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Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Private Education in the Absence of a Public Option: The Cases of the United Arab Emirates and Qatar

Available from: Lehigh University

Publication: FIRE: Forum for International Research in Education, vol. 3, no. 2

Pages: 41-59

Asia, Middle East, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Western Asia

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Abstract/Notes: In the face of rising demand for private schooling in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Qatar, a lack of affordable schooling options, monopolistic behavior of private education providers, and unpredictable government regulations have created a complex and unequal education sector. This research employs a mixed methods comparative approach to explore the ways in which private education providers navigate the regulatory schooling environments and assess the impact on education stakeholders in the UAE and Qatar. The study finds that there are considerable socioeconomic differences in terms of who has access to schooling and that a growing for-profit education sector may be deepening existing inequities in both countries, leaving poorer expatriate families only able to access low-quality education or in the worst cases, unable to access education at all. The promise of non-profit providers as a viable alternative to ensure access is explored.

Language: English

DOI: 10.18275/fire201603021076

ISSN: 2326-3873

Article

Lifting the Veil [schools in the United Arab Emirates]

Publication: Montessori Courier, vol. 5, no. 1

Pages: 16–17

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Language: English

ISSN: 0959-4108

Doctoral Dissertation

The Growth of the Montessori Movement in the United States, 1909-1970

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Americas, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to examine the growth of the Montessori Movement in the United States during the periods 1909-1921 and 1952-1970. The Montessori system was viewed as an innovation in American education and special attention was directed to the leaders of the movement and the role they played in its growth. The primary sources used for the initial period were the papers of Mabel Bell kept in the Bell Room of the National Geographic Society and the McClure Manuscripts housed in the Lilly Library at Indiana University. For the latter period, the following sources were utilized: American Montessori Society files, files of Whitby School, tape recordings from the American Montessori Society, interviews with Nancy Rambusch, Cleo Monson, John McDermott and correspondence with Mario Montessori and Margaret Stephensen. In addition to visits to the original Casa dei Bambini in Rome and modern Case in Italy, many Montessori schools in the United States were observed. The background of Dr. Montessori was discussed and the influences, principles and contributions of her method were examined. The period from 1909-1921 was analyzed with reference to the leadership of Maria Montessori, S.S. McClure, Mabel Bell, Helen Parkhurst and William Kilpatrick. The social, educational, political, theoretical and communications problems were examined to determine possible reasons for the demise of Montessori education in that era. The renascance [sic] of Montessori education in the United States (1952-1970) was examined with emphasis on the leadership of Mario Montessori, Nancy Rambusch, Margaret Stephenson, Cleo Monson and John McDermott. The areas of social, educational, theoretical and communications were studied for likely reasons for the resurgence of Montessori education in America. A paradigmatic schema was used to compare the role of the leaders in each period: Policy maker- Maria Montessori and Mario Montessori; Promoter- S.S. McClure and Nancy Rambusch; Organizer- Mabel Bell and Cleo Monson; Disciple- Helen Parkhurst and Margaret Stephenson; Professional Educator- William Kilpatrick and John McDermott. The qualities of leadership which led to the original demise of the Montessori Movement were: 1) Mistrust and lack of direct contact with United States educators and Montessori promoters by Maria Montessori; 2) Withdrawal of lecture and film rights from S.S. McClure by Dr. Montessori; 3) Dissolution of Montessori organizations by Mabel Bell and Helen Parkhurst because of lack of confidence in them by Maria Montessori; 5) Strong influence by William Kilpatrick (who did not believe in the Montessori method) on kindergarten teachers. The rebirth of the Montessori Movement was influenced by: 1) Mario Montessori's strong adherence to the original ideas of Maria Montessori; 2) Nancy Rambusch's proper use of leadership and timing and the formation of the American Montessori Society by her; 3) The organized efforts of the American Montessori Society and its teacher-training and public relations function by Cleo Monson; 4) The loyalty and knowledge displayed by Margaret Stephenson in running the Association Montessori Internationale teacher-training course in Washington; 5) the efforts of John McDermott to put Montessori in an American cultural context in teacher-training and professionalization of Montessori education. The writer finds strong indications for the thesis that it was the leadership which effected the growth of the Montessori Movement in the United States and recommends further research into other educational innovations in the United States such as the British Infant School Movement and Headstart with attention to the leadership.

Language: English

Published: New York, 1971

Doctoral Dissertation

Characterizing the Conversation: A Historical Re-view of Maria Montessori's Visits to the United States, 1913-1918

Available from: Virginia Tech Libraries

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Abstract/Notes: This historical re-view of the events and interactions of Maria Montessori's visit to the United States between the years 1913 and 1918 begins by examining Montessori's personal history, with an emphasis on her educational background leading up to her becoming the first female physician in Italy. After discussing her scientific background briefly, the document specifically addresses several of Montessori's educational concepts. Next, this study examines specific nuances of organization, power and intent found in the educational system of the United States at the time of her visits. Particular emphasis is placed on the implications of industrialization, increasing immigration and the response of the educational establishment to these issues. Interactions and events from her visits in the United States follow. Montessori's influences on and experiences with prominent figures in the U.S. at that time are accentuated through the events that highlight her travels. After detailing each visit in the historical context in which it occurred, the piece continues with the author's discussion of how the dissertation applies to teaching history in the foundations. The piece concludes with conceptual suggestions of ways to increase diverse social awareness and encourage community-based responses of pre-service and in-service public school educators.

Language: English

Published: Blacksburg, Virginia, 1997

Conference Paper

Exploring the Role of Montessori Pedagogy on Students in Early Childhood Schools with Saudi Arabia

Available from: IATED Digital Library

11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies

Asia, Middle East, Saudi Arabia, Western Asia

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Abstract/Notes: This study explores the role of Montessori pedagogy for early childhood pupils in Saudi Arabian. In order to fulfil this aim, this study collected data from a sample of 12 teachers in different five schools in order to explore their attitudes towards the adoption of Montessori pedagogy in early childhood schools. Two types of data collection methods (i.e. interviews and questionnaire) were used in this study. The numeric data collected from the questionnaire was analysed statistically and the textual data collected from interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. The findings indicate that teachers believe that using Montessori Pedagogy can help students in early childhood as it enhances their learning quality and performance. Furthermore, using Montessori pedagogy is preferable among teachers of younger ages. However, an efficient adoption of Montessori pedagogy requires sufficient experience from the teachers in using this pedagogy. Other factors that influence the attitudes of teachers towards using Montessori pedagogy include availability of specialist support and the existence of training courses for teachers. In regard to limitations, the results of this study cannot be generalized to the whole population due to the small size of sample adopted in this research.

Language: English

Published: Palma, Spain: International Academy of Technology, Education and Development (IATED), 2019

Pages: 5362-5362

DOI: 10.21125/edulearn.2019.1316

ISBN: 978-84-09-12031-4

Article

Challenges of Implementing Montessori English Teaching Model in Saudi Arabian Elementary Schools

Available from: The Egyptian Knowledge Bank

Publication: مجلة دراسات في المناهج وطرق التدريس [Journal of Studies in Curriculum and Teaching Methods], no. 245

Pages: 1-25 (Article 2)

Asia, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Middle East, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Saudi Arabia, Western Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori English Teaching Model (METM) is a unique way of instruction that uses specifically designed learning settings and approaches to nurture students' intrinsic desire to learn. English achievements for Saudi students have been for long very low. The current study aimed to investigate the real challenges of implementing Montessori English Teaching Model in Saudi Arabian elementary schools. Qualitative method, namely focus group discussion, was used. Four purposive focus groups with different educational positions and experiences were formulated, namely school supervisors (SS), school principals (SP), English teachers (ET), and English curriculum specialists (ES). The major findings of the study were that1) major challenges existed for implementing the METM in Saudi elementary schools, 2) the challenges concentrated on four categories: educational context, work ethics and environment, nature of teachers and students, and social aspects, and 3) agreements on some of the sub-themes fluctuated. Recommendations for further investigations are made for interested and educational personnel.

Language: Arabic

DOI: 10.21608/mjat.2019.101825

ISSN: 2535-213X

Article

The Montessori Society of the United Kingdom

Available from: HathiTrust

Publication: The Child (London), vol. 3, no. 12

Pages: 1133

England, Europe, Great Britain, Montessori Society (United Kingdom), Northern Europe, Northern Ireland, Scotland, United Kingdom, Wales

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Language: English

ISSN: 0855-0026

Doctoral Dissertation

Nisaidie nif anye mwenyewe, Pomogi mne eto sdelat' samomu: A comparative case study of the implementation of Montessori pedagogy in the United Republic of Tanzania and The Russian Federation

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Africa, Comparative education, East Africa, Eastern Europe, Europe, Russia, Sub-Saharan Africa, Tanzania

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Abstract/Notes: The system of education developed by Maria Montessori, noted Italian feminist, anthropologist and physician, is the single largest pedagogy in the world with over 22,000 public, private, parochial, and charter schools on six continents, enduring even as other teaching methods have waxed and waned. Despite its international diffusion and longevity, research into the pedagogy is glaringly absent from mainstream educational literature. The purpose of this study is, first, to explore Dr. Montessori's involvement in international conferences and examine how the exchange of ideas by participants may have influenced her pedagogy. Second, this study investigates the implementation of Montessori pedagogy in two countries, the United Republic of Tanzania and the Russian Federation, focusing on the interplay of teacher training, classroom practice, and culture. This comparative multiple case study was designed to differentiate what is universal in the Montessori pedagogy and what is country specific or culture bound. Observations in classrooms guided by a checklist of ten essential elements, interviews with teachers, trainers and leaders of Montessori associations, and historical and contemporary documents are the primary sources of data. The results of the data indicate that limited economic resources, the quality of training, government regulations and availability of Montessori books translated into the Kiswahili and Russian languages influence the implementation of Montessori pedagogy in the United Republic of Tanzania and the Russian Federation to a greater extent than culture. Montessori pedagogy as implemented in Tanzania is thriving and is providing much needed quality education for young children. Several factors influence its implementation, but poverty permeates through all the classrooms and is the most significant. Montessori pedagogy as implemented in Russia also is thriving, in spite of the challenge of consistent training. Impressive efforts such as the work of the Belgorod Montessori Study Center to develop the theoretical understanding and practical applications of cosmic education and Michailova Montessori School's experiment in integrating into a self-managed government school may determine whether Montessori remains on the periphery of pedagogy or moves to the center, influencing future policy.

Language: English

Published: Minneapolis, Minnesota, 2010

Article

News from the United Nations: Good News–of Sorts

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 12, no. 3

Pages: 13

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Abstract/Notes: Includes sidebar on peace curriculum by Minnesota chapter of United Nations Association of the United States

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Doctoral Dissertation

Assessment Practices Used by Montessori Teachers of Kindergarten Through Sixth Grade Students in the United States

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Americas, Assessment, Montessori method of education - Teachers, Teachers, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This research explored student evaluation practices used by Montessori elementary teachers. The Montessori teaching method emphasized students learning at their own pace within a prepared environment where the teacher's role was somewhat different compared to traditional classroom settings. Both traditional and alternative methods of student assessment were utilized by Montessori teachers (e.g., anecdotal records, informal conferences with students, observation of students, one-to-one interview with students, checklists of lessons, demonstration of skill mastery, and standardized achievement tests). The methodology and reasoning behind student evaluation was not well understood by the educational community, and today's dynamic cultural environment demands better attention to this subject. Following a literature review of assessment practices, analysis consisted of sampling member schools of the American Montessori Society (AMS). A questionnaire was submitted to 241 eligible AMS member schools with elementary programs across the United States, and 108 responses (representing 30% of the eligible schools) were collected. The questionnaire's items (27 total questions) were refined to 16 research questions which were analyzed using both quantitative and qualitative methods. A number of results were produced. The two most prominent were: Montessori elementary teachers used more alternative than traditional methods of assessment practices; and, the factors that influenced the assessment practices used by Montessori teachers were the make up (student:teacher ratio, individual student's needs, multi-aged range) of students in the classroom and the Montessori method of education. Other results of this study included: Montessori schools used standardized achievement tests but individual respondents were not convinced they fit the Montessori method of teaching; and, the combination of non-graded report cards, anecdotal records, and student portfolios were successful reporting practices for parent teacher conference. The study concluded with identifying several areas of assessment practice where future research and professional development may benefit Montessori administrators, teachers, students, and parents.

Language: English

Published: Memphis, Tennessee, 1999

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