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257 results

Article

Convergence and Divergence of Ethnomathematics (D'Ambrosio) and Mathematics (Montessori): An Ethnomathematics Program

Publication: Montessori Australia eArticle, vol. 2021, no. 4

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Language: English

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Montessori Education's Impact on Academic and Nonacademic Outcomes: A Systematic Review

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: Campbell Systematic Reviews, vol. 19, no. 3

Pages: e1330

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Abstract/Notes: BACKGROUND: Montessori education is the oldest and most widely implemented alternative education in the world, yet its effectiveness has not been clearly established. OBJECTIVES: The primary objective of this review was to examine the effectiveness of Montessori education in improving academic and nonacademic outcomes compared to traditional education. The secondary objectives were to determine the degree to which grade level, Montessori setting (public Montessori vs. private Montessori), random assignment, treatment duration, and length of follow-up measurements moderate the magnitude of Montessori effects. SEARCH METHODS: We searched for relevant studies in 19 academic databases, in a variety of sources known to publish gray literature, in Montessori-related journals, and in the references of studies retrieved through these searches. Our search included studies published during or before February 2020. The initial search was performed in March 2014 with a follow-up search in February 2020. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included articles that compared Montessori education to traditional education, contributed at least one effect size to an academic or nonacademic outcome, provided sufficient data to compute an effect size and its variance, and showed sufficient evidence of baseline equivalency-through random assignment or statistical adjustment-of Montessori and traditional education groups. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: To synthesize the data, we used a cluster-robust variance estimation procedure, which takes into account statistical dependencies in the data. Otherwise, we used standard methodological procedures as specified in the Campbell Collaboration reporting and conduct standards. MAIN RESULTS: Initial searches yielded 2012 articles, of which 173 were considered in detail to determine whether they met inclusion/exclusion criteria. Of these, 141 were excluded and 32 were included. These 32 studies yielded 204 effect sizes (113 academic and 91 nonacademic) across 132,249 data points. In the 32 studies that met minimum standards for inclusion, including evidence of baseline equivalence, there was evidence that Montessori education outperformed traditional education on a wide variety of academic and nonacademic outcomes. For academic outcomes, Hedges' g effect sizes, where positive values favor Montessori, ranged from 0.26 for general academic ability (with high quality evidence) to 0.06 for social studies. The quality of evidence for language (g = 0.17) and mathematics (g = 0.22) was also high. The effect size for a composite of all academic outcomes was 0.24. Science was the only academic outcome that was deemed to have low quality of evidence according to the GRADE approach. Effect sizes for nonacademic outcomes ranged from 0.41 for students' inner experience of school to 0.23 for social skills. Both of these outcomes were deemed as having low quality of evidence. Executive function (g = 0.36) and creativity (g = 0.26) had moderate quality of evidence. The effect size for a composite of all nonacademic outcomes was 0.33. Moderator analyses of the composite academic and nonacademic outcomes showed that Montessori education resulted in larger effect sizes for randomized studies compared to nonrandomized studies, for preschool and elementary settings compared to middle school or high school settings, and for private Montessori compared to public Montessori. Moderator analyses for treatment duration and duration from intervention to follow-up data collection were inconclusive. There was some evidence for a lack of small sample-size studies in favor of traditional education, which could be an indicator of publication bias. However, a sensitivity analysis indicated that the findings in favor of Montessori education were nonetheless robust. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Montessori education has a meaningful and positive impact on child outcomes, both academic and nonacademic, relative to outcomes seen when using traditional educational methods.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1002/cl2.1330

ISSN: 1891-1803

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Academic Achievement Outcomes: A Comparison of Montessori and Non-Montessori Public Elementary School Students

Available from: Journal of Elementary Education

Publication: Journal of Elementary Education, vol. 25, no. 1

Pages: 39-53

Americas, Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Within the realm of elementary public schools, several pedagogical models of early childhood education are practiced in the United States (Lillard, 2005). The constructivist approach to early childhood education is illustrative of best practices based on current theory. One model of constructivist early childhood education is the Montessori Method founded in the early twentieth century by Maria Montessori, an Italian physician (Montessori, 1912/1964). Though the Montessori Method is aligned with research-based best practices espoused by constructivism, there are relatively few public Montessori schools currently in the United States. A direct comparison is needed between the academic outcomes of public elementary school programs which implement the Montessori Method and those which implement a more traditional approach to early childhood education. The focus of this study is the academic achievement outcomes of Montessori public school students as compared to similar non-Montessori students. The Montessori students’ Iowa Tests of Basic Skills (ITBS) Total Reading and Total Math scores in grades one and two were not statistically different than their non-Montessori counterparts. In grade three, the Montessori students’ Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) Reading and Math scores were not statistically different than those of the non-Montessori students. In grades four and five, the TAKS Reading and Math scores statistically favored Montessori students.

Language: English

ISSN: 2227-1090, 1991-8100

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Working Memory and Executive Functions: Effects of Training on Academic Achievement

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: Psychological Research, vol. 78, no. 6

Pages: 852-868

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Abstract/Notes: The aim of this review is to illustrate the role of working memory and executive functions for scholastic achievement as an introduction to the question of whether and how working memory and executive control training may improve academic abilities. The review of current research showed limited but converging evidence for positive effects of process-based complex working-memory training on academic abilities, particularly in the domain of reading. These benefits occurred in children suffering from cognitive and academic deficits as well as in healthy students. Transfer of training to mathematical abilities seemed to be very limited and to depend on the training regime and the characteristics of the study sample. A core issue in training research is whether high- or low-achieving children benefit more from cognitive training. Individual differences in terms of training-related benefits suggested that process-based working memory and executive control training often induced compensation effects with larger benefits in low performing individuals. Finally, we discuss the effects of process-based training in relation to other types of interventions aimed at improving academic achievement.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s00426-013-0537-1

ISSN: 0340-0727

Conference Paper

The Effects of Kentucky's Primary Program on Three Measures of Academic Achievement

Available from: ERIC

Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (Seattle, Washington, April 10-14, 2001)

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Abstract/Notes: In Kentucky, nongraded primary education became a reality under the mandate of the Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA) in 1990. Research has produced some anecdotal information on the degree to which schools have implemented the ungraded primary program, but there has been no research to link the implementation of the primary program to student achievement or school improvement. Under the regulations growing from the KERA, schools devised different organizational arrangements for the ungraded classrooms, characterized by developmentally appropriate practices and multi-age, multi-ability classrooms. The variance in how students were configured in the multi-age classrooms continued to be a source of conflict and discussion regarding the nongraded primary school program. This study examined the relationship, if any, between the degree of implementation of the primary program and three measures of student achievement: (1) the Kentucky Instructional Results Information System (KIRIS)

Language: English

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Comparison of Impact of Montessori Method of Teaching and Conventional Method of Teaching on Academic Achievements of Primary School Pupils in Enugu East Local Government Area

Available from: Institute of Advance Scholars (IAS)

Publication: Advance Journal of Education and Social Sciences, vol. 4, no. 11

Pages: 20-33

Academic achievement, Africa, Comparative education, Nigeria, Primary education, Primary school students, Sub-Saharan Africa, West Africa

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Abstract/Notes: The study examined the impact of Montessori method and conventional method of teaching on the academic achievement of primary school pupils in Enugu East LGA, Enugu State, Nigeria. The design of the study is ex-post facto. Eighty six (86) pupils from primaries 5, 4, 3 and 2 from each school were sampled from a population of 419 pupils. Three research questions and three null hypothesis guided the study. Instrument for data collection was state uniformed examination questions (SUEQ). The data were analyzed using frequency distribution and tables were analyzed using frequency distribution tables and percentages as well as bar charts to answer the research questions while analysis of variance one-way ANOVA was used at 0.05 level of significance to  test the null hypothesis. The result of the analysis showed that Montessori method of teaching has a greater impact on the academic achievement of pupils than the conventional method. Gender was no significant factor in pupils performed creditably. The study recommended that Montessori’s method of teaching allows experiential learning in a conducive environment and asuch Government school should set up Montessori schools in the state. Teachers should be exposed to seminar and workshops on the use of Montessori’s method of teaching in state schools.

Language: English

ISSN: 2237-1470, 2344-2492

Master's Thesis (M.S.)

Academic Achievement Outcomes: Montessori and Non-Montessori Public Elementary Students

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

Academic achievement, Americas, Comparative education, Early childhood care and education, Elementary education, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Public Montessori, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Within the realm of elementary public schools, several pedagogical models of early childhood education are practiced in the United States (Lillard, 2007). The constructivist approach to early childhood education is illustrative of best practices based on current theory. One model of constructivist early childhood education is the Montessori Method founded in the early twentieth century by Maria Montessori, an Italian physician (Montessori, 1912/1964). Though the Montessori Method is aligned with research-based best practices espoused by constructivism, there are relatively few public Montessori schools currently in the United States. A direct comparison is needed between the academic outcomes of public elementary school programs which implement the Montessori Method and those which implement a more traditional approach to early childhood education. The focus of this study is the academic achievement outcomes of Montessori public school students as compared to similar non-Montessori students.

Language: English

Published: Commerce, Texas, 2013

Article

Report on Academic Achievement in a Private Montessori School

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 20, no. 2

Pages: 145-147

Academic achievement, Americas, Elementary education, Elementary school students, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals, Private schools, Standardized tests, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: A study at an established private Montessori school in a diverse suburb revealed strong achievement gains by students on the Stanford Achievement Test, which was administered to 36 students every year from second through eighth grade. Concludes that Montessori elementary education can take high achieving students and produce even higher academic results. (MDM)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Doctoral Dissertation

Comparison of the Academic Achievement of Primary School Students in Multiage and Traditional Classrooms

Available from: East Tennessee State University

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether students in a kindergarten/first-grade multiage class achieve at a different level than students enrolled in a traditional kindergarten or first-grade class in a selected primary school in East Tennessee. The question of the interaction between gender and type of instruction was also analyzed. The causal comparative quantitative research method was used to analyze data differentiating between students enrolled in multiage and traditional classes, retrospectively. A t-test was used to determine the level of performance the students demonstrated on the BRIGANCE K Screen at the beginning of the study. The number of mastered first-grade reading skills and mathematics skills, the score on the system-wide first-grade reading test and mathematics test, and gender interaction with type of instruction in each area were analyzed using ANCOVAs. Statistically significant results (pBRIGANCE 1 Screen(ANCOVA). In 1998, the combined males scored significantly higher than the combined females. In 1999, multiage males had significantly higher means than traditional males. ANCOVA results showed statistically significant difference in the number of mastered reading skills of the multiage students in 1998 as well as with the combination of all three years. The multiage mean was the higher of the two groups all three years. For the number of mastered mathematics skills, ANCOVA results showed a statistically significant difference in 1999 with the multiage scores higher than the traditional group. ANCOVA results showed no significant difference between the groups on the standardized reading and mathematics tests analyzed. Findings indicate that kindergarten students may benefit from kindergarten classes in a multiage setting, and that first-grade students may benefit from multiage settings in mastering skills in reading and mathematics but that benefit is not necessarily demonstrated by standardized test scores.

Language: English

Published: Johnson City, Tennessee, 2001

Master's Thesis

A Comparison of Two Approaches Used Within a Multi-tiered System of Supports That Enhance Students' Academic Achievement

Available from: Bethel University - Institutional Repository

Academic achievement, Inclusive education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Special education

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Abstract/Notes: While students are receiving a high-quality education within the classroom, some students face difficulty performing adequately on assessments. These students typically receive intervention support to assist in increasing their skill deficits. However, many schools are unaware of the different approaches they can implement within a Multi-Tiered System of Supports framework. While utilizing a standard protocol has been the preferred method, many schools are currently implementing the problem-solving approach because it targets one skill the student is struggling with. Little research has been conducted comparing or combining the two approaches leading schools to be clueless about which one will provide more positive results. A synthesis of articles implementing one or both approaches was conducted to determine which approach would work best in a Montessori school. Results showed an individualized approach might assist students more based on higher effect sizes. However, some researchers who compared the two approaches indicate both approaches are comparable in yielding positive results. To implement interventions effectively, educators must use an evidence-based intervention that’s explicit and structured, screen and monitor progress to make informed decisions, and implement the intervention with fidelity.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2023

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