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153 results

Article

Embedding Literacy in an Early Childhood Education Programme: A Look into Montessori

Available from: InformIT

Publication: New Zealand Research in Early Childhood Education, vol. 15

Pages: 11-30

Australasia, Australia and New Zealand, Literacy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - Evaluation, New Zealand, Oceania

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Abstract/Notes: Children begin school with a range of pre-literacy skills that serve as the foundation for later reading achievement. These skills include phonological awareness, alphabet knowledge and vocabulary. The New Zealand early childhood curriculum Te Whariki is non-prescriptive in terms of literacy and allows for early childhood centres to develop their own literacy programmes with varying levels of emphasis on pre-literacy skills. This article describes research into the pre-literacy skills and knowledge of 23 children between the ages of 4.6 and 4.11 months attending two Montessori centres in New Zealand where the Head Teachers are Montessori trained and the centres use traditional Montessori resources and materials to develop literacy. The researcher investigated the efficacy of a Montessori approach to the development of literacy skills in four year olds in the context of current research around pre-literacy skills development in early childhood education.

Language: English

ISSN: 1174-6122

Doctoral Dissertation

Literacy Outcomes of Montessori-Trained Students Under Alternative Instructional Conditions

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of the study was to investigate differences in literacy outcomes of Montessori-trained students under alternative instructional conditions in first grade. As a method of instruction, Montessori has not been adequately researched in the area of literacy to verify its efficacy in educating students. Previous studies compared Montessori students to non-Montessori students; therefore, the findings were open to the criticism that private school students enjoyed an a priori advantage over their public school counterparts. In this study, all participants had Montessori preschool experience. Roughly half the subjects chose public school and half chose to continue at Montessori for first grade. Sociofunctional linguistics, educational psychology, and Montessori's writing on education provided theoretical underpinnings for the study. A mixed research design was employed. Qualitative observations were conducted over a period of a calendar year. Quantitative measures were taken in a pretest/posttest format on five different literacy measures. Qualitative results show the core theme of the classroom was child-centeredness. This assertion was supported by five separate categories that emerged from observation. Quantitative results indicate that Montessori-trained students in alternative instructional conditions fared better on literacy measures than their counterparts who remained at Montessori for first grade. These results, along with methodological innovations for using literate register cohesion and genre analysis in literacy research, contribute to the educational research base in literacy studies.

Language: English

Published: West Lafayette, Indiana, 2005

Article

Shakespeare and Literacy: A Case Study in a Primary Classroom

Available from: Science Publications PTY LTD

Publication: Journal of Social Sciences, vol. 8, no. 2

Pages: 170-176

Americas, Canada, Literacy, Montessori method of education, North America

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Abstract/Notes: Problem statement: Childhood is an integral time for literacy development and the aim of this article is to closely examine what pedagogical strategies were most effective to promote literacy learning with a group of six to nine year old children. This case study investigates how the use of specific literacy and drama-based strategies prepared and stimulated young children’s understanding and appreciation of a Shakespeare play. Approach: The study was conducted over a period of three months in a multi-age Montessori primary classroom in Vancouver, Canada. Over 600 writing samples from the class of 22 children were analyzed. Eight classroom observations by the author and another researcher were documented, using field notes, still photo images and video. Interviews with the teacher, parents and children were undertaken and two years after the study, a focus group was conducted with eight of the original children who had participated in the initial research. Using a qualitative research approach, the data was analyzed in search of recurring patterns and themes that highlighted literacy strategies where children’s understanding and engagement with Shakespeare was most effective. Results and Conclusion: It was observed that five particular writing and drawing strategies (word wall, journal, character masks, letters and newspaper) allowed the children to develop a greater understanding and appreciation of Shakespeare’s work. The above literacy strategies fostered vocabulary development, understanding of plot and character motivations and the ability for the children to rehearse and perform the Shakespeare play for their peers and family. Member checking with a randomly selected group of children two years later and written feedback from parents confirmed key learning outcomes that occurred during the study.

Language: English

DOI: 10.3844/jssp.2012.170.176

ISSN: 2616-4515

Article

H is for Hurricane, M is for Maria: Supporting literacy in Vieques

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: Journal of Early Childhood Literacy

Pages: Article 14687984211044196

Americas, Caribbean, Latin America and the Caribbean, Latino community, Public Montessori, Puerto Rico

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Abstract/Notes: The case study, H is For Hurricane and M is For Maria explores the public Montessori System of Puerto Rico as an educational philosophy of resilience. The authors present a counternarrative to early literacy development on the island by focusing in on two public Montessori schools from Vieques, Puerto Rico. The study was conducted one year after the passing of Hurricane Maria. Data collected, highlights the strong effectiveness of combining children’s home life experiences together with foundational early literacy development. Through this piece, teachers and parents share how they teach early literacy by making the absolute most of what surrounds them physically and culturally. Puerto Rico is poorer than the poorest state yet has had the fastest growth of public Montessori schools, than anywhere else in the United States. Major conclusions state that access to public Montessori education in Puerto Rico offers children an advantage in early literacy development.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/14687984211044196

ISSN: 1468-7984

Article

Literacy in Early Childhood Settings in New Zealand: An Examination of Teachers' Beliefs and Practices

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: Australasian Journal of Early Childhood, vol. 31, no. 2

Pages: 31-41

Australasia, Australia and New Zealand, Literacy, New Zealand, Oceania, Perceptions

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Abstract/Notes: Recent research indicates that children develop the emergent knowledge and skills that lead to formal literacies in their homes and early childhood settings long before school entry. The research evidence is clear that emergent literacy needs to be actively encouraged in the early years, if children are to have optimum chances of learning to read at school. In New Zealand, there are only a few studies of how literacy is promoted and practised in early childhood settings. This paper examines how 107 teachers in a range of early childhood settings believe that they promote literacy and their reflections on the ways in which Te Whāriki (the national curriculum) influences that practice. The implications for promoting literacy in early childhood settings are explored.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/183693910603100206

ISSN: 1836-9391, 1839-5961

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Literacy Approaches in Montessori 3-6: An Action Research Project

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this research study was to examine connections between the early introduction of Montessori phonograms and increased student-led writing with the Movable Alphabet. This paper discusses the politics of literacy instruction and common literacy approaches used in Montessori early childhood settings, and examines best literacy practices for early childhood students. The study gathered data from Montessori early childhood educators and 19 students in a Montessori early childhood classroom. The classroom data was collected over four weeks, introducing phonograms alongside individual Sandpaper Letters. Children were then given the choice between using objects to guide their writing with the Movable Alphabet and writing their own words without object prompts. The findings indicate that when given the choice, children choose to write their own words. Based on the conclusions from this study, the Montessori education community could benefit from further study on literacy instruction and high-fidelity Montessori practice.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, MN, 2020

Master's Thesis

Literacy Engagement and the Impacts on Literacy Development

Available from: MINDS@UW River Falls

Attention in children, Literacy, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: The most common reason for a person to partake in reading and writing is enjoyment which also provides intrinsic motivation. Students who have intrinsic motivation are more likely to be engaged and interact deeply in the literacy activity, which has shown to increase comprehension and higher reading achievement. Intrinsic motivation and engagement are vital in creating life-long readers and writers. Engaged literacy activities are both a goal of instruction and a pathway to achieve success. The purpose of this research project was to study the effects of engagement strategies and the use of social justice literature on literacy development. This study took place at a public Montessori school located in the Midwest. There was a total of twelve students which consisted of first and second graders aged six through eight years old. Over the span of the twelve-week study, the engagement strategies of experiential learning, interactive read-aloud, and interactive writing were implemented. Student behaviors, knowledge, and skills were assessed to place students on the Reading Developmental Continuum through observation and miscue analysis before and after the strategies were implemented to determine literacy growth in engagement, comprehension, and language-to-print connections. The results indicated growth in all three reading components. It also revealed an increase in students’ social justice awareness and sense of agency. This suggests that engagement strategies rooted in rich meaningful literature positively impact students’ literacy development.

Language: English

Published: River Falls, Wisconsin, 2021

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Mathematical Literacy: The Effects of Mathematics Journals on Student Understanding of Fractions in a Montessori Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Upper elementary

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Abstract/Notes: It is a typical Monday morning. As students enter the classroom wearing brightly colored polo shirts embroidered with the school logo, their smiles are equally bright. This Title I public school in the heart of the city where 96% of the students qualify for free or reduced lunch has recently opened a Montessori option. Walking into the classroom, one 5th grade student eagerly asks, “Who’s on the bread committee this week?” Baking bread is a weekly occurrence in the upper elementary (4th – 6th grade) Montessori classroom. During the first week of school, this same student vehemently threw materials to the floor declaring, “I HATE fractions!” In an effort to positively engage students in mathematics, the weekly bread-making tradition was implemented. Through cooking, students experience the importance of fractions in everyday life. Each week, two students work together, read several recipes, select one, and submit a precise written list of needed ingredients. The next day, with the aid of a bread machine bought for $10 at the local thrift store, the students work together to follow directions, read fractions, measure ingredients, and bake bread. Once baked, students divide the bread into equal portions and serve. After several months of this routine, some recipes will need to be doubled or halved, and on it goes… The bread committee provides a “hook” for some resistant students. It is also a practical application of the role of literacy in mathematics. The choice to focus on mathematical literacy and the effect of journaling on student understanding was influenced by research around mathematical vocabulary as well as the instructional practices of noted educators and researchers. The rigor of upper elementary math as defined in the common core requires students to not only perform calculations with accuracy, but to demonstrate strong reading comprehension through the interpretation of real-world word problems, and to articulate an understanding of MATHEMATICAL LITERACY 3 mathematical reasoning through clear and concise writing. Achieving grade level proficiency has practical life implications for students because research showed mathematical knowledge during elementary school as a strong predictor of financial stability in adulthood, and understanding fractions in fifth grade as a predictor of overall achievement in mathematics (Siegler & Lortie-Forgues, 2015).

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2019

Article

A Literacy Worth Having

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 20, no. 2

Pages: 187-193

Rexford Brown - Writings, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Discusses the literacy program of a charter school in Denver, Colorado, which focuses on the basic literacy of reading and writing spoken, computer, and mathematical languages, along with the languages of music, dance, and the visual arts. The curriculum also emphasizes higher-level scientific, civic, and cultural literacy.

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Portraits of Exemplary Montessori Practice for All Literacy Teachers

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: Early Childhood Education Journal, vol. 31, no. 2

Pages: 127-131

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Abstract/Notes: This article describes children's literacy development across early program levels in a highly respected Montessori school. A qualitative investigation of children's use of language as a holistic process within meaningful contexts was conducted. Descriptions captured children's experiences in a Montessori prepared environment with specifically designed didactic materials, as well as with other non-Montessori language arts resources commonly found in traditional classrooms. The results showed an enriched literacy environment where children from infancy through kindergarten came to understand the important relationships between thought and literacy learnings

Language: English

DOI: 10.1023/B:ECEJ.0000005312.48974.0a

ISSN: 1082-3301, 1573-1707

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