Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

1004 results

Article

Design and Validation of Learning Sequences of PGSD Sanata Dharma University Student to Teach the Fraction Concept for Primary Student Using Montessori Manipulatives

Available from: Institute of Physics

Publication: Journal of Physics: Conference Series, vol. 1470

Pages: 012083

Asia, Australasia, Efficacy, Indonesia, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Southeast Asia

See More

Abstract/Notes: Fraction concept is one of the learning problems that often occurs in elementary students. Elementary student’s misconceptions can be caused by teacher’s misconceptions. PGSD students are teacher candidates, so they must have the correct concept then they can teach the concept of fractions correctly too. Learning must be an inspiration for students when they become teachers later. One medium that can be used to teach fraction concepts is media based on Montessori. Local culture can support the use of Montessori media. This study aims to design and validate the learning sequence of PGSD Students in using Montessori media, to develop design principles to teach fraction concepts in elementary school students. The approach in this research is design research which includes three phases, namely design, trial and assessment. In the design phase, researchers formulate students’ prior knowledge and learning objectives. This is used as the basis for the sequence of learning. This stage of learning is evaluated in a repeat trial phases, the hypothesis design principle is developed and from which the learning stages are redesigned. The results of the assessment phase, together with the experience of the previous cycle and research review, are used to perfect the design principles of the student’s learning sequences so they can teach the concept of fractions correctly. From: The 7th South East Asia Design Research International Conference (SEADRIC 2019) 25-27 July 2019, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Language: English

DOI: 10.1088/1742-6596/1470/1/012083

ISSN: 1742-6596

Conference Paper

mLearning in Primary Education: An Online Teacher Training Proposal Based on Montessori Education Principles

Available from: IATED Digital Library

12th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies

See More

Abstract/Notes: Mlearning is learning through digital mobile environments, making it possible to acquire, interrelate and share new knowledge through mobile devices. There is a consensus on the growth of the use of these devices for different educational actions. According to Sarrab, Elgamel & Aldabbas (2012), there are different recreational and pedagogical uses based on mlearning. According to De Araújo Junior et al (2019), these uses are based on the possibility of combining more than one methodology and learning strategies in line with students’ learning characteristics and needs. To this end, mlearning seeks to integrate learning theories, especially constructivist and behavioral theories to also create collaborative working environments (Crompton, Burke & Gregory, 2017). The greatest advantage of mlearning is the possibility of it being applied pedagogically beyond the school environment, with the participation of families and with various proposals for interaction between teacher-student, student-student, and teacher-student-families. This whole range of possibilities has created a new field of study. By overcoming the design approach on mlearning environments and their different effects (Devinder Singh & Zaitun, 2006), a new line of research is becoming relevant: the role of teachers and their training in the use of this technology. Sanchez-Prieto & Hernández García (2019) point out that despite its advantages, the number of teachers using this technology is still very limited. A bibliographic review of 7 scientific articles related to the use of mlearning in primary classes within different educational contexts identified that teachers still lack, not only technical and/or pedagogical but also comprehensive training, making it difficult for them to become familiar with this technology and applying it as another teaching tool in their primary classes. Considering the needs found regarding digital teacher competence, the basis of digital interaction between teacher-student-families and the assessment, selection, and design of didactic contents, this study is an integral part of the Koulu I +D project (Mobile learning in primary education) number ID19-XX-003, aims to present a proposal for teacher training taught within an online learning environment. It does so regarding the basis, application and use of mlearning in primary classes based on the principles of Montessori education: personal choice of the student, collaborative learning, self-direction, the teacher as a guide and learning by discovery. To this end, the training model is based on these points to guide the work using mlearning by considering the characteristics and needs of primary education, regardless of the tool’s typology. The training proposal is based on providing the necessary teaching knowledge to conduct the pedagogical work at the comprehension, application and assessment levels of mlearning in primary classes. The training was designed as an online format to overcome the first barrier for some teachers: the use of technology. The defined points of training to meet the demands of the application in primary classes are: Digital teacher competence, Montessori and Mlearning Pedagogy, Pedagogical tools and the possibilities of primary education and mlearning Assessment in primary education.

Language: English

Published: Online Conference: International Academy of Technology, Education and Development (IATED), 2020

Pages: 7979-7983

DOI: 10.21125/edulearn.2020.2004

ISBN: 978-84-09-17979-4

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Creating Self-Assessed Work Portfolios on Student Learning Engagement in an Upper Elementary Montessori Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Upper elementary

See More

Abstract/Notes: The purpose of the research was to find whether the creation of self-assessed student work portfolios would be effective in engaging students in learning opportunities and lead to self-regulated behaviors. The research project was conducted in an upper elementary classroom. The class consists of twenty-three grade four to grade six Montessori students in a private school. Ten students have had a Montessori education starting in preschool, eight students started in grade three, two were held back a year, two students started in grade four, and two students started in grade six. Fifty-two percent of the class has a form of learning difference; prominently dyslexia. Three students are on the Autism spectrum. The sources of data used in this research included observation forms, self-assessment forms, journal prompts, teacher reflection journal, and student-teacher interviews. The results indicated an increase in engagement in learning and self-regulated behaviors. This was equally evident in the students with different learning needs. Implications are that empowering students with self-assessment and choices of work improves work habits and leads to better quality of learning outcomes and engagement. Students improved the most when they combined their self-assessment with peer feedback and were given direct responsibility for the creation of their own portfolio.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2014

Article

Open for Business: Learning Economics Through Social Interaction in a Student-Operated Store

Publication: Journal of Social Studies Research, vol. 35, no. 1

Pages: 39-55

Americas, Business education, Economics education, North America, United States of America, ⛔ No DOI found

See More

Abstract/Notes: This study examines teaching and learning economics and entrepreneurship through a student-run Montessori middle school store. By designing and managing a school store, students created a 'community of practice' to learn economics concepts in their daily environment. Questions guiding this study were: (a) How do students' social-interactions in a Montessori middle school student-operated business demonstrate economics content knowledge? (b) How do students' social-interactions in a Montessori middle school student-operated business demonstrate economics skills? (c) How do students' business roles in the store develop their understanding of economics principles? Findings indicate that: (1) student activities in the school store promoted learning through social interaction; (2) the type and number of business roles a student assumed created opportunities for economic learning; (3) student entrepreneurs expressed specific knowledge of economics concepts, and, (4) students' decision-making and ownership affected behavior. Additionally, features of Kohlberg's (1985) concept of Just Community supported the learning environment. This study can provide social studies teachers and teacher-educators with a model for learning economics (or social studies) concepts through a curricular-based student-run enterprise.

Language: English

ISSN: 0885-985X, 2352-2798

Doctoral Dissertation

Improving Early Reading Skills of First-Grade Students with Learning Disabilities Using Montessori Learning Strategies

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, People with disabilities

See More

Abstract/Notes: This study focused on helping students with learning disabilities to improve their listening comprehension and acquire early reading skills of decoding, reading and understanding what a word and two- or -three-word phrases say. Since reading at the advanced stage involves comprehension of sentences and paragraphs, in this study, building the foundation of reading at the word level is the logical place to start. With that skill in place, combining words into a phrase and understanding what it means will be the next step. Meanwhile, helping the students understand what was read to them through questioning builds their listening comprehension skills, which will be a great help in reading comprehension once the students have advanced enough to read sentences and paragraphs. The target group used for this study included six 1st graders with learning disabilities, who had difficulties with reading and comprehending. These 1st graders with learning disabilities were not taught one-on-one due to large class size. They had no knowledge of phonics. They could not relate the sounds they heard to the letters of the alphabet. The curriculum-based assessment (CBA) model was the alternative assessment model that was used to assess the students. The 12-week intensive study focused on two variables: a dependent variable and an independent variable. The dependent variable was reading at the word and phrase level, and the independent variable was word sound, blending vowels, consonant blending, and consonant and vowel blending. The scientific methodology was the single subject model, a 1-minute assessment. Each student was assessed for 1 minute each day for 3 days. The results of the assessment were used to determine the baseline before the intervention implementation. This methodology is also known as "AB Design." AB refers to a two-phase design, the baseline phase and the intervention phase. The intervention phase was introduced after the baseline phase was established and recorded in data format. Intervention data were recorded as well. The data collected were graphed in two phases. The results showed that the students were able to learn how to read and acquire comprehension within the 12 weeks. The reading strategies that were used in this study were based on Montessori's methods, which is a methodology in learning how to decode words which leads to automatic reading. These strategies are being used in Montessori schools throughout Dade County public schools, but not particularly with special education students. The results of this study were positive.

Language: English

Published: Cincinnati, Ohio, 2003

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Effects of Grading on Student Learning and Alternative Assessment Strategies

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

See More

Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to investigate what effect an alternative assessment strategy would have on students’ engagement, motivation, and overall learning in an urban, private Montessori middle school program located in the Midwest. Two teachers and 13 students participated in two phases (one social studies and one science unit) over the course of six weeks. Teacher-assigned grades on class and homework were removed and replaced with student-determined final grades based on self-assessment using collaboratively created rubrics and individual portfolios. Students kept daily learning logs and completed a pre- and post-unit survey designed to measure their level of engagement, motivation, and learning preferences. The researcher kept daily observational notes as well as tallies of behavioral markers for engagement and disengagement. Students were also invited to give open-ended feedback about their experience at the end of the intervention. The results showed that while the alternative assessment model did not have a direct impact on students’ daily engagement or intrinsic motivation, it did increase students’ understanding of how their work correlated to a final grade in the unit, and it created opportunities for students to make connections to their learning and thus more actively plan their future work. Additionally, a direct correlation appeared between the level of student activity and student engagement in classes, indicating the importance of reducing passivity as much as possible in the daily learning process.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2017

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Behavioral Effects of Outdoor Learning on Primary Students

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

See More

Abstract/Notes: Children have an innate sense of curiosity about nature. “When children come in contact with nature, they reveal their strength” (Montessori, 1967, pg. 69) and therefore, outdoor education can be a useful learning tool for students. Whether being outdoors or bringing the nature-based activities inside, children have the opportunity to work with all of their senses. A growing number of schools around the United States have begun adding outdoor learning to their curriculum (Lieberman & Hoody, 1998) to bring a positive outcome to students’ behavior. Outdoor learning provides another environment that children can thrive in and hopefully benefit from. As many students struggle with learning confined to an indoor learning environment, like most classrooms, changing the environment offers students a uniquely rich context to frame student learning and provides them with movement, stimulation and grabs their attention so they can focus better (Bjorge, Hannah, Rekstad and Pauly, 2017). “If students are more focused, it is less likely for them to cause disruptive behaviors” (Bjorge, et. al, p. 4). This positive change in behavior is beneficial for everyone including students, teachers, and parents. By incorporating outdoor learning regularly in a classroom, children are given the freedom to move and explore on a sensorial level that may promote positive learning abilities. Using the outdoor environment as a classroom setting can have an impact on children who are not successful in an indoor classroom setting. According to existing research, (Bjorge, et. al, 2017; James, J.K. and Williams, T., 2017; Lieberman & Hoody, 1998) student motivation and concentration behaviors, as well as overall well-being, can be greatly impacted and improved through outdoor learning opportunities.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2019

Article

High Stakes Testing and Student Perspectives on Teaching and Learning in the Republic of Ireland

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: Educational Assessment, Evaluation and Accountability, vol. 24, no. 4

Pages: 283-306

Assessment, Europe, Ireland, Northern Europe, Perceptions

See More

Abstract/Notes: There is now a well developed literature on the impact of high stakes testing on teaching approaches and student outcomes. However, the student perspective has been neglected in much research. This article draws on a mixed method longitudinal study of secondary students in the Republic of Ireland to explore the impact of two sets of high stakes examinations on student experiences. The analyses are based on surveys completed by 897 lower secondary students and 748 upper secondary students, along with 47 lower secondary and 53 upper secondary group interviews with students. Findings show the presence of impending high stakes exams results in increased workload for students, with many reporting pressure and stress. Throughout their schooling career, students clearly favour active learning approaches. However, for some students, particularly high-aspiring middle-class students, these views change as they approach the terminal high stakes exam, with many showing a strong preference for a more narrowly focussed approach to exam preparation. This article highlights how students shift from a position of critiquing exam-focused teaching methods as inauthentic to accepting such methods as representing ‘good teaching’.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s11092-012-9154-6

ISSN: 1874-8600, 1874-8597

Doctoral Dissertation

A Comparison of Academic Achievement of Students Taught by the Montessori Method and by Traditional Methods of Instruction in the Elementary Grades

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

See More

Abstract/Notes: The problem of this study was to determine if there is a significant difference between the academic achievement scores of students in grades 2 through 5 who are taught with the Montessori method of instruction and those students who are taught with traditional methods of instruction in the Helena Public Schools. Analyses used a two-way ANOVA; method and gender as well as method and aptitude were examined. The level of significance was set at alpha =.05. A matching technique was used to match Montessori students with students from traditional classrooms by the independent variables of grade, aptitude, gender, socioeconomic conditions, and handicapping conditions. The study also examined if there was a significant difference between the aptitude of all students in Montessori classrooms and all students in traditional classrooms. The population studied was second, third, fourth, and fifth grade students during the spring of 1996. A total of 120 students was used in the study of academic achievement. There were 145 F-tests conducted in this study. At the second grade level, students from traditional classrooms scored significantly higher than students in Montessori classrooms in mathematics computation and mathematics concepts and applications. Also at the second grade, when aptitude was taken into consideration, Montessori low aptitude students scored significantly higher in vocabulary than low aptitude students in traditional classrooms. There were no significant findings in any of the subtests at the third and fourth grade levels. At the fifth grade level, Montessori students scored significantly higher in language expression and social studies. Interaction was found with aptitude in language expression and with gender in science. A comparison of the aptitude of all Montessori students to all students from traditional classrooms revealed that Montessori students scored significantly higher. The overall results of this study show that the Montessori method of instruction and the traditional method of instruction provide students with comparable achievement test scores. A longitudinal study is recommended to examine the long-term effects of academic achievement of those students taught by the Montessori method of instruction.

Language: English

Published: Bozeman, Montana, 1997

Doctoral Dissertation

The Potentiality of Play: The Shifting Design Language of Play-Based Learning

Available from: Edinburgh Napier University

Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Play, Student-centered learning

See More

Abstract/Notes: This thesis, underpinned by cross-cultural design ethnography (DE) and research through design (RtD), re-reads play-based learning constructs as design practice. In doing so, it charts the shifting relationship between design and theories of play-based learning. The work frames the design of play-based learning processes, from their emergence in historical learning environments such as the Montessori method to current pedagogies of STEAM learning. This evolutionary focus will be of interest to a wide range of stakeholders such as pedagogues, designers, and policy makers, each of whom contribute to where, what and how children are taught. This thesis presents the following arguments: Firstly, it frames and re-reads key historical play pedagogues as designers and design thinkers, whose work has shaped and influenced the evolution of play-based learning through the inception of play artefacts, spaces, and structures. This thesis further elucidates that design-thinking has been at the heart of play-based learning, demonstrated through the design of modular and standardised pedagogic objects and spaces of historic learning environments. The design evolution within this framework helps to enlighten the development of tinkering and iterative prototyping as twenty-first century affordances of learning through play. Secondly, this thesis uses observation-based design ethnography of the Montessori method, to argue that Montessori’s restrictive pedagogy can be counterproductive to learning through intuitive processes of exploration and iteration. Thirdly, by adapting the practice-based research method of research through design (RtD), the thesis demonstrates and proposes that twenty-first century design affordances of tinkering and iteration can be suitably integrated to enrich historic play-based learning environments such as the Montessori method. In each of these arguments, the ways in which pedagogic theories of play are interwoven with the language of design thinking are revealed. By bringing into focus the triad of play, pedagogy, and design, an additional educational landscape of twenty-first century cultural learning environments is explored. Cultural learning environments (CLEs) such as museums and public galleries extend the scope of play-based learning beyond formalised spaces of schools and bring into relief, the predominance of design while incepting platforms, ateliers, and activities to initiate learning through play.

Language: English

Published: Edinburgh, Scotland, 2021

Advanced Search