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5 results

Article

Multiculturalism and Montessori Education

Publication: Forza Vitale!, vol. 22, no. 2

Pages: 19–21

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

Article

Parents Ask . . . About Multiculturalism

Publication: Forza Vitale!, vol. 22, no. 2

Pages: 22

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

Article

Can the Montessori Method Have Developments in Secondary Education?

Publication: MoRE Montessori Research Europe newsletter

Pages: 6-7

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Maria Montessori’s method is deservedly well-known in the child education field, where thebrilliant educationist successfully extended to normal children what she had experimented with subnormal ones. The applicative method in the “Children’s Homes”, destined to welcome children from three to six years of age, was later developed for very young children in the Montessori Birth Centres and for the slightly older children in primary school. Now, we wonder whether it also has interesting aspects for lower and upper secondary schools. Montessori indeed devised a complete course of development divided into four six-year periods, as Comenius had already done. She thus did not limit herself to childhood and wrote a book Dall’infanzia all’adolescenza which gives an affirmative answer to the question and provides some guidelines. But, especially her son, Mario Montessori, working in many courses on psychoarithmetic and psychogeometry, showed how the directive principles of the method are not only applicable, but are indeed very effective also for lower secondary schools. Mathematics offers particularly useful examples. But even the grammatical and logical analysis performed by affixing labels indicating the functions of various parts of the discourse, already started up in the Montessori method for primary schooling, both for Italian and foreign languages, may be extended to lower secondary schools. The abstract essence of the symbols take on a tangible feature without renouncing their conveyance of concepts. The education of preadolescents and adolescents is not, however, only intellectual. It is also an education for feelings, openness to social cooperation and character building. The broader range of Montessorian thought is felt in education for peace, meant as a world task. And, opening up to multiculturalism and combating every discrimination, it offers secondary education challenging perspectives. Thus, religious education, which in Spain and Italy Maria Montessori linked to Catholic education, may be extended in an ecumenical spirit also to other religions, such as the oriental ones that she got to know in India.

Language: English

ISSN: 2281-8375

Article

To Touch the Spirit of the Child: A Multicultural Perspective

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 23, no. 1

Pages: 122-138

Cultural pluralism, Early childhood education, Montessori method of education, Multicultural education, Multiculturalism, Spirituality, Teacher-student relationships

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Abstract/Notes: Describes educational thinkers who pursue the intangibles in relation to children's education, and argues these intangibles are equally important as developing cognitive, affective, and psychomotor skills. Enumerates the universal needs of the educational process as including dialog (good listening and observation), bonding, and a spiritual perspective on the human condition.

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Education for Tomorrow: The Vision of Rabindranath Tagore

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Asian Studies Review, vol. 40, no. 1

Pages: 1-16

Asia, India, Rabindranath Tagore, Rabindranath Tagore - Biographic sources, Santiniketan (India), South Asia, Sriniketan (India), Viśva Bhāratī

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Abstract/Notes: This article investigates Rabindranath Tagore’s educational vision, which underpinned the three institutions he set up in India – Santiniketan (1901), Visva-Bharati (1921) and Sriniketan (1922). It argues that this vision is still relevant for the world of today and tomorrow, and that it should be taken into account in designing any educational model for the future. Tagore rejected the modern mechanical learning that focuses merely on cultivation of the individual’s mind, in favour of learning that encourages the creativity, imagination and moral awareness of students. He believed that education should be not for mere “success” or “progress” but for “illumination of heart” and for inculcation of a spirit of sympathy, service and self-sacrifice in the individual, so that s/he could rise above egocentrism and ethnocentrism to a state of global consciousness or worldcentrism. In pursuing this argument, I refer to Tagore’s letters, lectures, interviews and essays, both in Bengali and in English, a body of his short stories, his novel The Home and the World and his allegorical poem “Two Birds”. I also explain his awareness of the educational movements of his time in the West, and draw brief parallels with selected Western luminaries in the field, such as Plato, Montaigne, Rousseau and John Dewey. My contention is that although some may dismiss Tagore’s educational principles as “rickety sentimentalism” in a world that is palpable and real, his ideas of human fellowship, unity and creativity, and kinship for nature seem irrefutable with the rise of multiculturalism and the looming ecological crisis threatening world peace.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/10357823.2015.1125441

ISSN: 1035-7823

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