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528 results

Article

Exploring Fantasy in Children's Literature

Publication: Montessori International, vol. 84

Pages: 40–41

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Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Magic School Bus Dilemma: How Fantasy Affects Children’s Learning from Stories

Available from: ScienceDirect

Publication: Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, vol. 210

Pages: Article 105212

Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Fantasy in children

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Abstract/Notes: Although children’s books often include fantasy, research suggests that children do not learn as well from fantastical stories as from realistic ones. The current studies investigated whether the type of fantasy matters, in effect testing two possible mechanisms for fantasy’s interference. Across two studies, 110 5-year-olds were read different types of fantastical stories containing a problem and then were asked to solve an analogous problem in a real lab setting. Children who were read a minimally fantastical version of the story, in which the story occurred on another planet “that looked just like Earth,” were no more likely to transfer the solution than children who heard a story that was slightly more fantastical in that the story occurred on another planet and that planet looked different from Earth (e.g., orange grass, a green sky). In contrast, significantly higher rates of learning were observed when the story contained those elements and two physically impossible events (e.g., walking through walls). Furthermore, this improvement was obtained only when the impossible events preceded, and not when they followed, the educational content. Although fantasy may sometimes detract from learning (as other research has shown), these new studies suggest that minimal fantasy does not and that particular types of fantasy may even increase learning. We propose that the mechanism for this may be that a small dose of impossible events induces deeper processing of the subsequent events in the story.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1016/j.jecp.2021.105212

ISSN: 0022-0965

Article

Primary Children [Writings by children in 9-12 class]

Publication: Montessori Matters

Pages: 6–7

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Language: English

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Children’s Preference for Real Activities: Even Stronger in the Montessori Children’s House

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 4, no. 2

Pages: 1-9

Americas, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: In the United States, children are often given the opportunity to engage in pretend activities; many believe this kind of play benefits children’s development. Recent research has shown, though, that when children ages 4 to 6 are given a choice to do the pretend or the real version of 9 different activities, they would prefer the real one. The reasons children gave for preferring real activities often concerned their appreciation of the functionality; when children did prefer pretend activities, their reasons often cited being afraid of, not allowed to, or unable to do the real activity. Given that children in Montessori classrooms have more experience performing real, functional activities, in this study we asked if this preference for real activities is even stronger among children in Montessori schools. We also asked children to explain their preferences. The data are from 116 3- to 6-year-old children (M = 59.63 months, SD = 12.08 months; 68 female): 62 not in Montessori schools and 54 in Montessori schools. Children explained their preferences for pretendand real versions of 9 different activities. Children in Montessori schools preferred real activities even more than did children in other preschools, but all children explained their choices in similar ways. The implications of these results are discussed with regard to play in preschool classrooms.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v4i2.7586

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

Montessoribarn är de värsta barnen vi kan få hit [Montessori children are the worst children we can get here]

Publication: Montessori-tidningen (Svenska montessoriförbundet), no. 3

Pages: 26

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Language: Swedish

ISSN: 1103-8101

Article

Schoolchildren Help Schoolchildren [Gilbachstrasse Montessori School, Cologne, Germany]

Publication: Communications (Association Montessori Internationale, 195?-2008), vol. 1983, no. 1

Pages: 25–29

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Abstract/Notes: Reprinted from Kolner Presse

Language: English

ISSN: 0519-0959

Article

What Children Love . . . What Children Hate . . .

Publication: Montessori Education, vol. 8, no. 4

Pages: 34–35, 39

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Language: English

ISSN: 1354-1498

Book

Talent for the future: social and personality development of gifted children: Proceedings of the Ninth world conference on gifted and talented children

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Language: English

Published: Assen, The Netherlands: Van Gorcum & Co., 1992

ISBN: 90-232-2656-9

Article

Another Story of the Montessori Children; Raffaelo's Hunger: How the New Way of Helping Children to Find Themselves Opened the Eyes and Soul of a Baby

Available from: HathiTrust

Publication: Delineator, vol. 84, no. 1

Pages: 8

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Language: English

Article

Integrated Edcuaton of Healthy Children and Children with Multiple and Variable Disorders

Publication: Communications (Association Montessori Internationale, 195?-2008), vol. 1981, no. 1/2

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Special education

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Language: English

ISSN: 0519-0959

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