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Book Section

The Rise and Fall of Anne George as America’s Premier Montessori Educator

Available from: Springer Link

Book Title: America's Early Montessorians: Anne George, Margaret Naumburg, Helen Parkhurst and Adelia Pyle

Pages: 101-143

Americas, Anne E. George - Biographic sources, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Anne E. George, the first American trained as a directress by Montessori in 1910, is significant as the paramount Montessori educator in the United States from 1910 to 1915. George, who established the first American Montessori school in Tarrytown, New York in 1911, was also the English-language translator of Montessori’s book, The Montessori Method (1912). Alexander Graham Bell and his wife, Mabel, intent on promoting Montessori education, established the national Montessori Educational Association, with George as its Director of Research. George was also the headmistress of the Montessori schools supported by the Bells in Washington, DC. In addition, George was Montessori’s aide and translator during her extensive lecture tour in 1913. Montessori’s relationship with George deteriorated. Montessori revoked Anne George’s credentials as a Montessori directress in 1915. The ever-loyal George, who strived to replicate the Montessori Method in American private schools, and, once, the premier American Montessori educator, was discredited by her mentor. After her marriage in 1919, George never returned to the field of education.

Language: English

Published: Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020

ISBN: 978-3-030-54835-3

Series: Historical Studies in Education

Book

Neue Aspekte der Reformpädagogik: Studien zur Anthropologie und Pädagogik bei Kerschensteiner, Dewey und Montessori

Educational change, Georg Kerschensteiner - Biographic sources, Georg Kerschensteiner - Philosophy, John Dewey - Philosophy, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Philosophy

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Language: German

Published: Heidelberg, Germany: Quelle & Meyer, 1968

Edition: 2nd ed.

Series: Anthropologie und Erziehung , 11

Book

Neue Aspekte der Reformpädagogik: Studien zur Anthropologie und Pädagogik bei Kerschensteiner, Dewey und Montessori

Educational change, Georg Kerschensteiner - Biographic sources, Georg Kerschensteiner - Philosophy, John Dewey - Philosophy, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Philosophy

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Language: German

Published: Heidelberg, Germany: Quelle & Meyer, 1964

Series: Anthropologie und Erziehung , 11

Book

Entwicklungstendenzen in der Reformpädagogik und im Grundschullehrplan aus dem Jahre 1986: bei Hugo Gaudig, Georg Kerschensteiner, Maria Montessori

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Language: German

Published: [Wien]: [s.n.], 1995

Article

Survivor: Strong Program and Parent Support Save Prince George's Program Amid Cuts [Prince George's County, Maryland]

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 16, no. 3

Pages: 1, 18

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

“The Ayn Rand School for Tots”: John Dewey, Maria Montessori, and Objectivist Educational Philosophy during the Postwar Years

Available from: Historical Studies in Education (Canada)

Publication: Historical Studies in Education/Revue d'histoire de l'éducation, vol. 25, no. 1

John Dewey - Philosophy, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Objectivism (Philosophy) - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Progressive education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Abstract/Notes: Objectivism, the libertarian philosophy established by Ayn Rand during the postwar years, has attracted a great deal of attention from philosophers, political scientists, economists, and English professors alike in recent years, but it hasn’t received much notice from historians with an interest in education. This article will address that problem by discussing how Rand and her followers established a philosophy of education during the 1960s and 1970s that was based, in part, on vilifying the so-called collectivist ideas of John Dewey and lionizing the so-called individualist ideas of Maria Montessori. Unfortunately, the narrative that emerged during this time seriously misrepresented the ideas of both Dewey and Montessori, resulting in a somewhat distorted view of both educators.

Language: English

DOI: 10.32316/hse/rhe.v25i1.4285

ISSN: 0843-5057, 1911-9674

Doctoral Dissertation

Per un'educazione al pensiero complesso Metodo Montessori e Philosophy for Children: connessioni e sconfinamenti

Available from: AMS Dottorato - Institutional Theses Repository (University of Bologna Digital Library)

Comparative education, Montessori method of education, Philosophy for Children

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Abstract/Notes: La presente ricerca, di impianto teorico, si prefigge lo scopo di indagare - all’interno della cornice teorica del problematicismo pedagogico - le connessioni tra due proposte educative che concorrono alla promozione dell’esercizio del pensiero complesso già nell’infanzia: il Metodo elaborato da Maria Montessori e la Philosophy for Children sviluppata da Matthew Lipman. Attingendo alla bibliografia scientifica di riferimento, sia nazionale sia internazionale, e a partire dalle connessioni individuate, si arrischiano sconfinamenti in saperi altri: sostando in ambiti di ricerche, apparentemente lontani, vengono interrogate le teorie dell’apprendimento, i rapporti con le tecnologie, fino al confronto con le interessanti conferme che emergono dalle recenti ricerche neuroscientifiche. La scelta dell’oggetto della ricerca nasce da una riflessione relativa all’emergere di fenomeni di negazione dell’infanzia e dei suoi diritti; ra gli altri, il diritto al pensiero. Sembra necessario richiamare alla responsabilità di accompagnare l’infanzia sulle strade della complessità nella cittadinanza GLocale. In questa direzione, le proposte educative prese in esame sembrano offrire, a partire dall’infanzia, modalità diversificate e divergenti delle esperienze di conoscere, sentire, comunicare alle quali poter attingere come bambini e bambine e nelle successive età della vita. Con il presente lavoro di ricerca, che mi ha vista impegnata in diverse forme per tre ricchi e intensi anni, ho tentato di mettere al centro della riflessione l’esercizio del pensiero che emerge come imprescindibile responsabilità educativa a cui i dispositivi propri del Metodo Montessori e della Philosophy for Children possono contribuire a corrispondere. [The research undertaken for this doctoral thesis - within the theoretical framework of pedagogical problematicism - explores the connections between two educational proposals that contribute to the promotion of the exercise of complex thought already since childhood: the Method elaborated by Maria Montessori and the Philosophy for Children developed by Matthew Lipman. With reference to the scientific bibliography, both national and international, this work matches Learning Theories, Studies on New Technologies and Practices in Education, comparing it with the interesting discoveries that emerge from recent neuroscientific research. It seems necessary to recall the responsibility of accompanying childhood on the roads of complexity in GLocal citizenship and, so, to offer children the tools and times for developing the capacity to think critically, to reason around events, and to undertake constructive relations with the environment and with others. With the present research, which has engaged me in different forms for three richly intense years, I have tried to centre my analysis on the exercise of thought as an indispensable educational responsibility to which the devices of the Montessori Method and of the Philosophy for Children can contribute.]

Language: Italian

Published: Bologna, Italy, 2018

Book Section

A Study in Personality: Montessori and George, Naumburg, Parkhurst and Pyle

Available from: Springer Link

Book Title: America's Early Montessorians: Anne George, Margaret Naumburg, Helen Parkhurst and Adelia Pyle

Pages: 59-68

Adelia Pyle - Biographic sources, Americas, Anne E. George - Biographic sources, Helen Parkhurst - Biographic sources, Margaret Naumburg - Biographic sources, Montessori method of education - History, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This chapter analyzes the personal interactions of the principal characters—George, Naumburg, Parkhurst and Pyle—and an over-powering fifth woman, Maria Montessori. The analysis of the interplay, the personal relationships, and the tensions between these principals, is integrated with the institutional history of educational organizations, schools, and events. George, Naumburg, Parkhurst, and Pyle arrived at the Montessori training courses believing their instructor, the greatest educator in the world, was truly “an educational wonder worker.” A complex multidimensional person, Montessori, determined to control what she had created, expected total loyalty, almost fealty and submission, from her trainees. Montessori’s demanding personality caused tension with her four students that affected the establishment of her method in the United States.

Language: English

Published: Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020

ISBN: 978-3-030-54835-3

Series: Historical Studies in Education

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Montessori Philosophy is a Good Foundation to Education of New Generation

Available from: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)

Publication: ILIRIA International Review, vol. 8, no. 2

Pages: 227-238

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of the paper is to present the philosophy of reform of education in Albania during the post-communist transition. Reforming education is a priority, but has been neglected by governments over the last 25 years. Over the last five years, the new curriculum and the new textbook system are being implemented according to the European standards. The core of reform is "have human beings learnt" (E. Ultarur, 2012). The constructivist philosophy of learning is a sure foundation that guarantees the new quality of the educational process. The Montessori's philosophy guarantees high quality and safety for the future because: First, this philosophy serves as a theoretical basis and serves as a method. Montessori has discovered the stages of natural development of the thinking human beings from childhood to adolescence, basing on scientific evidence, from childhood to adolescence. Secondly, Montessori’s constructivism moved the knowledge from the product into the process. Montessori illuminates the way of building human values during educational teaching process at school and in the community by the falling down of the classic wall that separates school from the community (public). Our research is based on the study of curricular experiences and on data from consultations with students, parents and specialists. The search method is holistic. By the holistic education the children need not only to develop academically, but to develop the ability as well in order to survive in the real world. The real world in our era is in front of the virtual world. In this contexts, we must teach children to learn not what?, but how? (How does it work/learn?). The teacher must learn his/her students how they construct the values by their immediate relationships with their friends and family as well as social development, health, and intellectual development.

Language: English

DOI: 10.21113/iir.v8i2.447

ISSN: 2365-8592, 2192-7081

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Maria Montessori’s Philosophy of Experimental Psychology

Available from: The University of Chicago Press Journals

Publication: HOPOS: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science, vol. 5, no. 2

Pages: 240-268

Maria Montessori - Philosophy

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Abstract/Notes: Through philosophical analysis of Montessori’s critiques of psychology, I aim to show the enduring relevance of those critiques. Maria Montessori sees experimental psychology as fundamental to philosophy and pedagogy, but she objects to the experimental psychology of her day in four ways: as disconnected from practice, as myopic, as based excessively on methods from physical sciences, and—most fundamentally—as offering detailed examinations of human beings (particularly children) under abnormal conditions. In place of these prevailing norms, Montessori suggests a model of the teacher-scientist in a specially prepared environment, who can engage in sustained and impassioned observation of “normalized” children. Drawing from a variety of texts and recently published lectures, this article lays out Montessori’s philosophy of experimental psychology and briefly discusses its relevance today.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1086/682395

ISSN: 2152-5188

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