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Article

Persönlichkeitsbildung und Jahrgangsmischung [Personality development and mixed-age groups]

Publication: Montessori: Zeitschrift für Montessori-Pädagogik, vol. 37, no. 1

Pages: 5-19

Nongraded schools, Personality development

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Language: German

ISSN: 0944-2537

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

IES Arrow-Dot Longitudinal Study of Personality Development in Preschool Children

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 40, no. 1

Pages: 209-210

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Abstract/Notes: Preschool children were administered the IES Arrow-Dot at the beginning and end of the school year and scores compared with those based on a prior study in a Montessori preschool. Developmental trends of declining Impulsivity and rising Ego scores were corroborated. Superego development remained almost stable in contrast to a significant rise for the Montessori sample. Results support effective use of the test with preschoolers to assess baselines and developmental patterns of personality integration.

Language: English

DOI: 10.2466/pms.1975.40.1.209

ISSN: 1558-688X, 0031-5125

Article

Four Parent-Child Relationships and Their Influence on Personality Development

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: The Constructive Triangle (1965-1973), vol. 7, no. 3

Pages: 18-19

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Language: English

ISSN: 0010-700X

Article

In the Home: Four Parent-Child Relationships and Their Influence on Personality Development

Publication: AMS News, vol. 1, no. 1

Pages: 5

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Language: English

ISSN: 0065-9444

Book

Talent for the future: social and personality development of gifted children: Proceedings of the Ninth world conference on gifted and talented children

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Language: English

Published: Assen: Van Gorcum & Co., 1992

ISBN: 90-232-2656-9

Conference Paper

Multistructural Model of Speech and Language Development in Montessori Pedagogy

Available from: ICLEL

2nd International Conference on Lifelong Education and Leadership for ALL-ICLEL 2016

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Abstract/Notes: The goal of the article is to provide theoretical justification of the speech and language development multistructural model, analyse speech therapists’ opinion about the significance of various language development preconditions in the child’s speech and language development, as well as justify application options of the multistructural model in the Montessori pedagogy aspect. In Latvia every second or third pre-school aged child has insufficient or impaired speech and language development. Assessing the child’s language development, it has to be taken into account how it is influenced by the combination of different endogenous and exogenous factors, which lie into a diverse mutual interaction. The interaction model of factors in each individual case is different and it determines the individual character of the child’s language development process. The speech or language impairment is not quite often the leading (primary) symptom, but as a part of an illness, specific psychological or socially economic condition and is considered as a secondary phenomenon. In order to state all possible causes of the language development delay or impairment, their possible interaction and to work out an appropriate correction and development plan, the peculiarities of the speech and language development multistructural model of each individual case have to be found out. Understanding the reasons of the insufficient language development or impairment and their elimination, reduction or compensation guarantees a more efficient pedagogic or speech therapy correction process. However, teachers or speech therapists do not always observe it in their professional work, as still the main attention is being paid to the expressions of development insufficiency or impairment and not to the causal identification and decrease of their negative impact. Montessori pedagogy is as one of the methods, in which the holistic approach is implemented in the educational and also correction process, and thus also the speech and language development multistructural model.

Language: English

Published: Sakarya, Turkey: ICLEL Conferences, Sakarya University Faculty of Education, 2016

Pages: 429-437

ISBN: 978-605-66495-1-6

Doctoral Dissertation

Φύση και αγωγή στη διαδικασία διαμόρφωσης της προσωπικότητας: εξέταση των ιδεών των Ζ.Ζ. Ρουσσώ, Μ. Μοντεσσόρι, Κ. Ρότζερς και Λ. Βυγκότσκι [Nature and education in the process of personality development: an analysis of the ideas of J.J. Rousseau, M. Montessori, C. Rogers and L. Vygotsky]

Available from: Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

Carl Rogers - Biographic sources, Carl Rogers - Philosophy, Child development, Jean-Jacques Rousseau - Biographic sources, Jean-Jacques Rousseau - Philosophy, Lev Vygotsky - Biographic sources, Lev Vygotsky - Philosophy, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Maturation (Psychology), Student-centered learning

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Abstract/Notes: Η παρούσα διατριβή επιχειρεί τη διερεύνηση της διαμόρφωσης της προσωπικότητας υπό το πρίσμα της αλληλεπίδρασης μεταξύ των βιολογικών και των κοινωνικών συνιστωσών της ανάπτυξης του παιδιού, όπως την πραγματεύονται οι θεωρίες του Ζαν-Ζακ Ρουσσώ, της Μαρίας Μοντεσσόρι, του Καρλ Ρότζερς και του Λεβ Βυγκότσκι. Δεδομένου ότι η προσωπικότητα αποτελεί το επίκεντρο κάθε παιδαγωγικής θεωρίας συνιστώντας το ιδεώδες στο οποίο αποσκοπεί η αγωγή, εξετάζονται οι δυνατότητες και οι περιορισμοί της αγωγής όσον αφορά τη διαμόρφωση της προσωπικότητας των παιδιών μέσω της συγκριτικής ανάλυσης της πολιτισμικής-ιστορικής θεωρίας του Λ. Βυγκότσκι και της παιδοκεντρικής παράδοσης, όπως εκφράζεται στις θεωρίες του Ζ.Ζ. Ρουσσώ, της Μ. Μοντεσσόρι και οτου Κ. Ρότζερς. Στο πρώτο κεφάλαιο επιχειρείται η εννοιολόγηση του όρου προσωπικότητα όπως αποτυπώνεται στις κυριότερες θεωρίες προσωπικότητας και στα επόμενα κεφάλαια παρουσιάζονται και εξεταζονται κριτικά οι θεωρίες των τεσσάρων προαναφερθέντων στοχαστών. Τέλος, διατυπώνονται ορισμένα μεθοδολογικά συμπεράσματα σχετικά με τη διαλεκτική αλληλεπίδραση μεταξύ φύσης και αγωγής στη διαδικασία διαμόρφωσης της προσωπικότητας και αναδεικνύεται η συμβολή των τεσσάρων θεωριών που εξετάστηκαν στη διαμόρφωση της παιδαγωγικής σκέψης. Επιπλέον, προσεγγίζεται η έννοια της ολόπλευρα ανεπτυγμένης προσωπικότητας ως σκοπού της αγωγής. [The present thesis aims to study personality development in the light of the interaction between biological and social factors of child development as it is discussed in the theories of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Maria Montessori, Carl Rogers and Lev Vygotsky. Given the fact that personality development constitutes the centre of every pedagogical theory, being the ideal to which education aims, the potential and the limits of education with regard to the development of children’s personality are examined through the comperative analysis of L. Vygotsky’s cultural-historical theory, and the child-centred tradition as it is presented in the theories of J.J. Rousseau, M. Montessori, and C. Rogers. In the first chapter there is an attempt to conceptually delineate the term personality as it is outlined in the main personality theories, and in the following chapters the theories of the four thinkers mentioned above are presented and critically examined. Finally, some methodological conclusions concerning the dialectical interaction between nature and education in the process of personality development are put forth, and the contribution of the four theories which were investigated in the development of pedagogical thinking is highlighted. Furthermore, the notion of the wholly developed personality as the goal of education is approached.]

Language: Greek

Published: Thessaloniki, Greece, 2018

Doctoral Dissertation

The Developmental Psychology of Maria Montessori (Italy)

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori is historically recognized for her contributions to early education. Her primary recognition derived from the comprehensive educational program which became known as the Montessori Method. Relatively little attention has focused on her background as physician, psychiatrist, and pedagogical psychologist, from which she developed a body of psychological knowledge which established the foundation of the well-known Method. Her pedagogical psychology was overshadowed by her pedagogical theory despite her secure position in the history of child psychiatry. Also contributing to the non-acceptance of Montessori's psychology was the psychological tenor of the times. In the forefront of the psychological movement in the early 1900's were psychometric testing, Freud's psycho-sexual stages, Thorndike's stimulus-response theory, and the emergence of behaviorism under the leadership of Watson, to name a few. This climate was not hospitable to Montessori's developmental-interactionist theory. In the 1960's through the research findings of psychologists and the availability of Federal funds to compensate the "cumulative deficits" of the disadvantaged child, interest was focused on early childhood education and consequently the Montessori Method. As psychologists embraced Piaget's developmental theory, resemblances in thinking between Piaget and Montessori were noted. While psychologists pointed to Montessori's developmental-interactionist ideas, nobody attempted to elaborate her developmental theory in toto. This study attempts to do so. For Montessori, the development of the child takes place in successive and qualitatively different stages, with each stage providing the foundation for succeeding stages. Within this framework, she clearly delineates cognitive, motor, language, socialization, personality, and character as developing through stages. Cognitive structures develop through the child's interaction with, and actions upon, objects in the environment. A thorough examination of her theory leaves no doubt that Montessori is a cognitive developmentalist. While at times she appears nativistic, and at other times an extreme environmentalist, her position on development is interactionist and constructivist. Montessori is historically recognized for her contributions to early education. Her primary recognition derived from the comprehensive educational program which became known as the Montessori Method. Relatively little attention has focused on her background as physician, psychiatrist, and pedagogical psychologist, from which she developed a body of psychological knowledge which established the foundation of the well-known Method. Her pedagogical psychology was overshadowed by her pedagogical theory despite her secure position in the history of child psychiatry. Also contributing to the non-acceptance of Montessori's psychology was the psychological tenor of the times. In the forefront of the psychological movement in the early 1900's were psychometric testing, Freud's psycho-sexual stages, Thorndike's stimulus-response theory, and the emergence of behaviorism under the leadership of Watson, to name a few. This climate was not hospitable to Montessori's developmental-interactionist theory. In the 1960's through the research findings of psychologists and the availability of Federal funds to compensate the "cumulative deficits" of the disadvantaged child, interest was focused on early childhood education and consequently the Montessori Method. As psychologists embraced Piaget's developmental theory, resemblances in thinking between Piaget and Montessori were noted. While psychologists pointed to Montessori's developmental-interactionist ideas, nobody attempted to elaborate her developmental theory in toto. This study attempts to do so. For Montessori, the development of the child takes place in successive and qualitatively different stages, with each stage providing the foundation for succeeding stages. Within this framework, she clearly delineates cognitive, motor, language, socialization, personality, and character as developing through stages. Cognitive structures develop through the child's interaction with, and actions upon, objects in the environment. A thorough examination of her theory leaves no doubt that Montessori is a cognitive developmentalist. While at times she appears nativistic, and at other times an extreme environmentalist, her position on development is interactionist and constructivist. In contemporary terms her "psychopedagogy" would be considered an action psychology, which basically precludes it from academic "respectibility". Her theory contains both strengths and weaknesses in light of present-day thinking; however, on balance, Montessori's theory is quite contemporary and remarkably ahead of most of the psychological thinking of her time.

Language: English

Published: New York, 1982

Article

Montessori Eğitiminin Çocukların Gelişimine Etkisinin İncelenmesi / Investigation of the Effects of Montessori Education on Children's Development

Available from: Academia

Publication: Hacettepe University Graduate School of Educational Sciences - The Journal of Educational Research, vol. 1, no. 1

Pages: 32-52

Asia, Middle East, Montessori method of education, Turkey, Western Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Bu araştırmada, Montessori yaklaşımı doğrultusunda gerçekleştirilen öğretmen eğitimi ve eğitim ortamınındüzenlenmesi sonucu üç, dört ve beş yaş (36-72 ay) grubundaki (deney ve kontrol grubu) çocuklara verilen Montessori yaklaşımına dayalı eğitimin çocukların gelişim alanları üzerindeki etkisini saptamakamaçlanmıştır. Araştırmada, Montessori yaklaşımına dayalı eğitimin çocukların gelişim alanlarına olanetkisini belirlemek amacıyla ön test ve son test kontrol gruplu deneysel desen kullanılmıştır. Ankara Üniversitesi Uygulama Anaokulu 1’e devam eden çocuklar deney grubunu, okul yöneticileri ile öğretmengörüşleri doğrultusunda benzer özelliklere sahip olduğu düşünülen bir üniversite anaokuluna devam edençocuklar ise kontrol grubunu oluşturmuştur. Araştırmada demografik verileri toplamak amacıyla “Genel BilgiFormu”, çocukların gelişim alanlarını değerlendirmek için Alpern (2007) tarafından geliştirilen Gelişimsel Profil 3 (GP3) ile Mardell ve Goldenberg (1998) tarafından geliştirilen Öğrenmenin Değerlendirilmesi için Gelişimsel Göstergeler 4 (ÖDGG-4) kullanılmıştır. Montessori yaklaşımına dayalı eğitim öncesinde ilkolarak Montessori eğitim ortamı oluşturulmuş ve gelişimsel değerlendirme labratuvarı hazır halegetirilmiştir. Ardından öğretmenler “Montessori Uygulayıcıların Eğitimi” kapsamında eğitim almışlardır.Çalışma sonucunda öğretmen görüşüne göre ÖDGG-4’den elde edilen bulgular incelendiğinde, deney vekontrol grubundaki çocukların öz bakım becerileri ile sosyal duygusal gelişim alt boyutu puanlarında, ebeveyn görüşlerine göre öz bakım becerileri alt boyutu ile toplam gelişim puanlarında deney grubu lehineanlamlı farklılık olduğu saptanmıştır. GP-3’e ait sonuçlar incelendiğinde de deney ve kontrol grubundakiçocukların öğretmen görüşlerine göre uyumsal davranış boyutunda; ebeveyn görüşlerine göre fizikselgelişim, bilişsel gelişim, iletişim alt boyutları ile toplam gelişim puanlarında deney grubu lehine anlamlıfarklılık olduğu belirlenmiştir. / The present study was aimed at determining the development levels of children aged three, four andfive (36-72 months) attending Ankara University Practice Preschool 1, and the effect of Montessorieducational approach on their areas of development. A pretest, posttest, retention test experimental designwith control group was adopted in the study to determine the effect of Montessori educational approach on children’s areas of development. The experimental group consisted of children attending Ankara University Practice Preschool 1, while the control group consisted of attending a randomly selected university preschool with similar qualifications. The General Information Form was used for data collection purposes,while the Developmental Profile 3 (DP-3) developed by Alpern (2007) and the Developmental Indicators forthe Assessment of Learning 4 (DIAL-4) developed by Mardell and Goldenberg (1998) whose validity and reliability studies were used as assessment tools to evaluate children’s areas of development. Prior to theimplementation of Montessori education, Montessori educational environment was prepared and adevelopmental assessment laboratory was set up. Thereafter, teachers received the MontessoriPractitioner Training. DIAL-4 results according to teachers’ opinions revealed significant differences between the children in experimental and control groups in self-help skills and social emotional development subscale scores, while according to parents’ opinions, there were significant differences in the self-help skills subcale and overall development scores. DP-3 results revealed significant differencesbetween the children in experimental and control groups in the adaptive behavior subscale according to teachers’ opinions, and physical development, cognitive development and communication subscale scores,as well as, overall development scores of the DP-3 according to parents’ opinions.

Language: Turkish

Doctoral Dissertation

Comparison of Montessori and Non-Montessori Teachers' Beliefs About Developmentally Appropriate Practice in Preschools

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: In this study, 173 preschool teachers (80 non-Montessori teachers and 93 Montessori teachers) were given a survey at two early childhood professional conferences that examined their beliefs about Developmentally Appropriate Practice (DAP). The purpose of this study was to (a) investigate preschool teachers' beliefs about Developmentally Appropriate Practice (DAP) and Developmentally Inappropriate Practice (DIP); (b) discover the similarities and differences in the factor structures of the Teacher's Beliefs Scale (TBS) between the study conducted by Charlesworth, Hart, Burts, Thomasson, Mosley, and Fleege in 1993 and the current study about DAP; (c) discover the similarities and differences of Developmentally Appropriate Practice (DAP) and Developmentally Inappropriate Practice (DIP) beliefs between Montessori teachers and preschool teachers; and (d) investigate the factors that are related to teachers' beliefs about DAP and DIP. The Teacher Beliefs Scale (TBS) was used to assess preschool teachers' beliefs about DAP and DIP. Factor analysis was used to support the validity of TBS in the current study. Multiple t-tests were used to identify the differences in developmental appropriate/inappropriate beliefs between Montessori and non-Montessori teachers. Multiple regression analyses were used to explain the relationship between variables of 173 Montessori and non-Montessori preschool teachers. Results of the study showed that a majority of preschool teachers agreed with 22 Developmentally Appropriate Practices (DAP) and 12 Developmentally Inappropriate Practices (DIP). Responses to seven items were different from the original study (Charlesworth et al., 1993). There was a significant difference on Inappropriate Activities and on Appropriate Child Choice between non-Montessori and Montessori teachers. There was a relationship between teachers' beliefs about DAP and teachers' educational backgrounds, teaching experiences, ethics, and DAP understanding level in the current study.

Language: English

Published: Greeley, Colorado, 2003

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