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Article

The Montessori Society of the United Kingdom

Available from: HathiTrust

Publication: The Child (London), vol. 3, no. 12

Pages: 1133

England, Europe, Great Britain, Montessori Society (United Kingdom), Northern Europe, Northern Ireland, Scotland, United Kingdom, Wales

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Language: English

ISSN: 0855-0026

Article

‘The Jigsaw Culture of Care’: A Qualitative Analysis of Montessori-Based Programming for Dementia Care in the United Kingdom

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: Dementia, vol. 20, no. 8

Pages: 2876-2890

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, England, Europe, Gerontology, Great Britain, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI), Northern Europe, Northern Ireland, Scotland

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori-Based Programming (MBP) in dementia care refers to a growing body of research and practice that has developed Montessori methods to facilitate self-paced learning, independence and engagement for people living with dementia. A number of research gaps have been identified in the existing literature such as a lack of cross-cultural studies and well-powered, robustly designed outcome studies. The current study investigated the use of MBP with a focus on provision in the United Kingdom. It aimed to identify MBP implementation approaches, challenges and barriers, and research gaps.Design and MethodsA qualitative design was implemented to analyse data from in-depth, semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders (N = 8) with experience of MBP in the UK. Participants included care home management and staff, MBP trainers and independent dementia experts with a background in Montessori methods. Thematic analysis identified 4 main themes and 12 sub-themes. The study took place between April 2019 and October 2019.FindingsA framework describing knowledge and understanding of MBP in the UK, implementation considerations, challenges and barriers, evidence of outcomes and research gaps was developed to provide guidance for researchers and practitioners. Implementation considerations included using a whole-home approach and changing the culture of care through management support. Barriers to implementation included conservative attitudes to care, perceived lack of time and resources, health and safety issues, and issues of sustainability.ConclusionThe benefits of MBP in dementia care are promising but require further empirical investigation. There is a need to design, execute and publish evidence to secure the support of key stakeholders in dementia care research, policy and commissioning in the UK.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/14713012211020143

ISSN: 1741-2684, 1471-3012

Article

The Teacher Educator and the Suffragist: Lillian De Lissa and Muriel Matters’ Activism in Australia and the United Kingdom

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: History of Education, vol. 50, no. 6

Pages: 820-836

Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Europe, Lillian de Lissa - Biographic sources, Muriel Matters - Biographic sources, Northern Europe, Oceania, United Kingdom

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Abstract/Notes: Focusing on the transnational circulation of ideas about suffrage and education, this article explores the work of suffragist Muriel Matters (1877–1969), and teacher educator Lillian de Lissa (1885–1967). It begins with Matters’ and de Lissa’s childhoods and education in post-suffrage Australia, and their initial work as an actress and kindergarten teacher respectively. The second section focuses on the development of their politics when Matters migrated to England in 1905 and joined the Women’s Freedom League, and de Lissa became the foundation principal of the Adelaide Kindergarten Training College in 1907. The third section discusses their engagement with Maria Montessori’s educational approach, which Matters incorporated into her socialist feminist activism during the First World War, and which led to de Lissa’s recruitment to England as a liberal feminist teacher educator in 1917. The final section highlights their advocacy for Montessori education in the United Kingdom during the interwar years.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/0046760X.2021.1906457

ISSN: 0046-760X, 1464-5130

Doctoral Dissertation

Teacher Beliefs, Attitudes, and Expectations Towards Students with Attention Disorders in Three Schools in the United Kingdom's Independent School System

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, Attention-deficit-disordered children, Children with disabilities, England, Europe, Inclusive education, Northern Europe, Northern Ireland, Perceptions, Scotland, Teachers - Attitudes, United Kingdom

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Abstract/Notes: Scope and method of study. The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate the connection between the beliefs, attitudes, and expectations teachers exhibit towards students who have attention challenges in three independent schools in England and the pathognomonic-interventionist continuum as identified by Jordan-Wilson and Silverman (1991), which identifies, along a scale, where teachers' beliefs lie. Teachers' sense of efficacy as they meet individual student needs was also explored as was what educators in these schools, who have limited, if any, recourse to special education assistance, do to support students who display the characteristics of attention deficit. The pathognomonic-interventionist continuum and Bandura's (1977) construct of self-efficacy were the lenses used to focus the research. The study records participants' responses and reflections about the phenomenon under study, describing what it is they do, how they perceive their responsibility towards their students, and how they support each other. Findings and conclusions. Data compiled from a sample of 10 teachers and 3 head-teachers, were disaggregated to provide a picture of how participant teachers work with attentionally challenged children in selected English independent schools. The results provide evidence that teachers whose profile identifies them with the interventionist perspective present stronger senses of self-efficacy. They are prepared to undertake prereferral-type activities to determine where the student is experiencing difficulty and are then willing to manipulate the learning environment to meet individual student needs. Teachers in these schools perceive it as their professional obligation to design teaching scenarios to benefit all students. Teacher efficacy, their sense of their ability to positively influence their students' educational performance and achievement, is unrelated to years of experience or educational background, but is related to the beliefs which they hold.

Language: English

Published: Stillwater, Oklahoma, 2006

Article

A History of Montessori in the United Kingdom

Publication: Montessori Society Review, vol. 19

Pages: 6–19

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

Book Section

Montessori Education in the United Kingdom

Book Title: Perspectives on Montessori

Pages: 99-110

England, Europe, Great Britain, Northern Europe, Northern Ireland, Scotland, United Kingdom, Wales

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Language: English

Published: Deventer, Netherlands: Saxion Progressive Education University Press, 2022

Edition: 1st edition

ISBN: 978-94-92618-56-6

Doctoral Dissertation

The Growth of the Montessori Movement in the United States, 1909-1970

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Americas, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to examine the growth of the Montessori Movement in the United States during the periods 1909-1921 and 1952-1970. The Montessori system was viewed as an innovation in American education and special attention was directed to the leaders of the movement and the role they played in its growth. The primary sources used for the initial period were the papers of Mabel Bell kept in the Bell Room of the National Geographic Society and the McClure Manuscripts housed in the Lilly Library at Indiana University. For the latter period, the following sources were utilized: American Montessori Society files, files of Whitby School, tape recordings from the American Montessori Society, interviews with Nancy Rambusch, Cleo Monson, John McDermott and correspondence with Mario Montessori and Margaret Stephensen. In addition to visits to the original Casa dei Bambini in Rome and modern Case in Italy, many Montessori schools in the United States were observed. The background of Dr. Montessori was discussed and the influences, principles and contributions of her method were examined. The period from 1909-1921 was analyzed with reference to the leadership of Maria Montessori, S.S. McClure, Mabel Bell, Helen Parkhurst and William Kilpatrick. The social, educational, political, theoretical and communications problems were examined to determine possible reasons for the demise of Montessori education in that era. The renascance [sic] of Montessori education in the United States (1952-1970) was examined with emphasis on the leadership of Mario Montessori, Nancy Rambusch, Margaret Stephenson, Cleo Monson and John McDermott. The areas of social, educational, theoretical and communications were studied for likely reasons for the resurgence of Montessori education in America. A paradigmatic schema was used to compare the role of the leaders in each period: Policy maker- Maria Montessori and Mario Montessori; Promoter- S.S. McClure and Nancy Rambusch; Organizer- Mabel Bell and Cleo Monson; Disciple- Helen Parkhurst and Margaret Stephenson; Professional Educator- William Kilpatrick and John McDermott. The qualities of leadership which led to the original demise of the Montessori Movement were: 1) Mistrust and lack of direct contact with United States educators and Montessori promoters by Maria Montessori; 2) Withdrawal of lecture and film rights from S.S. McClure by Dr. Montessori; 3) Dissolution of Montessori organizations by Mabel Bell and Helen Parkhurst because of lack of confidence in them by Maria Montessori; 5) Strong influence by William Kilpatrick (who did not believe in the Montessori method) on kindergarten teachers. The rebirth of the Montessori Movement was influenced by: 1) Mario Montessori's strong adherence to the original ideas of Maria Montessori; 2) Nancy Rambusch's proper use of leadership and timing and the formation of the American Montessori Society by her; 3) The organized efforts of the American Montessori Society and its teacher-training and public relations function by Cleo Monson; 4) The loyalty and knowledge displayed by Margaret Stephenson in running the Association Montessori Internationale teacher-training course in Washington; 5) the efforts of John McDermott to put Montessori in an American cultural context in teacher-training and professionalization of Montessori education. The writer finds strong indications for the thesis that it was the leadership which effected the growth of the Montessori Movement in the United States and recommends further research into other educational innovations in the United States such as the British Infant School Movement and Headstart with attention to the leadership.

Language: English

Published: New York, 1971

Article

Five Kingdoms: End of a Montessori Controversy? [Review of Five Kingdoms: A Illustrated Guide to the Phyla of Life on Earth, 1988, Lynn Margulis and Karlene Schwartz]

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 5, no. 1

Pages: 13

Book reviews, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Doctoral Dissertation

Characterizing the Conversation: A Historical Re-view of Maria Montessori's Visits to the United States, 1913-1918

Available from: Virginia Tech Libraries

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Abstract/Notes: This historical re-view of the events and interactions of Maria Montessori's visit to the United States between the years 1913 and 1918 begins by examining Montessori's personal history, with an emphasis on her educational background leading up to her becoming the first female physician in Italy. After discussing her scientific background briefly, the document specifically addresses several of Montessori's educational concepts. Next, this study examines specific nuances of organization, power and intent found in the educational system of the United States at the time of her visits. Particular emphasis is placed on the implications of industrialization, increasing immigration and the response of the educational establishment to these issues. Interactions and events from her visits in the United States follow. Montessori's influences on and experiences with prominent figures in the U.S. at that time are accentuated through the events that highlight her travels. After detailing each visit in the historical context in which it occurred, the piece continues with the author's discussion of how the dissertation applies to teaching history in the foundations. The piece concludes with conceptual suggestions of ways to increase diverse social awareness and encourage community-based responses of pre-service and in-service public school educators.

Language: English

Published: Blacksburg, Virginia, 1997

Doctoral Dissertation

Assessment Practices Used by Montessori Teachers of Kindergarten Through Sixth Grade Students in the United States

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Americas, Assessment, Montessori method of education - Teachers, Teachers, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This research explored student evaluation practices used by Montessori elementary teachers. The Montessori teaching method emphasized students learning at their own pace within a prepared environment where the teacher's role was somewhat different compared to traditional classroom settings. Both traditional and alternative methods of student assessment were utilized by Montessori teachers (e.g., anecdotal records, informal conferences with students, observation of students, one-to-one interview with students, checklists of lessons, demonstration of skill mastery, and standardized achievement tests). The methodology and reasoning behind student evaluation was not well understood by the educational community, and today's dynamic cultural environment demands better attention to this subject. Following a literature review of assessment practices, analysis consisted of sampling member schools of the American Montessori Society (AMS). A questionnaire was submitted to 241 eligible AMS member schools with elementary programs across the United States, and 108 responses (representing 30% of the eligible schools) were collected. The questionnaire's items (27 total questions) were refined to 16 research questions which were analyzed using both quantitative and qualitative methods. A number of results were produced. The two most prominent were: Montessori elementary teachers used more alternative than traditional methods of assessment practices; and, the factors that influenced the assessment practices used by Montessori teachers were the make up (student:teacher ratio, individual student's needs, multi-aged range) of students in the classroom and the Montessori method of education. Other results of this study included: Montessori schools used standardized achievement tests but individual respondents were not convinced they fit the Montessori method of teaching; and, the combination of non-graded report cards, anecdotal records, and student portfolios were successful reporting practices for parent teacher conference. The study concluded with identifying several areas of assessment practice where future research and professional development may benefit Montessori administrators, teachers, students, and parents.

Language: English

Published: Memphis, Tennessee, 1999

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