Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

154 results

Article

Foreign Language Immersion: Something New in Chicago [InterCultura Foreign Language Immersion School, Oak Park, Illinois]

Publication: El Boletin [Comité Hispano Montessori], no. 22

Pages: 1

Americas, Comité Hispano Montessori - Periodicals, Language acquisition, North America, United States of America

See More

Language: English

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Preschool Experience in 10 Countries: Cognitive and Language Performance at Age 7

Available from: ScienceDirect

Publication: Early Childhood Research Quarterly, vol. 21, no. 3

Pages: 313-331

See More

Abstract/Notes: The IEA Preprimary Project is a longitudinal, cross-national study of preprimary care and education designed to identify how process and structural characteristics of the settings children attended at age 4 are related to their age-7 cognitive and language performance. Investigators collaborated to develop common instruments to measure family background, teachers’ characteristics, setting structural characteristics, experiences of children in settings, and children’s developmental status. Data from 10 countries are included in the analysis; in most countries, the sample of settings is representative of preprimary settings in that country. For the analysis, a 3-level hierarchical linear model was employed that allowed decomposition of variation of child outcomes into three parts—variation among children within settings, among settings within countries, and among countries. Four findings are consistent across all of the countries included. Age-7 language improves as teachers’ number of years of full-time schooling increases and the predominant type of activity teachers propose in settings is free choice rather than personal/social. Age-7 cognitive performance improves as children spend less time in whole group activities and the variety of equipment and materials available increases. There were also a number of findings that varied across countries depending on particular country characteristics. The findings support child-initiated activities and small group activities and are consistent with developmentally appropriate practices promoting active learning.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1016/j.ecresq.2006.07.007

ISSN: 0885-2006, 1873-7706

Article

Humanistic Methods in Foreign Language Teaching

Available from: Central and Eastern European Online Library

Publication: Euromentor Journal: Studies about Education, vol. 3, no. 3

Pages: 71-79

⛔ No DOI found

See More

Abstract/Notes: The psychological research and changes occurred in pedagogical thinking have led to new methods in foreign language teaching called “humanistic methods” or “fringe methods” which focus on some aspects neglected by the traditional strategies: feelings, emotions, interpersonal relationships: suggestopedia, first an experimental method belonging to suggestology, has become a psychological method of teaching and learning foreign languages based mainly on indirect suggestion which appeals to a peripheral subliminal; the silent way, which stems from the trend initiated by the Italian specialist in pedagogy Maria Montessori is based on the fact that the process of learning a foreign language is a natural one, which children perform involuntarily; cooperative learning, whose roots are in the counseling techniques of psychotherapy, is greatly based on group dynamics; the total physical response, which originates in the action-based methods, refers to the learner’s reaction, to the instructions received from the teacher and it has been a successful method to teach foreign language for children.

Language: English

Master's Thesis

Poučevanje tujih jezikov v montessori in waldorfskih šolah ter v vrtcih v Sloveniji / Fremdsprachenunterricht an Montessori und Waldorfschulen und Kindergärten in Slowenien [Foreign language teaching at Montessori and Waldorf schools and kindergartens in Slovenia]

Available from: Digital Library of the University of Maribor (DKUM)

Comparative education, Europe, Language acquisition, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Second language acquisition, Slovenia, Southern Europe, Waldorf method of education, Waldorf schools

See More

Abstract/Notes: Magistrsko delo se posveča alternativnim šolam in vrtcem v Sloveniji na primeru pristopov montessori in waldorf. Ti dve vrsti šol, ki so ju običajno ustanovili starši, postajata v Sloveniji v zadnjih letih vedno bolj priljubljeni. Namen magistrskega dela ju je primerjati in analizirati, torej podrobneje preučiti filozofiji waldorf in montessori šol, njun položaj v svetu in v Sloveniji ter znotraj tega njuno poučevanje tujih jezikov. V nadaljevanju magistrskega dela sledi opis izobraževanja za učitelje pri enem in pri drugem sistemu, torej waldorf in montessori. Navajamo tudi, kdo so znane osebnosti obeh šol in kaj o njuni teoriji, razlikah in podobnostih ter primerjavi z ustaljenim šolskim sistemom ugotavljajo mednarodne in domače raziskave. Sledi opis organiziranosti teh šol in vrtcev v Sloveniji. V empiričnem delu se ukvarjamo s podobnostmi in razlikami obeh šol. Skušamo odgovoriti na vprašanje, kakšno vlogo igrajo te alternativne šole v našem šolskem sistemu. Primerjalno opišemo tudi učne načrte obeh šol s poudarkom na področju poučevanja tujih jezikov. S pomočjo intervjujev in opazovanj pouka tujega jezika skušamo predstaviti sliko realnega šolskega življenja v teh alternativnih šolah. / Die vorliegende Magisterarbeit widmet sich Alternativschulen und Kindergärten, und zwar den Montessori- und Waldorfschulen in Slowenien. In Slowenien bekommen diese aus Elterninitiativen entstandenen Schulen in letzter Zeit neuen Schwung. Der Zweck der Magisterarbeit ist die Montessori- und Waldorfschulen gegenüberzustellen und sie zu analysieren, insbesondere im Bereich der Fremdsprachen. Zuerst befasst sich die Magisterarbeit mit der Montessori-Schule und ihrer Philosophie, ihrer Lage weltweit und in Slowenien und mit dem dort ausgeführten Fremdsprachenunterricht. Im Weiteren wird untersucht, wie man ein Montessori- oder Waldorf-Pädagoge wird, wer bekannte Montessori- oder Waldorf Personen sind und was die Forschung empfiehlt. Es folgt die Beschreibung der Organisation der Montessori- oder Waldorfschulen und Kindergärten im slowenischen Raum. Der empirische Teil befasst sich mit den Ähnlichkeiten und Unterschieden der beiden Alternativschulen. Der Frage, welche Rollen diese beiden Alternativschulen in slowenischem Schulsystem spielen, wird ebenfalls nachgegangen. Die Lehrpläne der beiden Schulen wurden verglichen, insbesondere im Bereich der Fremdsprachen. Mit den Interviews und den Unterrichtsbeobachtungen wird ein Bild des realen schulischen Lebens in beiden Alternativschulen dargestellt. [This master’s thesis is dedicated to alternative schools and kindergartens, namely the Montessori and Waldorf schools in Slovenia. In Slovenia, these schools, which were created from parents' initiatives, have recently been gaining momentum. The purpose of the master’s thesis is to compare the Montessori and Waldorf schools and to analyze them, especially in the field of foreign languages. First, the master’s thesis deals with the Montessori school and its philosophy, its situation worldwide and in Slovenia and with the foreign language teaching carried out there. It also examines how to become a Montessori or Waldorf teacher, who are known Montessori or Waldorf people and what research recommends. The following is a description of the organization of the Montessori or Waldorf schools and kindergartens in the Slovenian region. The empirical part deals with the similarities and differences between the two alternative schools. The question of what roles these two alternative schools play in the Slovenian school system will also be investigated. The curricula of the two schools were compared, particularly in the field of foreign languages. With the interviews and the observation of lessons, a picture of the real school life in both alternative schools is presented.]

Language: Slovenian

Published: Maribor, Slovenia, 2017

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Montessori Method for Strengthening Communication Skills in English as a Foreign Language in Young Children / Método Montessori para el Fortalecimiento de las Habilidades de Comunicación en Inglés como Lengua Extranjera en Niños Pequeños

Available from: European Journal of English Language Teaching

Publication: European Journal of English Language Teaching, vol. 7, no. 1

Pages: 104-126

See More

Abstract/Notes: This work aims to strengthen the communication skills in English as a Foreign Language of young children in Ecuadorian elementary schools. It used the action research method and a combination of qualitative and quantitative research approaches. The sample consists of 10 children of the second grade of elementary school and their parents. All they have permanent residence in the province of Manabi, Ecuador. The researcher team designed an educational intervention based on the Montessori Methodology to improve participants’ communication skills in English as a Foreign Language. The educational intervention lasted 6 months and used the contains of the second grade of the elementary education curriculum of Ecuador. The instruments used for data collection were in-deep interviews, class observation, and the vocabulary acquisition test of Windi (2017). The results showed that all participants improved in 3-4 points their scores of English communication skills from pre-test in comparison to post-test. It concluded that 100% of young children that participated in this research improved their communication skills in English as a Foreign Language when supported the instruction with Montessori Methodology. / Este trabajo tiene como objetivo fortalecer las habilidades de comunicación en inglés como lengua extranjera de los niños pequeños en las escuelas primarias ecuatorianas. Utilizó el método de investigación de acción y una combinación de enfoques de investigación cualitativos y cuantitativos. La muestra está compuesta por 10 niños del segundo grado de primaria y sus padres. Todos ellos tienen residencia permanente en la provincia de Manabí, Ecuador. El equipo de investigadores diseñó una intervención educativa basada en la Metodología Montessori para mejorar las habilidades comunicativas de los participantes en inglés como lengua extranjera. La intervención educativa tuvo una duración de 6 meses y utilizó los contenidos del segundo grado del currículo de educación básica del Ecuador. Los instrumentos utilizados para la recolección de datos fueron entrevistas en profundidad, observación de clases y la prueba de adquisición de vocabulario de Wendi (2017). Los resultados mostraron que todos los participantes mejoraron en 3-4 puntos sus puntajes de habilidades de comunicación en inglés desde la prueba previa en comparación con la prueba posterior. Se concluyó que el 100% de los niños pequeños que participaron en esta investigación mejoraron sus habilidades comunicativas en inglés como lengua extranjera cuando se apoyó en la instrucción con la Metodología Montessori.

Language: English

DOI: 10.46827/ejel.v7i1.3987

ISSN: 2501-7136

Doctoral Dissertation

Language Learning and Technology in and for a Global World

Available from: University of California eScholarship

See More

Abstract/Notes: More than ever before, schools and societies are looking to educate children in and for a global world. In the United States, these efforts have taken the form of increased interest in incorporating global or international perspectives into educational curricula, programs, and policy over the past decade (Hayden, 2011; Parker, 2011; U.S. Department of Education, 2012). Despite this interest in what I call global education, ambiguity remains regarding what it means to provide an education for a globalized world, both in terms of its underlying motivations and its ultimate execution in practice (Ortloff, Shah, Lou, & Hamilton, 2012).Two components often placed at the heart of these efforts in the United States—second/foreign language and digital technology—both reflect and contribute to understandings of global education. This study, rooted in an ecological theorization of discourse, asked how different school actors (teachers, administrators, parents, and students) position these two components in education today, how these positionings differ across groups, and what this means for understandings of global education. These questions were investigated through two complementary approaches: a survey distributed to a large cross-section of schools around the United States and an in-depth focal case study of one school. The survey was distributed to teachers, students, parents, and administrators at a broad range of U.S. secondary schools and assessed perceptions of second/foreign language and digital technology in education today. The focal case study focused on two secondary classrooms at a multilingual immersion K-8 school in the western US over a four-month period; data collection included field notes, analytic memos, and audio/video recordings from participant observations as well as multiple rounds of interviews with five students, four teachers, two administrators, and three parents. Data were analyzed using iterative rounds of inductive and deductive coding (Miles & Huberman, 1994; Saldaña, 2009) and critical discourse analysis (Blommaert, 2005; Fairclough, 2001).Findings suggest that second/foreign language and digital technology were positioned in a range of different ways that had concrete ramifications for schools and that built up divergent understandings of global education. The survey component of the study highlighted common discourses reproduced across groups, including: second/foreign language learning as a way to promote cultural understanding and awareness as well as economic opportunity; or digital technology as a threat to learning and as an omnipresent necessity. The focal school offered a more detailed look into these different discourses and their reproduction across groups. Analysis revealed trended similarities and differences across groups. For example, even though parents, teachers, and administrators often articulated a similar understanding of second/foreign language and digital technology, parental actions suggested more alignment with economic-based understandings of these two components. These differences in how second/foreign language and digital technology should be positioned within a global education created a “battle” between parents and the focal school as well as tension within the learning environment. The impact of these discourses and battles on students was unclear: while students at times voiced the discourses that their parents, teachers, and administrators reproduced, data also suggests that students were influenced by outside sources. These findings suggest that resulting understandings of global education were multiple and divergent across school groups. Data analysis also revealed the potential that anxiety, concern, or even fear of globalization and its effects could undergird adult understandings of second/foreign language and of digital technology: beneath economic as well as cultural motivations for second/foreign language and for digital technology learning resided trepidation about a changing world, changing identities, and the unknowns that lay ahead. This suggests that, underneath multiple and complex discourses, there can be a singular discourse that manifests in different ways, nuancing understandings of ecological approaches to discourse. It also suggests that different understandings of global education could stem from the same place: fear or anxiety in the face of a globalizing world. These findings highlight the need for a global education that equips students to navigate a changing world, its challenges, and any potential fears that may arise from these changes and challenges. The study concludes with a pedagogical framework built around discourse analysis that could offer students tools to understand their globalizing world.

Language: English

Published: Berkeley, California, 2017

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Task-based Language Learning in Bilingual Montessori Elementary Schools: Customizing Foreign Language Learning and Promoting L2 Speaking Skills

Available from: Universität Bern (Switzerland)

Publication: Linguistik Online, vol. 54, no. 4

Pages: 69-83

Bilingualism, Language acquisition

See More

Abstract/Notes: Foreign language learning has been a part of German elementary schools for several years now. Montessori schools focusing on individual learning, i.e. mostly independent from the teacher and based on auto-education, interest, and free choice, are also asked to teach an L2. The original lack of a concept of L2 learning for this environment has brought forth different approaches. Bilingual education seems to be feasible and applicable in Montessori education. The downside to this is that even in a bilingual classroom the Montessori way of learning may not allow for very much oral production of the foreign language. The role of L2 production (cf. Swain 1985, 1995, 2005) for language acquisition has been theoretically claimed and empirically investigated. Output can have a positive influence on L2 learning (cf. e.g. Izumi 2002, Keck et al. 2006). This also applies to interaction (cf. Long 1996), where negotiation of meaning and modified output are factors supporting L2 development (cf. e.g. de la Fuente 2002, McDonough 2005). Task-based Language Learning (TBLL) presents itself as one way to promote oral language production and to provide opportunities for meaning-negotiation. Especially tasks with required information exchange and a closed outcome have been shown to be beneficial for the elicitation of negotiation of meaning and modified output. This paper argues that TBLL is a promising approach for the facilitation of L2 production and thus the development of speaking skills in a Montessori context. It also hypothesizes that TBLL can be implemented in a bilingual Montessori environment while still making the Montessori way of learning possible. Different tasks on various topics, examples of which are presented in this article, can lay the foundation for this. Offering such tasks in a bilingual Montessori elementary classroom promises to foster language production and the use of communication strategies like negotiation of meaning, both being facilitative for L2 acquisition. This hypothesis remains to be tested in future research.

Language: German

DOI: 10.13092/lo.54.284

ISSN: 1615-3014

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

A Critical Enquiry into the Implementation of the Montessori Teaching Method as a First Step Towards Inclusive Practice in Early Childhood Settings Specifically in Developing Countries

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood, vol. 9, no. 2

Pages: 178-181

Asia, Comparative education, Malaysia, Southeast Asia

See More

Abstract/Notes: The analysis was carried out as part of a master's thesis and it aimed to analyse the extent to which the Montessori educational philosophy and teaching method incorporated inclusive educational qualities. The Montessori Method was first developed for children who were disadvantaged and considered 'idiots', in the slums of Italy's San Lorenzo. With the usage of her didactic materials, Maria Montessori proved that the children in question were indeed educable given the correct type of instruction. The focus of this article is on the inclusive qualities embedded within the Montessori philosophy and teaching method, which can be reason enough for it to be adopted by developing countries that have limited budgets/funding for the purpose of special education. This method could prove to be an easy alternative for the immediate implementation of early childhood inclusive education for countries such as Malaysia which do not yet possess specific legislation governing special education.

Language: English

DOI: 10.2304/ciec.2008.9.2.178

ISSN: 1463-9491

Article

Becoming and Being the Foreign Language Specialist in Your Classroom [preview of presentation at 2001 summer conference]

Publication: AMI Elementary Alumni Association Newsletter, vol. 33, no. 3

Pages: 7

See More

Language: English

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Increasing Student Motivation in a Foreign Language Classroom Through Mindfulness

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

See More

Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to explore how mindfulness practices help increase motivation in high school students in a foreign language classroom. This study was conducted at a small school in an urban area in Texas. Nineteen students between the ninth and tenth grades were the participants in this research. The data collection included a pre and post motivational questionnaire that helped identify how motivated the students felt in the classroom. Data was collected on each participant through weekly self-assessments. The results of this action research showed that the implementation of mindfulness practices helped to increase the motivation of the students in the high school Spanish class. The action research project was conducted at the beginning of the second semester of the school year with a duration of four weeks.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2020

Advanced Search