorb the threefold principle, namely, the child had precepts indicating that the collection of things was organized, neat, not separating the workpiece, compassionate to help friends, concentration and mindfulness having determination to complete the work. Intellectually, children are knowledgeable, ppossessing the ability to think step by step, distinguish work pieces assemble words and be able to solve problems easily by yourself.

Language: English

ISSN: 2587-0017

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Task-based Language Learning in Bilingual Montessori Elementary Schools: Customizing Foreign Language Learning and Promoting L2 Speaking Skills

Available from: Universität Bern (Switzerland)

Publication: Linguistik Online, vol. 54, no. 4

Pages: 69-83

Bilingualism, Language acquisition

See More

Abstract/Notes: Foreign language learning has been a part of German elementary schools for several years now. Montessori schools focusing on individual learning, i.e. mostly independent from the teacher and based on auto-education, interest, and free choice, are also asked to teach an L2. The original lack of a concept of L2 learning for this environment has brought forth different approaches. Bilingual education seems to be feasible and applicable in Montessori education. The downside to this is that even in a bilingual classroom the Montessori way of learning may not allow for very much oral production of the foreign language. The role of L2 production (cf. Swain 1985, 1995, 2005) for language acquisition has been theoretically claimed and empirically investigated. Output can have a positive influence on L2 learning (cf. e.g. Izumi 2002, Keck et al. 2006). This also applies to interaction (cf. Long 1996), where negotiation of meaning and modified output are factors supporting L2 development (cf. e.g. de la Fuente 2002, McDonough 2005). Task-based Language Learning (TBLL) presents itself as one way to promote oral language production and to provide opportunities for meaning-negotiation. Especially tasks with required information exchange and a closed outcome have been shown to be beneficial for the elicitation of negotiation of meaning and modified output. This paper argues that TBLL is a promising approach for the facilitation of L2 production and thus the development of speaking skills in a Montessori context. It also hypothesizes that TBLL can be implemented in a bilingual Montessori environment while still making the Montessori way of learning possible. Different tasks on various topics, examples of which are presented in this article, can lay the foundation for this. Offering such tasks in a bilingual Montessori elementary classroom promises to foster language production and the use of communication strategies like negotiation of meaning, both being facilitative for L2 acquisition. This hypothesis remains to be tested in future research.

Language: German

DOI: 10.13092/lo.54.284

ISSN: 1615-3014

Advanced Search