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418 results

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Impact of Creative Movement Presentations on Dance Participation and Student Attitudes Towards Dance in a Montessori Early Childhood Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Lower elementary, Montessori method of education, Movement education

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Abstract/Notes: This action research study examined the impact of creative movement presentations on dance participation and student attitudes towards dance in one outdoor Montessori early childhood classroom during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants were 13 kindergarten and lower elementary students, ages 5-8, and the researcher, their teacher. Students were presented creative movement activities eight times during circle time over four weeks. They were also given opportunities to dance freely once a week for six weeks and asked three times to respond to statements regarding their attitudes towards dance; pre-intervention, mid-intervention, and post-intervention. Data was collected using observations of dance participation, field notes about circle time presentations, and student self-assessment regarding their attitudes towards dance. There was some improvement in attitudes towards dance and an increase in dance participation. Many children expressed enjoyment and the researcher felt inclined to continue providing free dance opportunities and creative movement presentations at circle. The researcher encourages other educators to incorporate dance opportunities in class free time and curriculum lessons.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2021

Report

Attitudes toward Multiple Aged Classrooms of Third, Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Grade Students

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: This study investigated students' attitudes toward multi-age classrooms, specifically examining differences in attitudes based on gender and grade level. The Multiage Attitude Survey was administered at the end of the school year to students in two multi-age classrooms: one classroom with 11 third-grade and 10 fourth-grade students, the other with 11 fifth-grade and 13 sixth-grade students. Results revealed no significant difference in attitudes based on gender. However, differences were found in grade level attitudes. Correlations between grade level and negative attitudes toward multi-age classrooms indicated that the higher grade-level students (fourth graders and sixth graders) had more negative attitudes toward the multiple groupings than did younger students in each classroom.

Language: English

Published: [S.I.], 1993

Doctoral Dissertation (Ed.D.)

Teacher Beliefs, Attitudes, and Expectations Towards Students with Attention Disorders in Three Schools in the United Kingdom's Independent School System

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, Attention-deficit-disordered children, Children with disabilities, England, Europe, Inclusive education, Northern Europe, Northern Ireland, Perceptions, Scotland, Teachers - Attitudes, United Kingdom

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Abstract/Notes: Scope and method of study. The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate the connection between the beliefs, attitudes, and expectations teachers exhibit towards students who have attention challenges in three independent schools in England and the pathognomonic-interventionist continuum as identified by Jordan-Wilson and Silverman (1991), which identifies, along a scale, where teachers' beliefs lie. Teachers' sense of efficacy as they meet individual student needs was also explored as was what educators in these schools, who have limited, if any, recourse to special education assistance, do to support students who display the characteristics of attention deficit. The pathognomonic-interventionist continuum and Bandura's (1977) construct of self-efficacy were the lenses used to focus the research. The study records participants' responses and reflections about the phenomenon under study, describing what it is they do, how they perceive their responsibility towards their students, and how they support each other. Findings and conclusions. Data compiled from a sample of 10 teachers and 3 head-teachers, were disaggregated to provide a picture of how participant teachers work with attentionally challenged children in selected English independent schools. The results provide evidence that teachers whose profile identifies them with the interventionist perspective present stronger senses of self-efficacy. They are prepared to undertake prereferral-type activities to determine where the student is experiencing difficulty and are then willing to manipulate the learning environment to meet individual student needs. Teachers in these schools perceive it as their professional obligation to design teaching scenarios to benefit all students. Teacher efficacy, their sense of their ability to positively influence their students' educational performance and achievement, is unrelated to years of experience or educational background, but is related to the beliefs which they hold.

Language: English

Published: Stillwater, Oklahoma, 2006

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Self-Determination Theory on Montessori Kindergarten Student’s Math Knowledge and Attitudes

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Self-determination, Self-determination theory

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Abstract/Notes: This action research examined how fostering student autonomy, competence, and relatedness as described in Self-determination Theory (SDT) improved the Montessori kindergarten student’s motivation to choose work from the math curriculum? By increasing the kindergarten student’s knowledge of the Montessori math curriculum sequence, an attempt was made to increase their autonomy, competence and relatedness as it pertains to choosing math work. The data collection consisted of a student survey and questionaire that was administered before and after the introduction of the action research interventions. Teacher observations were also helpful when determining if students were choosing math works at a higher rate. This research found that introducing kindergarten students to the sequence of Montessori math work improved their knowledge of and attitude towards the Montessori math curiculum.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2013

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Impact of Student-Driven Mathematical Assessment on Learning Behaviors in Sixth Grade Students

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, Public Montessori, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This seven-week study explored the impact of student-self assessment on learning and engagement behaviors of 48 sixth graders during math classes in a public school setting. Data collection tools such as student surveys, pre-and post -self-assessments, observations, reflections, and teacher- student conferencing provided the information to inform the conclusions regarding self-efficacy. Observation confirmed that a student’s participation in using self-evaluation to contribute to their learning affected internal processes such as motivation and engagement. Assessment activities that provided evidence and feedback to inform goals specific to skill development and learner traits yielded significant results. Highly structured assessment tools and classroom routines reduced students' reliance on the teacher to interpret and use individual performance data. The use of formative assessment practices that promoted goal setting, self-assessment and self-determination practices improved engagement and learning behaviors in the classroom.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2022

Doctoral Dissertation

A Comparison of Student Achievement, Student Self-Concept, and Parental Attitude Toward Traditional and Montessori Programs in a Public School Setting

Available from: University of North Texas Digital Library

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Abstract/Notes: This study investigates differences in academic achievement and self-concept of students enrolled in a traditional public school program and a public school Montessori program. The attitudes of parents of students are also compared. The population includes 182 experimental and control kindergarten, first-, second-, and third-grade students in a Texas metropolitan school district. Academic pretest and posttest data include scores on the Bilingual Syntax Measure, Metropolitan Readiness Tests, California Achievement Tests, and the Iowa Test of Basic Skills. The McDaniel-Piers Young Children's Self Concept Scale and the Parent Opinion Survey were also administered. A two-way analysis of covariance was used to analyze pretest and posttest academic achievement and self-concept scores, and to test for possible interaction between the programs and the sex variable. The pretest score was used as the covariate. The means of both parent groups were analyzed using the t test for two independent samples. The .05 level of significance was used to test each hypothesis. First-grade traditional students had significantly higher academic achievement scores than first-grade Montessori students. A significant interaction effect at the first-grade level revealed that traditional males had the highest adjusted mean score for academic achievement and Montessori males had the lowest adjusted mean score. Second-grade traditional students showed a significant increase over second-grade Montessori students in self-concept. No significant difference was found in the attitude of parents of students enrolled in both programs. Conclusions based on this investigation are that more similarities than differences are evident between the two programs, differences in academic achievement and interaction effects and sex appeared at only one grade level, differences in self-concept appeared at only one grade level, and parent attitudes are similar. Recommendations include continuation of the Montessori program evaluation and replication using a larger population, different grade levels, and different socioeconomic levels.

Language: English

Published: Denton, Texas, 1982

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Peer Collaboration on Students’ Writing Skills and Their Attitude Towards Writing in a Hybrid Montessori Classroom of Second and Third Grade Students

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Lower elementary, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this technology-integrated research is to understand the effects peer collaboration has on students writing skills on 2nd and 3rd graders in a virtual setting. The research took place over five weeks in a lower elementary classroom in a private Montessori school in New England area. The population included 18 students ages 8 to 9. Students participated in a 5-week intervention process, working in groups of 3 on peer collaboration, sharing ideas, and creating group written work. The findings indicate an overall beneficial effect on children’s attitude towards writing, leading to better writing skills and communication skills. Collaborative writing in a technology-integrated platform positively impacted students’ typing skills. Continued research is necessary to assess additional domains such as cognitive improvement, vocabulary effects, and students’ specific writing skills.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2021

Article

What Happens After Montessori? What Parents, Students, and Teachers Believe About the Success of Former Montessori Elementary Students in Junior High School

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 10, no. 4

Pages: 45–47

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Materials for Older Students: Teen-Aged Students Succeed Using Montessori Methods

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 8, no. 2

Pages: 12-13

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Student Adjustment to Higher Education: The Role of Alternative Educational Pathways in Coping with the Demands of Student Life

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: Higher Education, vol. 59, no. 3

Pages: 353-366

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Abstract/Notes: The present longitudinal study measured student adjustment to higher education, comparing 50 participants from alternative schools (Steiner, Montessori, New Schools) with 80 students from the traditional school system. We hypothesized that students from alternative schools adapt better, because of greater perceived social support, academic self-efficacy, and task-oriented coping styles. Measures were taken during the last school year (baseline characteristics), and at the beginning of the first and last terms of the first year in higher education. The quality of adjustment was assessed through academic results, and physical and psychological well-being. The following instruments were used: the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory by Spielberger (1983), the 13-items Depression Inventory by Beck et al. (1961), the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations by Endler and Parker (1990), and semi-directed interviews. Results show that students from alternative schools adjust better to higher education: they report less anxiety and depression symptoms, and show greater life satisfaction and academic achievement.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s10734-009-9252-7

ISSN: 1573-174X

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