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94 results

Doctoral Dissertation

Public Perceptions of Montessori Education

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Americas, Montessori method of education - Perceptions, North America, Public perception, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This study provides insight into the American public's perceptions of Montessori education one hundred years after its inception. The study is based on responses from an online survey with 1,520 members of an internet panel which was stratified to reflect the U.S. population based on age, ethnicity, gender, region, and income. The study answered research questions regarding how much the general public knows about Montessori education, perceptions of Montessori education and the attitudes and demographic characteristics that are associated with positive perceptions of Montessori education. The study found high awareness of the term "Montessori," but lower knowledge of the specifics of Montessori education. Generally favorable perceptions of Montessori education were also discovered along with less widespread evidence of commonly reported criticisms. Finally, and not surprisingly, familiarity with Montessori education led to more positive opinions of Montessori education as did stronger beliefs that schools should play a role in children's development beyond academics.

Language: English

Published: Lawrence, Kansas, 2008

Doctoral Dissertation

Dispelling Perceptions: Montessori Education – Attaining Common Ground with Public Schools

Available from: University of California eScholarship

Montessori method of education, Public Montessori

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Abstract/Notes: Using concepts from cognitive science, this dissertation explored changes in perception among Montessori education leaders and traditional education leaders. Although Montessori education programs have grown as an option in the public school sector, their unique features in mainstream environments have brought to the fore serious challenges in understanding and communication between decision makers at the institutional level of public education and among Montessori academies. Nationally, Montessori education entities have fostered a strong momentum for improvement at the state policy level. However in some states, including California, differing perceptions still hinder inclusive decision making, resulting in lack of teacher credential recognition, denial of eligibility and funding. My study implemented a communication intervention through which an iterative conversation between both sides aimed to address perceptions and language and provide shared understandings. Using the challenge between Montessori and traditional public education and framed under the cognitive theories of mental models, framing, schemas, metaphors and embodiment, this intervention addressed whether perceptions can begin to shift when one is more fully informed at a deeper cognitive level. Incorporating a workshop intervention involving several modalities, my findings suggested a shift in perception which seemed to persist over time. The effects in shifting actors’ perceptions of Montessori education were statistically significant and modest in terms of magnitude. I also found a weaker perceptual shift among traditional educators in California compared with peers in other states. I obtained specific suggestions for future iterations of kinesthetic learning, along with how to best share perspectives between Montessori and traditional leaders, along with possible collaborations between these pedagogies.

Language: English

Published: Berkeley, California, 2016

Article

Self-Efficacy Perceptions of Teachers on Using the Montessori Method in Special Education in North Cyprus

Available from: World Center of Innovation Research and Publication

Publication: Cypriot Journal of Educational Sciences, vol. 14, no. 4

Pages: 652-660

Asia, Cyprus, Efficacy, Middle East, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Perceptions, Special education, Western Asia

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Abstract/Notes: The aim of this study is to determine the self-efficacy perceptions of special education teachers about the use of the Montessori method by a valid and reliable scale developed by the researcher. The model of the research is a general descriptive model of quantitative research methods. In the 2017–2018 academic year, 67 special education teachers who work under the Directorate of Primary Education of the Ministry of National Education of the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus are participated in this research universe, which comprise 29, 12, 20, 4 and 2 teachers from Special Education Application Centre, Special Education and Work Application Centre, primary schools, kindergartens and school for visually impaired, respectively. This study was conducted only with all the special education teachers in the universe not by any sampling method. The general proficiency perceptions of the special education teachers for the use of the Montessori method were at the level of instability. According to the general competency perceptions of the female teachers on the use of the Montessori method, it was found that their responses were more positive than the males.

Language: English

DOI: 10.18844/cjes.v11i4.4480

ISSN: 1305-905X

Article

Montessori Junior High School Students’ Perceptions on Their Self-Efficacy in Reading

Available from: Universitas Islam Negeri Sunan Ampel Surabaya Digital Library

Publication: IJET (Indonesian Journal of English Teaching), vol. 8, no. 2

Pages: 26-37

Asia, Australasia, Indonesia, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Perceptions, Southeast Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori approach deals with learning in independence and liberty. This way of learning requires students to explore information based on their learning interest. Therefore, reading has become one of the keys in learning successfully in a Montessori school. Moreover, the impact of self-efficacy on the learning outcomes has been explored in the educational psychology as a field of study. This study inspects students’ self-efficacy perceptions and their factors in reading comprehension in a Montessori Junior High School registered in 2018-2019 academic year. It is located in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. English is the main language used in the teaching-learning process in the school. The study is conducted by using mixed method. Findings are based on the 27 close-ended questions and three open-ended questions obtained from the students in grade seven and eight. In analyzing the results, concurrent triangulation strategy is applied. The results show that the students have positive self-efficacy perceptions on their reading (Average= 3.449/5), especially in reading, explaining, summarizing texts and comprehending the graphics found in the text without the guidance of their teachers. Their self-efficacy sources are found in their mastery experiences, vicarious experiences, verbal persuasion, and emotional and psychological states.

Language: English

DOI: 10.15642/ijet2.2019.8.2.26-37

ISSN: 2548-6497

Article

Junior High School Students’ Perceptions on the Implementation of Montessori Approach in Vocabulary Learning

Available from: Universitas Nusantara PGRI Kediri

Publication: English Education: Journal of English Teaching and Research, vol. 4, no. 2

Pages: 75-92

Asia, Australasia, Indonesia, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Perceptions, Southeast Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori approach is mostly used in the kindergarten and elementary school, especially in Indonesia. To explore the approach in the higher level of education, the research took place in a private Montessori Junior High School in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. This study is intended to investigate the students’ perceptions on the implementation of Montessori approach to improve their vocabulary due to the fact that vocabulary is central to language learning. The research participants are students in grades seven and eight. There were three research instruments in this study, namely observations, questionnaire, and Focus Group Discussion (FGD). Three different research instruments were used to make sure that the data obtained was valid. The researchers crosschecked the results from each instrument to triangulate data consistency. Based on the findings, the students have positive perceptions on the implementation of Montessori approach for vocabulary learning. The implementation of Montessori approach promotes its unique learning activities, teacher’s personal guidance, and students’ learning awareness, internal motivation, and interest. The students perceived that the implementation of Montessori approach can improve their vocabulary.

Language: English

DOI: 10.29407/jetar.v4i2.13662

ISSN: 2503-4405

Article

Teachers’ Perceptions of Supporting Pre-School Children in Self-Learning in Montessori Classrooms: A Case Study of Three Saudi Pre-Schools

Available from: Multi-Knowledge Electronic Comprehensive Journal for Education and Science Publications

Publication: Multi-Knowledge Electronic Comprehensive Journal for Education and Science Publications, no. 37

Pages: 1-21

Asia, Middle East, Montessori method of education, Saudi Arabia, Preschool children, Saudi Arabia, Teachers - Attitudes, Western Asia, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Teaching at pre-school in Saudi Arabia can involve the use of many types of teaching methods, and the Montessori educational system is one approach that can be used. Over time, this method has gained value and popularity due to its promotion of a self-learning strategy. This current study aims to explore the perceptions of Montessori teachers working in Saudi Arabia about their role in supporting a self-learning strategy for pre-school children. The research sample comprised Montessori teachers working at three schools in Saudi Arabia. Data was collected by undertaking qualitative semi-structured interviews and using an unstructured questionnaire. The interviews was piloted in advanced. The findings show that most of the Saudi pre-school teachers who participated are knowledgeable about teaching the Montessori system in the classroom, and have knowledge of applying the self-learning strategy. However, in practice, their role in supporting children to achieve self-learning is affected by various factors, including: the overall ethos of the Saudi education system, the Ministry of Education’s perceptions about teaching pre-school children using the Montessori system, the teacher’s background and their years of experiences working with pre-school children, and the use of individual education plans for each child.

Language: English

ISSN: 2617-9563

Article

Montessori Early Childhood Teacher Perceptions of Family Priorities and Stressors

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 1, no. 1

Pages: 1-13

Perceptions

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Abstract/Notes: Teachers of young children work closely with families. One component of teacher-family partnerships is teachers’ understanding of family priorities and stressors. This study examines Montessori early childhood (ages three through six) teacher perceptions of family priorities and stressors through an analysis of responses to two parallel surveys. Eighty teachers (37% of those who received the survey) and forty-nine family members (representing a 55% response rate) completed the survey. Significant differences were found between teachers’ perceptions of four (of seven) family priorities and families’ actual responses. Teachers ranked “making academic progress” as the most important of seven possible family priorities. However, families stated that “developing kindness” is the most important priority for their young children. No significant differences were found when comparing teacher rankings of family stressors with actual family responses. Montessori early childhood teachers ranked “not having enough time” as the most stressful of six possible stressors. Families confirmed that time pressures cause them the most stress. Maria Montessori’s recommendations for teachers and families are summarized. Recommendations for building stronger family partnerships in the context of Montessori’s philosophy, for example on-going self-reflection, are provided.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v1i1.4939

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

Pupils' perceptions of setting and beyond—a response to Hallam and Ireson

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: British Educational Research Journal, vol. 34, no. 6

Pages: 855-863

Perceptions

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Abstract/Notes: This article examines the important data on pupils' perceptions of setting and mixed-ability classes in 45 comprehensive schools in England collected by Hallam and Ireson. It is argued that the finding that most pupils prefer setting to mixed-ability classes requires closer scrutiny and more careful interpretation. The conclusion that such preferences are because setting matches pupils' needs to their abilities is not compelling. Pupils' perceptions may be a product of transmitted ideology and wider cultural and organisational factors inside and outside school. Moreover, it is not clear what the implications of Hallam and Ireson's data on mixed-ability classes are for mixed-ability teaching. While, Hallam and Ireson propose more differentiated teaching and learning in mixed-ability classes, this article contends that their data could be interpreted to imply just the opposite. Finally, the implications of their data for the debate about the nature of comprehensive education in Britain are considered.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/01411920802044511

ISSN: 0141-1926, 1469-3518

Article

Advantages of Mixed-age Free Play in Elementary School: Perceptions of Students, Teachers, and Parents

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: International Journal of Play, vol. 10, no. 1

Pages: 75-92

Perceptions

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Abstract/Notes: Mixed-age groups have been shown to be effective in classroom settings, but only a handful of studies have explored mixed-age grouping in play. This research is a case study of one New York public elementary school that places great value on recess and mixed-age groupings. The school has implemented Let Grow Play Club before school one day per week for students in kindergarten through fifth grade. We use child interviews, teacher interviews, and parent surveys to examine the perceptions of mixed-age, outdoor play provided in Play Club and the school more generally. Across the different types of data, stakeholders expressed their support for cross-age interactions in mixed-age groupings. This play was perceived as valuable for helping build friendships and developing social skills, as older children become role models to younger ones. As suggested by Vygotsky’s (1978) theories, children are learning from one another and enhancing their development through unstructured play.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/21594937.2021.1878774

ISSN: 2159-4937

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Effects of Classroom Talk Lessons on Student Perceptions of Collaborative Group Work in a Remote, Synchronous Montessori Elementary Learning Environment

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, COVID-19 Pandemic, Lower elementary, Online learning

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Abstract/Notes: This mixed-methods action research examined the effects of classroom talk lessons on children’s perceptions of collaborative group work in an online Montessori learning environment during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants were 19 Lower Elementary students and one teacher/investigator. All work was online, both synchronous and asynchronous. Students were presented with lessons in classroom talk, and practiced these skills during online collaboration in the creation of a student newsletter. Key findings were that students use of classroom talk behaviors and rigorous thinking increased slightly over the four-week period and students’ perceptions of their community identity and the value of their ideas increased over the course of the intervention, most notably in younger students. Teaching classroom talk had positive effects on student agency, depth of collaborative work, and grace and courtesy in this digital Montessori classroom. Respectful disagreement was identified as an area for future study.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2021

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