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573 results

Article

The Stages of Development in Teachers

Publication: The Alcove: Newsletter of the Australian AMI Alumni Association, no. 9

Pages: 2

Montessori method of education - Teachers, Teachers

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Abstract/Notes: Part 2 of 2. Reprinted from NAMTA's Whole-School Montessori Handbook.

Language: English

Article

De vier opvoedingsstadiën [The four stages of development]

Available from: Delpher - Nationale Bibliotheek van Nederland

Publication: Het Kind, vol. 39, no. 21

Pages: 394-396

Maria Montessori - Writings, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: Dutch

Article

Sensitive Periods as Stages of Development

Publication: Montessori Kyōiku [Montessori Education], no. 24

Pages: 8-13

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Language: Japanese

ISSN: 0913-4220

Article

The Stages of Development in Teachers

Publication: The Alcove: Newsletter of the Australian AMI Alumni Association, no. 8

Pages: 2–3

Montessori method of education - Teachers, Teachers

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Abstract/Notes: Part 1 of 2; reprinted from NAMTA's Whole-School Montessori Handbook

Language: English

Article

The Stages of Development in Teachers

Publication: Montessori Articles (Montessori Australia Foundation)

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation

The Developmental Psychology of Maria Montessori (Italy)

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori is historically recognized for her contributions to early education. Her primary recognition derived from the comprehensive educational program which became known as the Montessori Method. Relatively little attention has focused on her background as physician, psychiatrist, and pedagogical psychologist, from which she developed a body of psychological knowledge which established the foundation of the well-known Method. Her pedagogical psychology was overshadowed by her pedagogical theory despite her secure position in the history of child psychiatry. Also contributing to the non-acceptance of Montessori's psychology was the psychological tenor of the times. In the forefront of the psychological movement in the early 1900's were psychometric testing, Freud's psycho-sexual stages, Thorndike's stimulus-response theory, and the emergence of behaviorism under the leadership of Watson, to name a few. This climate was not hospitable to Montessori's developmental-interactionist theory. In the 1960's through the research findings of psychologists and the availability of Federal funds to compensate the "cumulative deficits" of the disadvantaged child, interest was focused on early childhood education and consequently the Montessori Method. As psychologists embraced Piaget's developmental theory, resemblances in thinking between Piaget and Montessori were noted. While psychologists pointed to Montessori's developmental-interactionist ideas, nobody attempted to elaborate her developmental theory in toto. This study attempts to do so. For Montessori, the development of the child takes place in successive and qualitatively different stages, with each stage providing the foundation for succeeding stages. Within this framework, she clearly delineates cognitive, motor, language, socialization, personality, and character as developing through stages. Cognitive structures develop through the child's interaction with, and actions upon, objects in the environment. A thorough examination of her theory leaves no doubt that Montessori is a cognitive developmentalist. While at times she appears nativistic, and at other times an extreme environmentalist, her position on development is interactionist and constructivist. Montessori is historically recognized for her contributions to early education. Her primary recognition derived from the comprehensive educational program which became known as the Montessori Method. Relatively little attention has focused on her background as physician, psychiatrist, and pedagogical psychologist, from which she developed a body of psychological knowledge which established the foundation of the well-known Method. Her pedagogical psychology was overshadowed by her pedagogical theory despite her secure position in the history of child psychiatry. Also contributing to the non-acceptance of Montessori's psychology was the psychological tenor of the times. In the forefront of the psychological movement in the early 1900's were psychometric testing, Freud's psycho-sexual stages, Thorndike's stimulus-response theory, and the emergence of behaviorism under the leadership of Watson, to name a few. This climate was not hospitable to Montessori's developmental-interactionist theory. In the 1960's through the research findings of psychologists and the availability of Federal funds to compensate the "cumulative deficits" of the disadvantaged child, interest was focused on early childhood education and consequently the Montessori Method. As psychologists embraced Piaget's developmental theory, resemblances in thinking between Piaget and Montessori were noted. While psychologists pointed to Montessori's developmental-interactionist ideas, nobody attempted to elaborate her developmental theory in toto. This study attempts to do so. For Montessori, the development of the child takes place in successive and qualitatively different stages, with each stage providing the foundation for succeeding stages. Within this framework, she clearly delineates cognitive, motor, language, socialization, personality, and character as developing through stages. Cognitive structures develop through the child's interaction with, and actions upon, objects in the environment. A thorough examination of her theory leaves no doubt that Montessori is a cognitive developmentalist. While at times she appears nativistic, and at other times an extreme environmentalist, her position on development is interactionist and constructivist. In contemporary terms her "psychopedagogy" would be considered an action psychology, which basically precludes it from academic "respectibility". Her theory contains both strengths and weaknesses in light of present-day thinking; however, on balance, Montessori's theory is quite contemporary and remarkably ahead of most of the psychological thinking of her time.

Language: English

Published: New York, 1982

Conference Paper

Multistructural Model of Speech and Language Development in Montessori Pedagogy

Available from: ICLEL

2nd International Conference on Lifelong Education and Leadership for ALL-ICLEL 2016

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Abstract/Notes: The goal of the article is to provide theoretical justification of the speech and language development multistructural model, analyse speech therapists’ opinion about the significance of various language development preconditions in the child’s speech and language development, as well as justify application options of the multistructural model in the Montessori pedagogy aspect. In Latvia every second or third pre-school aged child has insufficient or impaired speech and language development. Assessing the child’s language development, it has to be taken into account how it is influenced by the combination of different endogenous and exogenous factors, which lie into a diverse mutual interaction. The interaction model of factors in each individual case is different and it determines the individual character of the child’s language development process. The speech or language impairment is not quite often the leading (primary) symptom, but as a part of an illness, specific psychological or socially economic condition and is considered as a secondary phenomenon. In order to state all possible causes of the language development delay or impairment, their possible interaction and to work out an appropriate correction and development plan, the peculiarities of the speech and language development multistructural model of each individual case have to be found out. Understanding the reasons of the insufficient language development or impairment and their elimination, reduction or compensation guarantees a more efficient pedagogic or speech therapy correction process. However, teachers or speech therapists do not always observe it in their professional work, as still the main attention is being paid to the expressions of development insufficiency or impairment and not to the causal identification and decrease of their negative impact. Montessori pedagogy is as one of the methods, in which the holistic approach is implemented in the educational and also correction process, and thus also the speech and language development multistructural model.

Language: English

Published: Sakarya, Turkey: ICLEL Conferences, Sakarya University Faculty of Education, 2016

Pages: 429-437

ISBN: 978-605-66495-1-6

Article

Montessori Eğitiminin Çocukların Gelişimine Etkisinin İncelenmesi / Investigation of the Effects of Montessori Education on Children's Development

Available from: Academia

Publication: Hacettepe University Graduate School of Educational Sciences - The Journal of Educational Research, vol. 1, no. 1

Pages: 32-52

Asia, Middle East, Montessori method of education, Turkey, Western Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Bu araştırmada, Montessori yaklaşımı doğrultusunda gerçekleştirilen öğretmen eğitimi ve eğitim ortamınındüzenlenmesi sonucu üç, dört ve beş yaş (36-72 ay) grubundaki (deney ve kontrol grubu) çocuklara verilen Montessori yaklaşımına dayalı eğitimin çocukların gelişim alanları üzerindeki etkisini saptamakamaçlanmıştır. Araştırmada, Montessori yaklaşımına dayalı eğitimin çocukların gelişim alanlarına olanetkisini belirlemek amacıyla ön test ve son test kontrol gruplu deneysel desen kullanılmıştır. Ankara Üniversitesi Uygulama Anaokulu 1’e devam eden çocuklar deney grubunu, okul yöneticileri ile öğretmengörüşleri doğrultusunda benzer özelliklere sahip olduğu düşünülen bir üniversite anaokuluna devam edençocuklar ise kontrol grubunu oluşturmuştur. Araştırmada demografik verileri toplamak amacıyla “Genel BilgiFormu”, çocukların gelişim alanlarını değerlendirmek için Alpern (2007) tarafından geliştirilen Gelişimsel Profil 3 (GP3) ile Mardell ve Goldenberg (1998) tarafından geliştirilen Öğrenmenin Değerlendirilmesi için Gelişimsel Göstergeler 4 (ÖDGG-4) kullanılmıştır. Montessori yaklaşımına dayalı eğitim öncesinde ilkolarak Montessori eğitim ortamı oluşturulmuş ve gelişimsel değerlendirme labratuvarı hazır halegetirilmiştir. Ardından öğretmenler “Montessori Uygulayıcıların Eğitimi” kapsamında eğitim almışlardır.Çalışma sonucunda öğretmen görüşüne göre ÖDGG-4’den elde edilen bulgular incelendiğinde, deney vekontrol grubundaki çocukların öz bakım becerileri ile sosyal duygusal gelişim alt boyutu puanlarında, ebeveyn görüşlerine göre öz bakım becerileri alt boyutu ile toplam gelişim puanlarında deney grubu lehineanlamlı farklılık olduğu saptanmıştır. GP-3’e ait sonuçlar incelendiğinde de deney ve kontrol grubundakiçocukların öğretmen görüşlerine göre uyumsal davranış boyutunda; ebeveyn görüşlerine göre fizikselgelişim, bilişsel gelişim, iletişim alt boyutları ile toplam gelişim puanlarında deney grubu lehine anlamlıfarklılık olduğu belirlenmiştir. / The present study was aimed at determining the development levels of children aged three, four andfive (36-72 months) attending Ankara University Practice Preschool 1, and the effect of Montessorieducational approach on their areas of development. A pretest, posttest, retention test experimental designwith control group was adopted in the study to determine the effect of Montessori educational approach on children’s areas of development. The experimental group consisted of children attending Ankara University Practice Preschool 1, while the control group consisted of attending a randomly selected university preschool with similar qualifications. The General Information Form was used for data collection purposes,while the Developmental Profile 3 (DP-3) developed by Alpern (2007) and the Developmental Indicators forthe Assessment of Learning 4 (DIAL-4) developed by Mardell and Goldenberg (1998) whose validity and reliability studies were used as assessment tools to evaluate children’s areas of development. Prior to theimplementation of Montessori education, Montessori educational environment was prepared and adevelopmental assessment laboratory was set up. Thereafter, teachers received the MontessoriPractitioner Training. DIAL-4 results according to teachers’ opinions revealed significant differences between the children in experimental and control groups in self-help skills and social emotional development subscale scores, while according to parents’ opinions, there were significant differences in the self-help skills subcale and overall development scores. DP-3 results revealed significant differencesbetween the children in experimental and control groups in the adaptive behavior subscale according to teachers’ opinions, and physical development, cognitive development and communication subscale scores,as well as, overall development scores of the DP-3 according to parents’ opinions.

Language: Turkish

Master's Thesis

Creative Nonfiction and the Montessori Method: Design Principles for Developmental Stages

Available from: Hollins University - Digital Commons

Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Stages of development

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Abstract/Notes: This thesis essay looks at the genre of creative nonfiction in children’s picture books to find literary and design elements that are utilized in award winning books and how those components transfer to the first three planes of development in the Montessori method of education. The three creative works of the thesis, Under the Surface: A Sea Mammal’s Day, Dive into a Kelp Forest, and Reef are picture books with an environmental, ocean theme. Each book corresponds with one of the first three planes of development put forth by Maria Montessori in her philosophy of education. Analysis of these works show how literary and aesthetic devices, as evidenced in award winning genre picture books, pertain to and contribute to the sensitive periods of learning for each plane and its corresponding age group.

Language: English

Published: Roanoke, Virginia, 2022

Article

Historical View of the Planes of Development as Developmental Outcomes

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 34, no. 1

Pages: 43-54

Planes of development, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

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