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Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Rewriting Wundtian Psychology: Luigi Credaro and the Psychology in Rome

Available from: APA PsycNet

Publication: History of Psychology

Europe, Italy, Luigi Credaro - Biographic sources, Luigi Credaro - Philosophy, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Sante de Sanctis - Biographic sources, Sante de Sanctis - Philosophy, Southern Europe, Wilhelm Wundt - Biographic sources, Wilhelm Wundt - Philosophy

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Abstract/Notes: After Rome became the capital of Italy in 1871, prestigious scientists arrived at the University of Rome. One of these scholars was the pedagogical philosopher Luigi Credaro (1860-1939). He was one of the rare Italian students of Wilhelm Wundt (1832-1920) when he went to Leipzig and attended the Institute for Experimental Psychology in the academic year 1887-1888. There he also followed the pedagogical seminars and considered the usefulness of establishing sections of practical pedagogy in Italian magisterium schools, which were teacher-training institutions. In 1904, he founded in Rome the Scuola Pedagogica (Pedagogical School). Through the school, Credaro proposed the concept of a scientific pedagogy based on the application of the results of experimental sciences in the educational field. We can suppose that this approach influenced the first generation of Italian scholars interested in experimental psychology in Rome, in particular Sante De Sanctis (1862-1935) and Maria Montessori (1870-1952). The article thus considers the hypothesis of the formation of a so-called Roman school of psychology, which created in the field of pedagogy a ground on which to develop its research and applications. It should be noted that Credaro devoted himself to the potential applications of experimental psychology in the context of the modernization of the liberal states of the 20th century. Specifically, scientific pedagogy constituted a field of application and development for Roman psychology. At the end, the foundation of psychology in Rome was influenced by a particular version of the Wundtian psychology promoted by his pupil Credaro.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1037/hop0000219

ISSN: 1939-0610, 1093-4510

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effect of Student-Led Conferencing at School and at Home on Goal-Setting, Goal-Fulfillment, Effort, Achievement, Intrinsic Motivation, and Satisfaction for Montessori Lower Elementary 3rd Year Students.

Available from: St. Catherine University

Academic achievement, Action research, Americas, Goal setting, Lower elementary, Montessori method of education, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This study was designed to determine the effect of weekly student-led conferences (both at-home and at-school) on goal setting, goal fulfillment, effort, achievement, intrinsic motivation, and satisfaction. One teacher, eight Montessori third-year lower elementary students, and eight parents participated in the study for six weeks. Baseline data on goal setting and fulfillment was collected and analyzed. Guiding questions designed to encourage and support the students formed the content of the conferences. Pre- and post-intervention surveys were administered. The results showed that while the intervention did not help the students set and fulfill greater quantities of goals, it did have a positive effect on the prioritizing of academic and project-based goals. Communication and relationships between parties also increased, resulting in greater adult awareness of student success and challenge, as well as more supportive adult behavior. Continued research could involve a modified home and school conference format for all lower elementary students.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2017

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Goal Setting on Student Work Completion in a Lower Elementary Montessori Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Americas, Goal setting, Montessori method of education, North America, Public Montessori, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This investigation explored if and how direct instruction on goal-setting and working toward a goal over a four-week period impacted the number of activities students independently completed in class. The amount of math and language work completed and the way the participants felt about their ability to manage their time and goals were measured and evaluated. The study took place at a diverse elementary school in the Midwest. The classroom involved is the only Montessori lower elementary classroom in the district. The 26 students were ages 6-9 at the time of the study. Students were taught how to set a goal and work toward that goal. They also planned for challenges and how to overcome those challenges. Students checked in with their teacher and peers daily to reflect and report how focused they were in regards to achieving the goal they set. Students were observed, data was collected about the type and amount of work completed, students were rated by a peer accountability partner daily, and students completed a pre and post-self-assessment about setting goals and how competent they felt in doing so. The results of the study showed that while the amount of work did not increase, students reported feeling more confident in their ability to set goals and use strategies to stay on task and on-task behavior increased. Direct instruction in goal setting enabled students to feel more confident in selecting a goal and working toward it. They gained tools for staying focused during work times. They were able to use these tools to be on task more frequently than before the intervention. Teachers may want to choose to include direct goal setting in their practice. Further studies may want to track data for a longer period of time to see if work output also would increase.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2020

Article

Philosophy, Psychology, and Educational Goals for the Montessori Adolescent, Ages Twelve to Fifteen

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 28, no. 1

Pages: 107-122

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Abstract/Notes: Defines Montessori theory in terms that can interface with developmental psychology, summarizing adolescent cognitive, social, emotional, and moral outcomes. Focuses on outcomes of the third plane of education for youth in an Erdkinder setting, Montessori's "Educational Syllabus," providing clues about the future Montessori adult. Suggests that the emotional dimension of the early adolescent stage might be viewed as the end state for childhood. (Author/KB)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Goal Setting and Choice on Student Motivation

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Americas, Goal (Psychology), Motivation (Psychology), North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this research is to determine what effect weekly conferences and goal setting opportunities have on the motivation of kindergarten children, in a multi-age (3-6 year-old) Montessori early childhood classroom in the Midwest. The goal was for children to become selfmotivated to choose and practice independent work that is developmentally appropriate. Data was collected before, during, and after the project using an observational checklist to determine the effectiveness of implementing goal setting and conferences with students. The research showed that writing goals in a journal was helpful for the majority of students. The students involved in the study came into the classroom ready to choose the lessons that were written in their journal. Also witnessed was an increase in positive talk and encouragement throughout the classroom. The students were reassuring each other and checked on one another to see how close they were to meeting their goals. Future research could be done to determine if goal setting could be carried over into the home and further research into intrinsic motivation of children would be helpful.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2017

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effect of Goal Setting and Student Self-Reflection on Motivation and On Task Behavior in the Upper Elementary Public Montessori Environment

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Americas, Goal (Psychology), North America, Public Montessori, United States of America, Upper elementary

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this action research project was to study the effects of goal-setting and self-reflection on the intrinsic motivation and on task behavior of students in an upper level (ages 9-12) public Montessori classroom. The project used multiple data sources to better understand the impact of goal-setting and self-reflection on student academic achievement, prosocial behavior, and emotional wellbeing. Teacher-made rating scales and self-reflection prompts were used to determine student outlook on completion of their goals while semi-structured student interviews, given at the beginning, middle, and end of the project, gave insight into student perceptions of goal-setting benefits. After analyzing the results of the data, it was found that weekly short term and long range goal-setting can have a positive impact on student achievement, prosocial behavior, and emotional wellbeing.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2018

Doctoral Dissertation

The Developmental Psychology of Maria Montessori (Italy)

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori is historically recognized for her contributions to early education. Her primary recognition derived from the comprehensive educational program which became known as the Montessori Method. Relatively little attention has focused on her background as physician, psychiatrist, and pedagogical psychologist, from which she developed a body of psychological knowledge which established the foundation of the well-known Method. Her pedagogical psychology was overshadowed by her pedagogical theory despite her secure position in the history of child psychiatry. Also contributing to the non-acceptance of Montessori's psychology was the psychological tenor of the times. In the forefront of the psychological movement in the early 1900's were psychometric testing, Freud's psycho-sexual stages, Thorndike's stimulus-response theory, and the emergence of behaviorism under the leadership of Watson, to name a few. This climate was not hospitable to Montessori's developmental-interactionist theory. In the 1960's through the research findings of psychologists and the availability of Federal funds to compensate the "cumulative deficits" of the disadvantaged child, interest was focused on early childhood education and consequently the Montessori Method. As psychologists embraced Piaget's developmental theory, resemblances in thinking between Piaget and Montessori were noted. While psychologists pointed to Montessori's developmental-interactionist ideas, nobody attempted to elaborate her developmental theory in toto. This study attempts to do so. For Montessori, the development of the child takes place in successive and qualitatively different stages, with each stage providing the foundation for succeeding stages. Within this framework, she clearly delineates cognitive, motor, language, socialization, personality, and character as developing through stages. Cognitive structures develop through the child's interaction with, and actions upon, objects in the environment. A thorough examination of her theory leaves no doubt that Montessori is a cognitive developmentalist. While at times she appears nativistic, and at other times an extreme environmentalist, her position on development is interactionist and constructivist. Montessori is historically recognized for her contributions to early education. Her primary recognition derived from the comprehensive educational program which became known as the Montessori Method. Relatively little attention has focused on her background as physician, psychiatrist, and pedagogical psychologist, from which she developed a body of psychological knowledge which established the foundation of the well-known Method. Her pedagogical psychology was overshadowed by her pedagogical theory despite her secure position in the history of child psychiatry. Also contributing to the non-acceptance of Montessori's psychology was the psychological tenor of the times. In the forefront of the psychological movement in the early 1900's were psychometric testing, Freud's psycho-sexual stages, Thorndike's stimulus-response theory, and the emergence of behaviorism under the leadership of Watson, to name a few. This climate was not hospitable to Montessori's developmental-interactionist theory. In the 1960's through the research findings of psychologists and the availability of Federal funds to compensate the "cumulative deficits" of the disadvantaged child, interest was focused on early childhood education and consequently the Montessori Method. As psychologists embraced Piaget's developmental theory, resemblances in thinking between Piaget and Montessori were noted. While psychologists pointed to Montessori's developmental-interactionist ideas, nobody attempted to elaborate her developmental theory in toto. This study attempts to do so. For Montessori, the development of the child takes place in successive and qualitatively different stages, with each stage providing the foundation for succeeding stages. Within this framework, she clearly delineates cognitive, motor, language, socialization, personality, and character as developing through stages. Cognitive structures develop through the child's interaction with, and actions upon, objects in the environment. A thorough examination of her theory leaves no doubt that Montessori is a cognitive developmentalist. While at times she appears nativistic, and at other times an extreme environmentalist, her position on development is interactionist and constructivist. In contemporary terms her "psychopedagogy" would be considered an action psychology, which basically precludes it from academic "respectibility". Her theory contains both strengths and weaknesses in light of present-day thinking; however, on balance, Montessori's theory is quite contemporary and remarkably ahead of most of the psychological thinking of her time.

Language: English

Published: New York, 1982

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

European Roots of the First Psychology Clinic in North America

Available from: Hogrefe

Publication: European Psychologist, vol. 1, no. 1

Pages: 44-50

Americas, Lightner Witmer - Biographic sources, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Lightner Witmer (1867-1956) founded the first psychology clinic in Philadelphia 100 years ago, in March 1896. Even though he was an American, he readily acknowledged some European roots of his work. Witmer earned his Ph.D. at the University of Leipzig, Germany, under Wilhelm Wundt. He was encouraged by his Philadelphia mentor, James McKeen Cattell, to focus on individual differences in the tradition of Francis Galton of England. Witmer modeled his clinical interventions after the previous efforts of J.R. Pereira, J.M.G. Itard, and Edouard Seguin of France and Maria Montessori of Italy. The consequences for modern psychology of Witmer's idea that psychologists should use their knowledge to help people individually were noteworthy. Clinical psychology is today the most common psychology specialty in Europe and, indeed, in much of the world. However, Witmer's concept that clinical psychologists should be trained at the doctoral level is as yet far better accepted in North America than it is elsewhere.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1027/1016-9040.1.1.44

ISSN: 1016-9040, 1878-531X

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Maria Montessori’s Philosophy of Experimental Psychology

Available from: The University of Chicago Press Journals

Publication: HOPOS: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science, vol. 5, no. 2

Pages: 240-268

Maria Montessori - Philosophy

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Abstract/Notes: Through philosophical analysis of Montessori’s critiques of psychology, I aim to show the enduring relevance of those critiques. Maria Montessori sees experimental psychology as fundamental to philosophy and pedagogy, but she objects to the experimental psychology of her day in four ways: as disconnected from practice, as myopic, as based excessively on methods from physical sciences, and—most fundamentally—as offering detailed examinations of human beings (particularly children) under abnormal conditions. In place of these prevailing norms, Montessori suggests a model of the teacher-scientist in a specially prepared environment, who can engage in sustained and impassioned observation of “normalized” children. Drawing from a variety of texts and recently published lectures, this article lays out Montessori’s philosophy of experimental psychology and briefly discusses its relevance today.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1086/682395

ISSN: 2152-5188

Article

Lofty Goals

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 29, no. 3

Pages: 63

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: THE TRUE STORY OF THE YOUNGEST PERSON TO CLIMB THE SEVEN SUMMITS by Jordan Romero with Linda LeBlanc 2015, Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers Paperback, 368 pages No Summit Out of Sight is about Jordan Romero, a young man who set a goal to climb each continent's tallest mountain. At the age of 9, Jordan was inspired by a mural at his school, a simple depiction of nested summits showing the height of the seven continents' highest mountains. In the book, Jordan describes himself as a goal-oriented young person, and so, despite his inexperience with actual mountain climbing, he embarked on a mental and physical training regimen with the goal of climbing his first summit-Mt.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

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