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437 results

Article

Sensory Perception: Learning to Use Our Natural Resources

Publication: LM Courier

Pages: 3–4

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

Article

The Growing Abundance of Natural Resources and the Wastefulness of Recycling

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 4, no. 3

Pages: 8–9

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Managing the Use of Resources in Multi-Grade Classrooms

Available from: African Journals Online

Publication: South African Journal of Education, vol. 39, no. 3

Africa, Classroom environment, Montessori materials, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Nongraded schools, Prepared environment, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Abstract/Notes: This study examined how teachers in multi-grade classrooms manage and use available resources in their classrooms. The study focused on multi-grade classrooms in farm schools in the Free State province of South Africa that cover Grades 1 to 9. The concepts “multi-grade classrooms” and “resources” are explained below. The availability and utilisation of resources in multi-grade classrooms is discussed in some depth. A qualitative research design was used to collect data. Interviews were conducted with 9 teachers who worked in multi-grade classrooms. The data reveals that the availability of resources has improved somewhat in the multi-grade classrooms surveyed; however, textbooks specifically meant for multi-grade classrooms are still lacking. The data also points to several other trends. For example, most multi-grade schools in the sample have insufficient resources. Where available, the resources are either under-utilised or used improperly. Furthermore, it is usually the case that learners are required to share resources across various grades. Moreover, teachers often use their personal resources to get their work done, and in this regard, smartphones play an important part. Finally, the study also reveals that teachers do try to use various types of resources to cater for different learning styles.Keywords: activity centres; classroom organisation; Montessori educational theory; multi-grade classrooms; resource corners; resources

Language: English

DOI: 10.15700/saje.v39n3a1599

ISSN: 2076-3433

Article

The Natural World as Prepared Environment

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 39, no. 1

Pages: 41-59

Child development, Conservation of natural resources, Early childhood education, Ecology, Montessori method of education, Natural resources, Prepared environment, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Louise Chawla's autobiographical beginning of this article shows the integration of her world-famous science of the environment and its relationship to early and middle childhood development as it finds its roots in Montessori education. Her academic training brought her to Edith Cobb's writing and unveiled the origins of kinship to the natural world in the developing young human. Her own exploration of nature and culture caused her to return to Montessori writings with a fresh understanding of the natural world as a prepared environment. Louise Chawla stresses that children must frequently encounter "the natural world with empathy and delight" and the prepared environment supports them as they become creative citizens of humanity. [This paper was prepared for the NAMTA Conference titled "Deschooling Montessori" January 25, 2002, in Scottsdale, AZ. Reprinted from "The NAMTA Journal" 27.3 (2002, Summer): 131-148 (see EJ661570).]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Bonding with the Natural World: The Roots of Environmental Awareness

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 38, no. 1

Pages: 39-51

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: With delicate literary style and allusions, Louise Chawla combines her ecological research and Montessori background to portray the unfolding of childhood in natural places. Starting with "enchantment with the world" as the basis for nature education for the child under six, the article suggests that the "loose parts" in the landscape that children manipulate and use result in optimal creative involvement. The act of finding favorite places in all weather, combined with the companionship of an adult role model, leads to a lifelong appreciation, concern, and activism for the natural world. [Reprinted from "The NAMTA Journal" 28,1 (2003, Winter): 133-154. This paper was prepared for the NAMTA Conference titled "Montessori Education for Human Development: The Child and the Natural World," October 31-November 3, 2002 in Chicago, IL.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Place-Based Education and Citizen Science: Resources for Learning Beyond the Classroom

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 43, no. 3

Pages: 4-22

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: This fully documented article about place-based education and citizen science offers annotated sources that can be used for Montessori programs at all levels and in all settings for site selection and curriculum connections. This compilation of resources can serve as a practical tool kit for organizing place-based learning in schools. The reader can enjoy this chapter by reading through from beginning to end or can simply go directly to the resources that are organized by type and topic.

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

The Natural World as Prepared Environment

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 27, no. 3

Pages: 131-148

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Weaves theoretical concepts of Maria Montessori and Edith Cobb to suggest that a moral, meaningful life is influenced by early contact with nature in which adults draw children's attention to its value. Suggests that nature is the prepared environment fostering cosmic harmony and asserts that educators should provide opportunities for early encounters with nature and learning about global needs around the use and distribution of natural resources. (KB)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Of Natural Science, Women's History, and Montessori's Theory of Knowledge

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 43, no. 3

Pages: 46-61

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Kathleen Allen's reverence for the stories of women naturalists spanning from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, and their parallel scientific interest in the documentation of life cycles through art and narratives, gives support to the child in history and nature that is so central to Montessori formal research and discipline. The parade of nearly a dozen short bios, from Beatrix Potter to Rachel Carson, frames not only a fresh outlook on science but also brings a soft feminist philosophical outlook while highlighting Montessori's connections to the natural world.This chapter is based on a talk presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Montessori History: Searching for Evolutionary Scientific Truth" in Cleveland, Ohio, April 20--22, 2018.

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

A Natural History of Repetition

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 5, no. 2

Pages: 15-44

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to understand typically developing children’s repetitive behavior in a free-play, daycare setting. By studying repetition in a non-Montessori setting, we tested the assumption that repetition is a characteristic behavior of all young children and not limited to the Montessori environment. Although Maria Montessori identified repetition during her observations, there is little empirical evidence to support her claim: most research has considered repetition in terms of psychopathology. We collected naturalistic observational data on 31 3- to 6-year-old children for a total of 101 hours to investigate the frequency, contexts, and structure of repetitive bouts. Multilevel model results suggest the ubiquity of repetition, as all children in the study engaged in motor repetition. Furthermore, repetition occurred throughout all free-play activities (construction, animation, fantasy play, rough-and-tumble play, and undirected activity), although repetition was not equally distributed across activities. Motor repetition was not equal across ages either; younger children engaged in more motor repetition than did older children. To understand the structure of repetition, our study also looked at the length of repetition bouts, which ranged from 2 to 19 repetitions and averaged 2.86 repetitions per bout. This natural history of repetition is an influential starting point for understanding the role of repetition in development and is informative to both Montessori and non-Montessori early childhood educators.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v5i2.7407

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

Bonding with the Natural World: The Roots of Environmental Awareness

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 28, no. 1

Pages: 133-154

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Combines insights from ecological research and Montessori theory and practice to portray the unfolding of childhood in natural places. Suggests that children's manipulation of the landscape results in optimal creative involvement. Maintains that the act of finding favorite places in all weather, combined with a positive role model, leads to lifelong appreciation, concern, and activism for the natural world. (Author/KB)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

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