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231 results

Article

The Prepared Adult as the Key to the Montessori Approach for Indigenous Communities of Australia

Available from: AMI Montessori Digital

Publication: Montessori Articles (Montessori Australia Foundation)

Pages: 1-26

Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, Oceania

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Language: English

Article

Montessori and the Indigenous Communities of Australia

Publication: Montessori International, vol. 82

Pages: 18–19

Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, Oceania

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori Children's Foundation

Language: English

Article

The Prepared Adult as the Key to the Montessori Approach for Indigenous Communities of Australia

Publication: Communications of the Association Montessori Internationale (1961-2008), vol. 2006, no. 1

Pages: 21–45

Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, Oceania

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Language: English

ISSN: 1877-539X

Article

The Prepared Adult as the Key to the Montessori Approach for Indigenous Communities of Australia

Publication: Montessori Articles (Montessori Australia Foundation)

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Language: English

Honors Thesis

The Seneca Language and Bilingual Road Signs: A Study in the Sociology of an Indigenous Language

Available from: Ohio State University - Knowledge Bank

Americas, Bilingualism, Indigenous communities, North America, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: One of the fundamental types of human rights concerns collective-developmental rights which allow minorities to use heritage languages and practices without external interference (Vašák 1977). The protected status of minority language rights is a critical part of language revitalization in which speakers of heritage languages, faced with the encroachment of more socially, politically, and economically dominant languages, embark on vigorous programs to ensure the survival and continued usage of their language. The Five Nations Iroquoian language, Seneca, has just a few remaining speech communities and a variety of ongoing language revitalization initiatives (Mithun 2012). To revitalize their traditional language, community classes through the Seneca Language Department and the Faithkeepers Montessori School Seneca Language Nest for young speakers have concentrated their efforts on preserving Onöndowa'ga:' Gawë:nö' the indigenous name for the Seneca language (Bowen 2020, Murray 2015). In the public sphere, a push by the Seneca Nation of Indians Department of Transportation fulfilling the intent of the federal Native American Tourism and Improving Visitor Experience (NATIVE) Act enacted in 2016, specifically included bilingual signs for state roads running through indigenous land in addition to other significant components (Figura 2016). In an area whose geographic names are strongly connected to Iroquoian languages including Seneca, these bilingual signs represent more public and visible Seneca language presence and stand as symbols of language revitalization. The place names and information that appear on the signs have considerable significance for community identity as well as linguistic and economic impacts, among others. Through oral histories collected from Seneca Nation members and language advocates in addition to a representative from the New York State Department of Transportation, this study pursues an analysis of the Seneca public usage of their heritage language and the various language revitalization efforts occurring among indigenous and minority communities internationally. As the COVID-19 pandemic threatens already vulnerable populations, heritage languages that have been historically oppressed face a global language crisis that disproportionately harms and disadvantages speakers of heritage and minority languages (Roche 2020). While the language of road signs may seem mundane, this study reveals how the Seneca bilingual signs play a significant role in awareness of indigenous territory and consequently stimulation of the local economy as well as supporting language learning, revitalization, and de-stigmatization. Primarily through the efforts of the Seneca community, the bilingual signs represent the expression of language rights in the public sphere and one part of the ongoing language revitalization.

Language: English

Published: Columbus, Ohio, 2021

Article

Hawaiian Indigenous Education and the Montessori Approach: Overlapping Pedagogy, Values, and Worldview

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 39, no. 3

Pages: 251-271

Americas, Asian American and Pacific Islander community, Indigenous communities, North America, North America, North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Nanette Schonleber makes a remarkable correlation as to why Hawaiian indigenous educators thrive with Montessori pedagogy. Compatible educators share values and goals, such as developmental learning, respect for parenthood, freedom of movement and independence, choice in learning, and specific individualized potential. Hawaiian language and culture-based educators view their work as a way of learning embedded in a way of life that integrates a cultural worldview and belief system, such as the child as a spiritual being, earth as living, and creation as interconnected. The author also finds congruency in land-based learning as being fundamental to indigenous learning and similar to the Erdkinder emphasis for the adolescent where interconnectedness and community roles arise out of farming. [This article is based on the author's 2006 award-winning doctoral dissertation titled "Culturally Congruent Education and the Montessori Model: Perspectives from Hawaiian Culture-Based Educators."]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Democratic Classroom Communities

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: Studies in Philosophy and Education, vol. 15, no. 4

Pages: 333-351

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Abstract/Notes: I explore democractic communities using the classroom community as a metaphor. I suggest that democracies do justice to individuals as well as groups, because of the democratic focus on the interconnected, interdependent, interactive relationship that exists between selves and communities. However, the concept of ‘community’ has problems and contradictions as well. Through the examples of Summerhill and Montessori schools it is easier to see a necessary quality of democratic communities that needs highlighting. That quality is caring. Making the connection between democracy and caring is what this article uniquely offers to the lively discussion on communities and selves.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/BF00368491

ISSN: 1573-191X, 0039-3746

Article

Care Givers’ Knowledge of Integrating the Montessori; Indigenous Communicative Teaching Methods and Reggio Emilia in Early Child Care Education

Available from: African Journals Online

Publication: AFRREV IJAH: An International Journal of Arts and Humanities, vol. 6, no. 3

Pages: 127-140

Africa, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, Sub-Saharan Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, West Africa

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Abstract/Notes: Studies have identified the mismatch between theory and practice as the main reason for gap between the intended and the achieved curriculum objectives. The early childcare education is no exception. Theories of child development emphasize that children learn best through play and self-discovery. Unfortunately, research results revealed that caregivers do not adhere to the prescribed pedagogy and since pedagogy stems from the theory of the nature of the learner and how he learns; it implies that failure to use the right pedagogy adversely affects the achievement of the objectives. The study therefore sought to identify caregivers’ knowledge of integrating Montessori, Indigenous Communicative Teaching and Reggio Emilia approaches in Early Childhood Care Education in Owerri Educational zone, Imo State, Nigeria. The study is a descriptive survey with the population comprising all caregivers in government approved pre-primary schools totalling 119, using a 39-item questionnaire and percentages as well as chi square for data analyses. Results showed that respondents were not knowledgeable. Recommendations include the need to monitor caregivers to ensure compliance to stipulated policy.Keywords: childcare education, caregivers

Language: English

DOI: 10.4314/ijah.v6i3.11

ISSN: 2227-5452

Article

Using the Cosmic Curriculum of Dr. Montessori Toward the Development of a Place-Based Indigenous Science Program

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 7, no. 2

Cosmic education, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples

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Abstract/Notes: Indigenous educators desire to use culturally restorative and decolonized pedagogies reflective of their own cultural values and beliefs in their science programs but have lacked models for how to start. They also often lack confidence in their ability to teach the sciences. This three-year qualitative case study used grounded theory methodology to discover (a) how Hawaiian language immersion (HLC) K–6 educators used Maria Montessori’s Cosmic Curriculum for the creation of a science program based on Hawaiian epistemology and cultural values and (b) why the Cosmic Curriculum appealed to the HLC educators. Five key themes emerged: (a) the notion of creation as interconnected and relational, (b) an epistemological similarity regarding how people learn, (c) using timelines as organizing cognitive structures, (d) a focus on the natural sciences, and (e) the use of storytelling and key lessons to engage students. Participants stated that they felt successful in creating science curriculum and teaching the sciences as they adapted the above aspects of Dr. Montessori’s Cosmic Curriculum. Future research should be conducted to discover if her Cosmic Curriculum can be adapted for use in other types of non-Montessori program and whether this kind of science program could encourage students to choose the sciences as a career choice.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v7i2.15763

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

Innovative Montessori Practice in an Australian Indigenous Community School Linking Migalu Zoology and Murri Zoology

Publication: The Alcove: Newsletter of the Australian AMI Alumni Association, no. 15

Pages: 23–25

Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, Kamilaroi (Australian people), Montessori method of education, Oceania, Zoology education

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Abstract/Notes: Migalu or Migaloo is an Aboriginal Australian term for "a white person". Murri is the name of a specific group of Aboriginal Australian peoples (also known as Kamilaroi) which form one of the four largest Indigenous nations in Australia.

Language: English

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