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634 results

Doctoral Dissertation

Public Perceptions of Montessori Education

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Americas, Montessori method of education - Perceptions, North America, Public perception, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This study provides insight into the American public's perceptions of Montessori education one hundred years after its inception. The study is based on responses from an online survey with 1,520 members of an internet panel which was stratified to reflect the U.S. population based on age, ethnicity, gender, region, and income. The study answered research questions regarding how much the general public knows about Montessori education, perceptions of Montessori education and the attitudes and demographic characteristics that are associated with positive perceptions of Montessori education. The study found high awareness of the term "Montessori," but lower knowledge of the specifics of Montessori education. Generally favorable perceptions of Montessori education were also discovered along with less widespread evidence of commonly reported criticisms. Finally, and not surprisingly, familiarity with Montessori education led to more positive opinions of Montessori education as did stronger beliefs that schools should play a role in children's development beyond academics.

Language: English

Published: Lawrence, Kansas, 2008

Doctoral Dissertation

Dispelling Perceptions: Montessori Education – Attaining Common Ground with Public Schools

Available from: University of California eScholarship

Montessori method of education, Public Montessori

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Abstract/Notes: Using concepts from cognitive science, this dissertation explored changes in perception among Montessori education leaders and traditional education leaders. Although Montessori education programs have grown as an option in the public school sector, their unique features in mainstream environments have brought to the fore serious challenges in understanding and communication between decision makers at the institutional level of public education and among Montessori academies. Nationally, Montessori education entities have fostered a strong momentum for improvement at the state policy level. However in some states, including California, differing perceptions still hinder inclusive decision making, resulting in lack of teacher credential recognition, denial of eligibility and funding. My study implemented a communication intervention through which an iterative conversation between both sides aimed to address perceptions and language and provide shared understandings. Using the challenge between Montessori and traditional public education and framed under the cognitive theories of mental models, framing, schemas, metaphors and embodiment, this intervention addressed whether perceptions can begin to shift when one is more fully informed at a deeper cognitive level. Incorporating a workshop intervention involving several modalities, my findings suggested a shift in perception which seemed to persist over time. The effects in shifting actors’ perceptions of Montessori education were statistically significant and modest in terms of magnitude. I also found a weaker perceptual shift among traditional educators in California compared with peers in other states. I obtained specific suggestions for future iterations of kinesthetic learning, along with how to best share perspectives between Montessori and traditional leaders, along with possible collaborations between these pedagogies.

Language: English

Published: Berkeley, California, 2016

Doctoral Dissertation

Square Pegs in Round Holes: Montessori Principals' Perceptions of Science Education in Texas Public Schools

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine the perceptions of Texas public Montessori school principals as instructional leaders in science. Twelve public Montessori school principals were interviewed for this study. Two research questions were used: How do public Montessori principals perceive Texas science standards in public Montessori Elementary classrooms? How do principals view their role as an instructional leader in elementary science related to teachers' effectiveness and student outcomes? Research question one resulted in the following themes: (a) aligning curricula to the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS), (b) engaging science instruction as integrated and hands-on lessons, (c) emphasizing required district and state assessments, and (d) incorporating traditional teaching methodologies to support Montessori instruction. Research question two yielded common themes: (a) balancing Montessori methodologies and philosophies in public school settings with competing demands, (b) monitoring assessment scores as the determination of student success, (c) working in collaboration to support teacher effectiveness, and (d) providing resources and support to teachers. Implications for Montessori practitioners: paradox of Montessori education in a public school setting, strong support for science in classrooms from the principal and a need for continued research around Montessori education in public school settings.

Language: English

Published: Beaumont, Texas, 2013

Report

The Possibility of Public Montessori Schools: Examining the Montessori philosophy and its prospect in American public schools

Available from: Vanderbilt University Institutional Repository

Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, Public Montessori, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: In an effort to explore the ways in which Montessori curriculum and public schools are cooperative or mutually exclusive, I will examine the principles of the Montessori philosophy as set forth by Dr. Maria Montessori in the areas of learners and learning, the learning environment, the curriculum and instructional strategies, and student assessment. After examining these sectors of the Montessori method, I will discuss theoretical possibilities in adapting the Montessori method to the American public school system in the early 21st century. For the purpose of this paper, I will refer to the author of the Montessori method, as "Dr. Montessori" and call the general method or portions thereof as "Montessori."

Language: English

Published: Nashville, Tennessee, 2007

Article

Public School Montessorian is now Montessori Public

Available from: MontessoriPublic

Publication: Montessori Public, vol. 1, no. 1

Pages: 3

Public Montessori, Public Montessori - Periodicals, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

Article

Parents' Perceptions: The Transition of Public School Montessori Students into Traditional Middle Schools

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 16, no. 3

Pages: 87–97

Montessori schools, Parent attitudes, Perceptions, Public Montessori, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Doctoral Dissertation

An Examination of Culturally Relevant Pedagogy and Antibias-Antiracist Curriculm in a Montessori Setting

Available from: Lynn University - Electronic Theses and Dissertations

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Abstract/Notes: The research consisted of a qualitative case study of three urban public Montessori schools with a population of 51% or more of students of color and a commitment of 2 years or more of CRP-ABAR within a Montessori setting. The theoretical framework used for the study was the critical race theory, which is the conceptual foundation for examining inequities in public education. This research dissertation had a focus on gaining an insight into the perceptions of administrators, teachers, and parents toward CRP-ABAR in Montessori schools by examining the practices in three public Montessori schools. The possible connections to student outcomes, such as behavioral referrals, suspension rates, and academic achievement for students of color were explored to determine if any connections exist between CRP-ABAR and outcomes for students of color within a public Montessori setting. Three major themes emerged of the perceptions of administrators, teachers, and parents about the impact of the CRP-ABAR in a Montessori setting. The CRP-ABAR could be delivered through a curriculum-oriented approach or a systemic-oriented approach and the CRP-ABAR connects to Montessori through peace-global education and the prepared teacher-environment. The CRP-ABAR practices impact students of color primarily through social emotional growth with limited academic outcomes. Even with an intentional focus and diversity training, many non-Black teachers’ perceptions of students of color included deficit theory thinking. Some parents believed racism is being dismantled through the curriculum and celebrations of diversity. Other parents identified some teachers-staff with underpinning instances of biases and insensitivity.

Language: English

Published: Boca Raton, Florida, 2020

Article

Montessori Methods in Public Schools

Publication: Education Digest, vol. 56, no. 1

Pages: 63-66

Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, Public Montessori, United States of America, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: The article describes Montessori instruction and how this method is being increasingly adopted by public schools. Although private schools remain the primary settings for Montessori instruction in the U.S., the philosophy and methods identified with the movement have spread rapidly in the public system in the 1980s. First embraced by public educators in the mid-1970s as a theme for magnet programs designed to spur desegregation, the approach is now being used in about 110 public schools in 60 districts. Some 14,000 pupils were enrolled as of last 1989. The two major professional groups in the filed differ on the extent to which Montessori methods should be adapted to today's society, and dozens of different associations provide teacher training. Association leaders say they are working separately and together to promote the movement's spread into the public sector. But they concede that their efforts are relatively recent. The secret is based on the work of Maria Montessori, an Italian physician and biologist born in 1870 who first worked with children labeled and retarded and then with the children of poor families in inner-city Rome. Her children learn best in environments that respect and support their individual development. Maintaining that children's first six years are the most critical for learning, Montessori promoted a holistic approach that would begin children's education at an early age. In the eighties, the emphasis on early childhood education and the emergence of the school choice movement have further bolstered the popularity of Montessori ideas among school-savvy parents. The American Montessori Society (AMS) represents more than 700 schools. The U.S. branch of the Association Montessori Internationale (AMI) represents 130 schools. While only about two dozen public schools are officially recognized by either the AMS or the AMI, many public school teachers have been trained in programs accredited by those groups.

Language: English

ISSN: 0013-127X

Article

The Movement (?): Speculation on Public Montessori Programs and the Potential of this Publication

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 1, no. 1

Pages: 1, 7

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

In the Public Eye: Excerpts from a Research Paper on the Implementation of Public Montessori Programs

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 6, no. 2

Pages: 9

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

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