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599 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Influences of Multisensory Experience on Subsequent Unisensory Processing

Available from: University of California eScholarship

Publication: Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 2

Pages: Article 264

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Abstract/Notes: Multisensory perception has been the focus of intense investigation in recent years. It is now well-established that crossmodal interactions are ubiquitous in perceptual processing and endow the system with improved precision, accuracy, processing speed, etc. While these findings have shed much light on principles and mechanisms of perception, ultimately it is not very surprising that multiple sources of information provides benefits in performance compared to a single source of information. Here, we argue that the more surprising recent findings are those showing that multisensory experience also influences the subsequent unisensory processing. For example, exposure to auditory-visual stimuli can change the way that auditory or visual stimuli are processed subsequently even in isolation. We review three sets of findings that represent three different types of learning ranging from perceptual learning, to sensory recalibration, to associative learning. In all these cases exposure to multisensory stimuli profoundly influences the subsequent unisensory processing. This diversity of phenomena may suggest that continuous modification of unisensory representations by multisensory relationships may be a general learning strategy employed by the brain.

Language: English

DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2011.00264

ISSN: 1664-1078

Article

When Sensory Sensitivity Requires Intervention: Assessment and Treatment of Sensory-sensitive Children

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 29, no. 3

Pages: 38-43

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Abstract/Notes: In other words, observers must look at the sensory stimuli in a given environment at the time a behavior occurs (Williamson & Anzalone, 2001). [...]diagnosis requires extensive observation of a child across multiple environments over time. Over time and with frequent reinforcement, a child can demonstrate growth in a range of areas and behaviors as a result of a successful course of therapy; for example, a child experiencing numerous hypersensitivities might show improvements in motor planning, more participation in activities with peers, more flexibility in eating a variety of foods, and/or less fear related to gross-motor activities (Schaaf & Nightlinger, 2007). If these techniques are utilized consistently, OTs believe student behaviors and performance can improve in many concrete, measurable areas, ranging from general attention, focus, and behavior to self-calming, quality of academic work, fine-motor skills (including handwriting), and memory retention. [...]OTs also emphasize the importance of consistent, ongoing communication between therapists, parents, and teachers of children who are receiving SI therapy, in order to maximize the benefit of therapy and provide reinforcement of therapy techniques across a child's daily environments.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Supporting Sensory-Sensitive Children in a Sensory-Intensive World

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 29, no. 1

Pages: 34-39

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, Sensory disorders in children, Sensory integration dysfunction in children

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Abstract/Notes: For American children with educational challenges, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (or DSM-5) (American Psychiatric Association, 2013), is critically important because inclusion of a disorder in the DSM-5 allows for treatment and support to be paid for by the child's public school district if it interferes with his or her educational achievement. Early parent observation of sensory differences is often a child's first reported sign of autism, occurring as early as 9-12 months of age (Murray-Slutsky & Paris, 2000; Baranek, 2002). * Sensory profiles can distinguish among children with autism, children with ADHD, and children without those diagnoses (Tomchek & Dunn, 2007; Yochman, Parush, & Ornoy, 2004). * Well-developed sensory integration has strong correlation with academic achievement and cognitive processing. Early detection and management of sensory challenges can tie to predicting later academic performance deficits (Parham, 1998; Koenig & Rudney, 2010). * In a review of studies examining links between SI and ADHD, sensory-motor abilities of children with ADHD were lower than those of a control group. Other literature examines connections with disorders ranging from fragile X syndrome, mood disorders, behavioral disorders, and nonverbal learning disabilities (NVLD) to physically based conditions, such as premature birth, prenatal drug exposure, cerebral palsy/spina bifida/ Down syndrome, language delay, and other learning disabilities, as well as environmentally caused deficits, including abuse, neglect, or trauma.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

The Effects of the Montessori Sensory Education on Sensory Ability Development of the Children with Disability / 몬테소리 감각 교육이 장애아의 지각 향상에 미치는 영향

Publication: 韓國肢體不自由兒敎育學會誌 重複·肢體不自由兒敎育 / Korean Journal of Physical and Multiple Disabilities, vol. 40

Pages: 213-231

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Language: Korean

ISSN: 1226-8836

Master's Thesis (M.S. Ed.)

Including Sensory Integration Materials in a Montessori Classroom to Improve Behavior Outcomes

Available from: American Montessori Society

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Abstract/Notes: The Montessori Children’s House includes a variety of materials to meet the many different needs of children in the classroom. However, some children exhibit challenging behaviors in the classroom that make it difficult for them to attend to and complete work. These behaviors also disrupt the other children that are working and engaged in the classroom. The child who exhibits challenging behavior requires extra attention from the teacher, making it difficult for him/her to be independent and develop positive peer relationships. Sensory integration was defined by Jean Ayres as “the neurological process that organizes sensation from one’s own body and from the environment and makes it possible to use the body effectively within the environment” (Ayres 1972, p. 11). Research has shown that sensory integration materials such as fidgets, mouth tools, rocking and bouncing tools, and noise blocking headphones help to calm children and improve focus in classrooms. In this case study of two children within a classroom of 25, we measured undesirable behaviors before and after the introduction of sensory integration materials. We also tracked the usage of the sensory integration materials by all of the children in the classroom. The data collected showed that over a period of seven weeks, the inclusion of these materials produced a slight improvement in behaviors of the two children in the case study. The study also showed that children in the classroom regularly utilized the sensory integration materials to help them focus on work in the classroom. While future study can expand on this work, based on the findings of the introductory research presented here, including sensory integration materials in the Montessori Children’s House can reduce challenging behaviors and help children self-regulate so that they can better focus on classroom work.

Language: English

Published: River Falls, Wisconsin, 2018

Article

Sensory Integration in a Montessori Context

Publication: Montessori International, vol. 82

Pages: 36–38

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Abstract/Notes: summary of talk by JoAnn Granke at NAMTA conference, October, 2006

Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

Article

Sensory Integration and Contact with Nature: Designing Outdoor Inclusive Environments

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 34, no. 2

Pages: 159–177

North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Abstract/Notes: Includes specific design recommendations

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Doors of Perception: Sensory Integration for Montessori Classrooms

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 32, no. 1

Pages: 231–243

North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Sensory Integration: How Sensation Becomes Perception

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 6, no. 3

Pages: 27–28

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

An Exploration of the Use of Sensory Integration in the Montessori Context

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 32, no. 1

Pages: 219–230

North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

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