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Doctoral Dissertation

Comparison of the Application of Maria Montessori's Language Arts Ideas and Practices in Two Periods of Development in the United States: 1909-1921 and 1953-1963

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Americas, Classroom environment, Montessori materials, Montessori method of education - Teachers, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Maria Montessori's work is intimately grounded in her detailed teaching practices and the logic of their sequence, along with their underlying ideas and values, particularly in the area of language arts. There are no studies, however, which comprehensively analyze her language arts curriculum for children from three to seven as it was applied by the practitioners who fostered, interpreted, and promoted her work in America in periods of its popularity: 1909-1921 and 1953-1963. This lack of comprehensive analysis blurs the fundamental identity and contextual coherence of Montessori's work and obscures the significant and ongoing contribution made to American education through her language arts curriculum. An analysis of Montessori's published work and those written about her was made in order to achieve a description of her language arts curriculum for the purpose of comparing her work to that of her American sponsors. To determine how Montessori's curriculum was interpreted and applied, the literature on the history of the Montessori movement was reviewed and five leaders were identified: Ann George, Alexander Graham Bell, Clara Craig, Helen Parkhurst, and Nancy McCormick Rambusch. Their writings and other primary sources were analyzed with reference to Montessori's curriculum. In some cases interviews were conducted and Montessori classrooms were observed over an extended period of time. The analysis of the activity of the leaders, within their contemporary social and educational settings revealed how Montessori's curriculum became detached from her original experimental context and was reshaped because of lack of understanding or of agreement with the systematic purpose of her educational material in the development of language arts skills, and because of varying intentions and views on how and what children should learn. The findings of the study also contribute to existing studies on the reasons for the decline of Montessori's practices by the end of the first period, and for success in the revival of her work in the second period. In addition, conclusions contribute to the unified body of knowledge needed to thoroughly identify the Montessori educational model practiced and researched by educators.

Language: English

Published: Durham, North Carolina, 1984

Doctoral Dissertation

The Effects of High-Stakes Testing on Secondary Language Arts Curriculum and Instruction

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: High-stakes testing has become mandatory since the reauthorization of the Elementary Secondary Educational Act, 2001 with its No Child Left Behind (NCLB) provisions. Beginning with the 2005-06 school year, students in grades K-8 must be tested yearly in reading and math. Students in secondary schools must be tested once in reading and math. Student scores at all grade levels are then used as part of the formula for determining whether or not a school retains its accreditation or is placed on a "needs improvement" list. Being identified as "needs improvement" for three consecutive years carries an assortment of serious consequences for schools. As a result of these high-stakes tests, secondary language arts teachers are expected to prepare students for state reading assessments. Studies have investigated the effects high-stakes testing has on elementary and secondary curriculum and instruction but have not focused specifically on secondary language arts teachers. Therefore, this study focuses on the effects high-stakes testing is having on secondary language arts' curriculum and instruction. Six high school junior English teachers from a Midwestern state were surveyed and interviewed. Five of the teachers also participated in a focus group discussion. From this data several common themes emerged including a narrowing of their curricula and a loss of instructional time to test preparation and the actual administration of the tests. In addition, teachers expressed feelings of inadequacy about their knowledge of effective pedagogy for improving adolescent reading skills. From this study it becomes clear that secondary language arts teachers need more information on best practices for working with adolescents and improving adolescent reading skills while incorporating the state reading standards and maintaining a meaningful curriculum and engaging instructional strategies. Administrators and state departments of education need to consider ways to provide useful in-services on reading for secondary teachers. In addition, university teacher education programs need to prepare future teachers and offer teachers who are currently in the classroom assistance in developing effective strategies for teaching reading skills to adolescents which will keep the students engaged.

Language: English

Published: Lawrence, Kansas, 2005

Article

What Are the Language Arts For?

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 18, no. 2

Pages: 123-132

Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Elementary education, Language acquisition, Language arts, Montessori method of education, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Depicts the isolation which results when education, particularly language arts education, is concerned primarily with the acquisition of skills. Urges educators not to lose sight of the fundamental purpose of the language arts, which are to help people make and articulate meaning from their experiences, to empower people, and to imagine alternative possibilities for themselves. (HTH)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Differentiating Language Arts in Belize

Available from: ERIC

Publication: Forum on Public Policy, vol. 5, no. 1

Pages: 14 p.

Americas, Belize, Central America, Language arts, Latin America and the Caribbean, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - History, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: There is limited amount of research that constitutes non-traditional curricula implemented within an institutionalized context of developing countries. An attempt is made in this project to gain a clearer understanding of a non-traditional early learning program within an orphanage campus setting of Ladyville, Belize, Central America. This program is supported through the Belizean Ministry of Education and the University of Belize. In 1996, a comprehensive literacy survey was conducted in Belize that indicated the functional literacy rate to be approximately 40 percent (Cornerstone, 2007). In addition, it is estimated within developing countries one person in four is illiterate (Terryn, 2006). Liberty Learning Centre (LLC) of Ladyville, Belize implemented non-traditional theoretical curricula reflecting the social-constructivist theory to early learning. The methodologies include: Pikler, Montessori and components of the Reggio Emilia philosophy. The staff of LLC discovered creative, innovative and strategic ways to differentiate traditional academic learning through a diverse non-traditional learning environment. Procedures: Responses from the administration, caregivers, teachers, staff and students were interpreted and documented through various means of audio/DVD/video recordings, photography, interviews and journals. In addition I used detailed anecdotal field notes that became pieces to the methodology for the project. Findings: Responses, thoughts, ideas and viewpoints were given by the administration, teachers, students and staff regarding the implementation of non-traditional curricula within an institutionalized and non-traditional learning environment of a developing country. Implication: An institutionalized and international socio-cultural perspective will extend early childhood education further through a qualitative ethnographic study in Belize. This project gives voice to the silent and voiceless.

Language: English

ISSN: 1556-763X, 1938-9809

Comparison of the application of Maria Montessori's language arts ideas and practices in two periods of development in the United States, 1909-1921 and 1953-1963

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Language: English

Published: Durham, North Carolina, 1984

Book

Teaching Preschool Language Arts

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Language: English

Published: Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University Press, 1982

ISBN: 0-8425-1933-5

Article

Montessori Language Arts at Home, Part 2

Publication: Practical Homeschooling, no. 52

Pages: 35-

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Language: English

ISSN: 1075-4741

Article

Montessori Language Arts, Part 1 [Montessori at Home]

Publication: Practical Homeschooling

Pages: 35

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Language: English

ISSN: 1075-4741

Book Section

The Teaching of Reading and Language Arts in the Montessori School

Available from: ERIC

Book Title: Implementing Montessori Education in the Public Sector

Pages: 144-156

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Language: English

Published: Cleveland, OH: North American Montessori Teachers' Association, 1990

Article

A Language Arts Program for Pre-First-Grade Children: Two-Year Achievement Report

Publication: American Montessori Society Bulletin, vol. 9, no. 4

Pages: 1-32

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 0277-9064

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