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518 results

Article

Social Justice Education in an Urban Charter Montessori School

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 2, no. 2

Pages: 1-14

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Public Montessori, Social justice education, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: As the Montessori Method continues its expansion in public education, a social justice lens is needed to analyze its contributions and limitations, given the increase in racial and socioeconomic diversity in the United States. Furthermore, much of the work in Social Justice Education (SJE) focuses on classroom techniques and curriculum, overlooking the essential work of school administrators and parents, whose work significantly influences the school community. The current study applied an SJE framework to the efforts of one urban, socioeconomically and racially integrated Montessori charter school. We examined the extent to which SJE principles were incorporated across the school community, using an inductive, qualitative, case-study approach that included meetings, surveys, focus groups, and interviews. Administrators quickly adopted a system-wide approach, but parents—often color-blind or minimizing of the relevance of race—consistently resisted. Study results imply a continued need for an institutional approach, not solely a classroom or curricular focus, when integrating social justice into Montessori schools.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v2i2.5066

ISSN: 2378-3923

Doctoral Dissertation

Montessori Education in Aotearoa-New Zealand: A Framework for Peace and Social Justice

Available from: Auckland University of Technology Library

Australasia, Australia and New Zealand, Montessori method of education, New Zealand, Oceania, Peace, Peace education, Social justice

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Abstract/Notes: In the first half of the 20th century, Maria Montessori (1870-1952) created a radical approach to early education that she believed had the potential to aid political and socio-cultural transformation on a global scale. This study utilises critical theory and insights from the reconceptualist early childhood education movement to contextualise the background and examine the currency of Montessori’s vision of social justice for the child and subsequent world peace. The research focuses on the reflections of graduates from the Bachelor of Education (Montessori Early Childhood Teaching), a model of teacher education developed at the Auckland University of Technology. The study utilised socio-biographical inquiry and case study as key research tools. Participants were drawn from graduates in their first, second and third year of early childhood teaching practice. The specialty degree aims to highlight the social advocacy role of Maria Montessori with regard to children’s rights and as teachers qualify and enter the field, the project explores differences and similarities that they meet in the interpretation of Montessori philosophy. Information was also sought on the factors that support or challenge the development and resilience of teachers during their first three years of practice in the field. In particular, the study considers the relationship between the philosophy and practice of Montessori teachers in Aotearoa-New Zealand with reference to Montessori’s vision and explores how a teacher preparation model can be authentically reconciled with a social justice perspective. Case studies in four early childhood centres exemplify how a framework derived from Montessori philosophy supports development of the ‘just community’. This research has yielded information on the development of effective practice in early childhood education using the construct of critically engaged pedagogy. Insights arising from the project may therefore contribute to advancing both the literature and practice of Montessori education and especially in the New Zealand teacher education context.

Language: English

Published: Auckland, New Zealand, 2011

Doctoral Dissertation

Uncovering Meaning in Montessori Teachers’ Lived Experiences of Cosmic Education as a Tool for Social Justice

Available from: Stephen F. Austin State University

Cosmic education, Social justice

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Abstract/Notes: This inquiry focused on the lived experiences of Montessori teachers in implementing Montessori’s Cosmic Education as a tool for social justice in their classrooms in order to more fully understand Cosmic Education’s meaning, purpose, and practice. The researcher also sought to understand how Cosmic Education could be an effective pedagogy of place, providing historical and social contexts in which students may develop and grow. The study used a post-intentional phenomenological design (Vagle, 2014), and was based on a series of interviews with five Montessori teachers from different classroom age levels. The data were analyzed using poetic inquiry through the form of found poetry. Emerging themes of Cosmic Education as a pedagogy of place and how that pedagogy of place contributed to agency in social justice were identified.

Language: English

Published: Nacogdoches, Texas, 2017

Book

Montessori Collaborative World Review: The Montessori Roots of Social Justice

Available from: Montessori Norge

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Abstract/Notes: Issues of social justice are not new. The struggles of marginalized humans are deeply rooted in beliefs and actions of our past that remain in our present and that have all the signs of carrying on into our future. One might think that we have evolved; that these deep roots have been upended and progress has been made. The conversations, discimination, and violence that exist suggest that very little progress has been made. We are at a critical point in addressing the challenges that our fellow human beings not only experience but that will also become a part of the fabric of who they are and will be carried on into future relationships and generations only to repress the quality of their one life lived. As we prepared to come together to celebrate 150 years of Dr. Maria Montessori's life and legacy - she was born on August 31, 1870 - we felt it was imperative that we honor her not only as the extraordinary educator and scientist that she was but also as a champion of humanitarian causes. This publication serves as a means for amplifying our voice and shines a spotlight on social justice, or rather injustice, for those within our community and beyond. We are grateful that we were joined in this effort by others who feel this same calling, and that we were led by David Kahn, as executive editor, through his inspiration, dedication to authenticity, and simply his ability to get things done. Our hope is that this publication will not be one that merely sits on a shelf but rather lives on through inspired action.

Language: English

Published: [S.I.]: [s.n.], 2019

Volume: 1, no. 1

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Impact of a Social Justice-Oriented Mindfulness Practice on the Self-Efficacy of an Early Childhood Montessori Teacher

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this action research was to explore how a social justice-oriented mindfulness practice would impact the self-efficacy of an early childhood educator. This self-study, with the researcher as the sole participant, took place over a six-week period while the researcher was working in a private Montessori school in the Northeastern United States in a classroom of 20 students aged 3-5. The intervention included breathwork; both walking and seated meditation paired with articles, essays, interviews, and poetry relevant to social justice; meditation; and mindfulness. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected through reflective journaling, a record of feelings scale, an attitude scale, and a pre- and post-intervention survey. While the data did not reflect any substantial impact with regards to teacher self-efficacy, the study was transformative in many ways. The intervention resulted in a deeper understanding of social inequities and a heightened sense of self-reflection. A more focused and comprehensive selection of content relevant to equity in the educational setting would likely have allowed for a more guided learning experience. Additionally, community organized events and workshops relevant to this work could play a crucial role in encouraging the need and responsibility to take action in establishing more equitable schools.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2020

Article

Establishing Social Justice Through Peace

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 20, no. 3

Pages: 12-13

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Peace and Social Justice Retreat: The Journey from Trauma to Triumph

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 20, no. 4

Pages: 12

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

'Where Do I Go From Here?': A Montessori Teacher's Reflection on the 2017 Montessori for Social Justice Conference

Available from: MontessoriPublic

Publication: Montessori Public, vol. 2, no. 1

Pages: 18

Public Montessori, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

Article

Montessori for Social Justice in Portland

Available from: MontessoriPublic

Publication: Montessori Public, vol. 4, no. 1

Pages: 22

Public Montessori, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

Article

Community Action Plans for Social Justice Advocacy: Leveraging the Relationship Between Awareness and Action

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: TESOL Journal, vol. 11, no. 4

Pages: e552

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Abstract/Notes: Supporting multilingual learners’ access to equitable and socially just language education requires more from teachers than a critical stance and language awareness. Teachers of multilingual students must understand how their awareness and ideologies drive their actions and how their actions can generate new awareness both inside the classroom in pedagogical choices and outside the classroom in interactions with families and community partners. To aid teachers in moving through cycles of applying awareness to action, the authors designed the Community Action Plan (CAP) assignment for a family and community engagement course. This article outlines the components of the course curriculum and the conceptual framework that guided its design. The authors also provide a case study of how one novice teacher, Katrina (co-author), navigated the curriculum. They offer suggestions for how language teacher educators might guide in-service and preservice teachers to implement CAPs of various types to promote socially just language education for and with K–12 learners.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1002/tesj.552

ISSN: 1949-3533

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