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837 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Middle School Students’ Motivation and Quality of Experience: A Comparison of Montessori and Traditional School Environments

Available from: University of Chicago Press

Publication: American Journal of Education, vol. 111, no. 3

Pages: 341-371

Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Motivation (Psychology)

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Abstract/Notes: This study compared the motivation and quality of experience of demographically matched students from Montessori and traditional middle school programs. Approximately 290 students responded to the Experience Sampling Method (ESM) and filled out questionnaires. Multivariate analyses showed that the Montessori students reported greater affect, potency (i.e., feeling energetic), intrinsic motivation, flow experience, and undivided interest (i.e., the combination of high intrinsic motivation and high salience or importance) while engaged in academic activities at school. The traditional middle school students reported higher salience while doing academic work; however, such responses were often accompanied by low intrinsic motivation. When engaged in informal, nonacademic activities, the students in both school contexts reported similar experiences. These results are discussed in terms of current thought on motivation in education and middle school reform.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1086/428885

ISSN: 0195-6744, 1549-6511

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Relationship Between Anti-Bias Curriculum and Cultural Competency Among Middle School Students

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: Implementation of an anti-bias education framework is relatively new in the history of cultural competence movements. While some research has been done, sighting positive effects for K-12 students, few studies exist within the Montessori pedagogy. Furthermore, little research has been done in the effects of implementing this type of curriculum within a Montessori adolescent environment. Consequently, there is a need to gather information on effective anti-bias education best practices and how to introduce these strategies in a classroom environment. The purpose of this action research study is to explore how implementing anti-bias activities including literature, journaling, and Socratic discussions affect students’ cultural proficiency in a Montessori Middle School.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2019

Article

A Self-Concept Study of Middle School Students

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: The Constructive Triangle (1974-1989), vol. 16, no. 2

Pages: 11, 13, 26

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Language: English

ISSN: 0010-700X

Book

Why an Ungraded Middle School. Chapter 1, How to Organize and Operate an Ungraded Middle School. Successful School Administration Series

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: Experience of the Liverpool Middle School, Liverpool, New York, provides a rationale for organizing school systems to include ungraded middle schools. If, as evidence indicates, today's youth are maturing earlier, are more sophisticated, and are capable of greater accomplishment, then the traditional grade 7-8-9 arrangement does not meet the needs of ninth grade students while elementary schools can not meet the needs of sixth grade students. It is felt that grouping students by grades 6, 7, and 8 in the middle school aided solution of this problem. By introducing a multi-age grouping of students for each subject, each student's unique qualities and individual capabilities were recognized and given full educational advantage. This ungraded system required curriculum reform and flexible scheduling which were implemented along with a system of team teaching. Problems of team isolation, friction within teams, curriculum oriented outlooks, unwillingness to regroup students, and lack of evaluation of innovations were being solved. Progress made with the middle school concept indicates its viability. (TT)

Language: English

Published: [S.I.]: Prentice-Hall, Inc, 1967

Article

Seattle Adds Public Middle School Program [Meany Middle School]

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 10, no. 4

Pages: 22

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Exploring Montessori Programs for the Middle School Years: Athens [GA] Montessori Middle School: A Place for the Adolescent

Publication: Tomorrow's Child, vol. 11, no. 4

Pages: 5–7

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Low Initial Enrollment Dooms Middle School [Margaret Allen Middle School, Nashville, Tennessee]

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 17, no. 2

Pages: 1, 21

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Does Preschool Curriculum Make a Difference in Primary School Performance: Insights into the Variety of Preschool Activities and Their Effects on School Achievement and Behaviour in the Caribbean Island of Trinidad; Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal evidence

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Early Child Development and Care, vol. 103, no. 1

Pages: 27-42

Americas, Caribbean, Latin America and the Caribbean, Trinidad and Tobago

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Abstract/Notes: Preschool education is an important and much studied topic in developed countries, and of growing importance in the third world. Studies exploring preschool experience have noted positive effects when comparing children with access to preschool versus children without access, and effects of particular curriculum approaches over the length of primary schooling. This study adopts a focused sample, cross‐sectional design to explore the types of preschool experience available (denoted by types of preschool activities which equate broadly to curriculum approaches) and whether variation in preschool experience affects core curriculum (English, science, mathematics) performance and classroom behaviours throughout the years of primary schooling in Trinidad and when children complete their primary education in the form of a national ‘common entrance examination’ for entry into a stratified secondary school system. Results show that a large majority of the sampled children attended preschool and that most of the preschool experience was traditional and teacher centred. Neither child centred or teacher centred preschool activities affected academic performance in the core subjects during the primary school years or at the end of their primary school career. Type of preschool activity did affect teacher perception of behaviour in class. Child centred experience facilitated a social/peer orientation in children. High levels of teacher centred experience detracted from later relationships with teacher. Results were confounded by social class, with middle class children having most access to (the limited amount available) child centred preschool experience and performing at the highest academic and behavioural levels in the classroom although in limited numbers. The discussion questions the appropriacy of the various preschool activities for pupils within a cultural orientation of traditional upbringing and primary schooling practices.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/0300443941030103

ISSN: 0300-4430, 1476-8275

Article

Parents' Perceptions: The Transition of Public School Montessori Students into Traditional Middle Schools

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 16, no. 3

Pages: 87–97

Montessori schools, North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals, Parent attitudes, Perceptions, Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Montessori Middle School and the Transition to High School: Student Narratives

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 6, no. 2

Pages: 26-38

Americas, High school students, Middle school students, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This narrative study investigated through storytelling the experiences of five students who attended a Montessori middle school and then transitioned to a public high school. The testimonies of the participants highlighted that, to help students make a successful transition to high school, it is useful to consider three elements: (a) developing academic and social-emotional skills, (b) fostering positive attitudes toward learning, and (c) creating opportunities to practice self-reliance, self-advocacy, and grit. The experience of these particular students accentuates the ability of a Montessori middle school to emphasize both academic rigor and the social-emotional skills that build the fortitude necessary for students to successfully transition to high school. This study suggests that Montessori middle school practices may foster the intellectual and emotional growth of students so that they can successfully transition to high school and are potentially buffered from many of the detrimental academic and emotional impacts of ninth grade.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v6i2.13854

ISSN: 2378-3923

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