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Conference Paper

Multistructural Model of Speech and Language Development in Montessori Pedagogy

Available from: ICLEL

2nd International Conference on Lifelong Education and Leadership for ALL-ICLEL 2016

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Abstract/Notes: The goal of the article is to provide theoretical justification of the speech and language development multistructural model, analyse speech therapists’ opinion about the significance of various language development preconditions in the child’s speech and language development, as well as justify application options of the multistructural model in the Montessori pedagogy aspect. In Latvia every second or third pre-school aged child has insufficient or impaired speech and language development. Assessing the child’s language development, it has to be taken into account how it is influenced by the combination of different endogenous and exogenous factors, which lie into a diverse mutual interaction. The interaction model of factors in each individual case is different and it determines the individual character of the child’s language development process. The speech or language impairment is not quite often the leading (primary) symptom, but as a part of an illness, specific psychological or socially economic condition and is considered as a secondary phenomenon. In order to state all possible causes of the language development delay or impairment, their possible interaction and to work out an appropriate correction and development plan, the peculiarities of the speech and language development multistructural model of each individual case have to be found out. Understanding the reasons of the insufficient language development or impairment and their elimination, reduction or compensation guarantees a more efficient pedagogic or speech therapy correction process. However, teachers or speech therapists do not always observe it in their professional work, as still the main attention is being paid to the expressions of development insufficiency or impairment and not to the causal identification and decrease of their negative impact. Montessori pedagogy is as one of the methods, in which the holistic approach is implemented in the educational and also correction process, and thus also the speech and language development multistructural model.

Language: English

Published: Sakarya, Turkey: ICLEL Conferences, Sakarya University Faculty of Education, 2016

Pages: 429-437

ISBN: 978-605-66495-1-6

Article

Montessori Eğitiminin Çocukların Gelişimine Etkisinin İncelenmesi / Investigation of the Effects of Montessori Education on Children's Development

Available from: Academia

Publication: Hacettepe University Graduate School of Educational Sciences - The Journal of Educational Research, vol. 1, no. 1

Pages: 32-52

Asia, Middle East, Montessori method of education, Turkey, Western Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Bu araştırmada, Montessori yaklaşımı doğrultusunda gerçekleştirilen öğretmen eğitimi ve eğitim ortamınındüzenlenmesi sonucu üç, dört ve beş yaş (36-72 ay) grubundaki (deney ve kontrol grubu) çocuklara verilen Montessori yaklaşımına dayalı eğitimin çocukların gelişim alanları üzerindeki etkisini saptamakamaçlanmıştır. Araştırmada, Montessori yaklaşımına dayalı eğitimin çocukların gelişim alanlarına olanetkisini belirlemek amacıyla ön test ve son test kontrol gruplu deneysel desen kullanılmıştır. Ankara Üniversitesi Uygulama Anaokulu 1’e devam eden çocuklar deney grubunu, okul yöneticileri ile öğretmengörüşleri doğrultusunda benzer özelliklere sahip olduğu düşünülen bir üniversite anaokuluna devam edençocuklar ise kontrol grubunu oluşturmuştur. Araştırmada demografik verileri toplamak amacıyla “Genel BilgiFormu”, çocukların gelişim alanlarını değerlendirmek için Alpern (2007) tarafından geliştirilen Gelişimsel Profil 3 (GP3) ile Mardell ve Goldenberg (1998) tarafından geliştirilen Öğrenmenin Değerlendirilmesi için Gelişimsel Göstergeler 4 (ÖDGG-4) kullanılmıştır. Montessori yaklaşımına dayalı eğitim öncesinde ilkolarak Montessori eğitim ortamı oluşturulmuş ve gelişimsel değerlendirme labratuvarı hazır halegetirilmiştir. Ardından öğretmenler “Montessori Uygulayıcıların Eğitimi” kapsamında eğitim almışlardır.Çalışma sonucunda öğretmen görüşüne göre ÖDGG-4’den elde edilen bulgular incelendiğinde, deney vekontrol grubundaki çocukların öz bakım becerileri ile sosyal duygusal gelişim alt boyutu puanlarında, ebeveyn görüşlerine göre öz bakım becerileri alt boyutu ile toplam gelişim puanlarında deney grubu lehineanlamlı farklılık olduğu saptanmıştır. GP-3’e ait sonuçlar incelendiğinde de deney ve kontrol grubundakiçocukların öğretmen görüşlerine göre uyumsal davranış boyutunda; ebeveyn görüşlerine göre fizikselgelişim, bilişsel gelişim, iletişim alt boyutları ile toplam gelişim puanlarında deney grubu lehine anlamlıfarklılık olduğu belirlenmiştir. / The present study was aimed at determining the development levels of children aged three, four andfive (36-72 months) attending Ankara University Practice Preschool 1, and the effect of Montessorieducational approach on their areas of development. A pretest, posttest, retention test experimental designwith control group was adopted in the study to determine the effect of Montessori educational approach on children’s areas of development. The experimental group consisted of children attending Ankara University Practice Preschool 1, while the control group consisted of attending a randomly selected university preschool with similar qualifications. The General Information Form was used for data collection purposes,while the Developmental Profile 3 (DP-3) developed by Alpern (2007) and the Developmental Indicators forthe Assessment of Learning 4 (DIAL-4) developed by Mardell and Goldenberg (1998) whose validity and reliability studies were used as assessment tools to evaluate children’s areas of development. Prior to theimplementation of Montessori education, Montessori educational environment was prepared and adevelopmental assessment laboratory was set up. Thereafter, teachers received the MontessoriPractitioner Training. DIAL-4 results according to teachers’ opinions revealed significant differences between the children in experimental and control groups in self-help skills and social emotional development subscale scores, while according to parents’ opinions, there were significant differences in the self-help skills subcale and overall development scores. DP-3 results revealed significant differencesbetween the children in experimental and control groups in the adaptive behavior subscale according to teachers’ opinions, and physical development, cognitive development and communication subscale scores,as well as, overall development scores of the DP-3 according to parents’ opinions.

Language: Turkish

Doctoral Dissertation

The Developmental Psychology of Maria Montessori (Italy)

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori is historically recognized for her contributions to early education. Her primary recognition derived from the comprehensive educational program which became known as the Montessori Method. Relatively little attention has focused on her background as physician, psychiatrist, and pedagogical psychologist, from which she developed a body of psychological knowledge which established the foundation of the well-known Method. Her pedagogical psychology was overshadowed by her pedagogical theory despite her secure position in the history of child psychiatry. Also contributing to the non-acceptance of Montessori's psychology was the psychological tenor of the times. In the forefront of the psychological movement in the early 1900's were psychometric testing, Freud's psycho-sexual stages, Thorndike's stimulus-response theory, and the emergence of behaviorism under the leadership of Watson, to name a few. This climate was not hospitable to Montessori's developmental-interactionist theory. In the 1960's through the research findings of psychologists and the availability of Federal funds to compensate the "cumulative deficits" of the disadvantaged child, interest was focused on early childhood education and consequently the Montessori Method. As psychologists embraced Piaget's developmental theory, resemblances in thinking between Piaget and Montessori were noted. While psychologists pointed to Montessori's developmental-interactionist ideas, nobody attempted to elaborate her developmental theory in toto. This study attempts to do so. For Montessori, the development of the child takes place in successive and qualitatively different stages, with each stage providing the foundation for succeeding stages. Within this framework, she clearly delineates cognitive, motor, language, socialization, personality, and character as developing through stages. Cognitive structures develop through the child's interaction with, and actions upon, objects in the environment. A thorough examination of her theory leaves no doubt that Montessori is a cognitive developmentalist. While at times she appears nativistic, and at other times an extreme environmentalist, her position on development is interactionist and constructivist. Montessori is historically recognized for her contributions to early education. Her primary recognition derived from the comprehensive educational program which became known as the Montessori Method. Relatively little attention has focused on her background as physician, psychiatrist, and pedagogical psychologist, from which she developed a body of psychological knowledge which established the foundation of the well-known Method. Her pedagogical psychology was overshadowed by her pedagogical theory despite her secure position in the history of child psychiatry. Also contributing to the non-acceptance of Montessori's psychology was the psychological tenor of the times. In the forefront of the psychological movement in the early 1900's were psychometric testing, Freud's psycho-sexual stages, Thorndike's stimulus-response theory, and the emergence of behaviorism under the leadership of Watson, to name a few. This climate was not hospitable to Montessori's developmental-interactionist theory. In the 1960's through the research findings of psychologists and the availability of Federal funds to compensate the "cumulative deficits" of the disadvantaged child, interest was focused on early childhood education and consequently the Montessori Method. As psychologists embraced Piaget's developmental theory, resemblances in thinking between Piaget and Montessori were noted. While psychologists pointed to Montessori's developmental-interactionist ideas, nobody attempted to elaborate her developmental theory in toto. This study attempts to do so. For Montessori, the development of the child takes place in successive and qualitatively different stages, with each stage providing the foundation for succeeding stages. Within this framework, she clearly delineates cognitive, motor, language, socialization, personality, and character as developing through stages. Cognitive structures develop through the child's interaction with, and actions upon, objects in the environment. A thorough examination of her theory leaves no doubt that Montessori is a cognitive developmentalist. While at times she appears nativistic, and at other times an extreme environmentalist, her position on development is interactionist and constructivist. In contemporary terms her "psychopedagogy" would be considered an action psychology, which basically precludes it from academic "respectibility". Her theory contains both strengths and weaknesses in light of present-day thinking; however, on balance, Montessori's theory is quite contemporary and remarkably ahead of most of the psychological thinking of her time.

Language: English

Published: New York, 1982

Article

Historical View of the Planes of Development as Developmental Outcomes

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 34, no. 1

Pages: 43-54

Planes of development, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Doctoral Dissertation

Comparison of Montessori and Non-Montessori Teachers' Beliefs About Developmentally Appropriate Practice in Preschools

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: In this study, 173 preschool teachers (80 non-Montessori teachers and 93 Montessori teachers) were given a survey at two early childhood professional conferences that examined their beliefs about Developmentally Appropriate Practice (DAP). The purpose of this study was to (a) investigate preschool teachers' beliefs about Developmentally Appropriate Practice (DAP) and Developmentally Inappropriate Practice (DIP); (b) discover the similarities and differences in the factor structures of the Teacher's Beliefs Scale (TBS) between the study conducted by Charlesworth, Hart, Burts, Thomasson, Mosley, and Fleege in 1993 and the current study about DAP; (c) discover the similarities and differences of Developmentally Appropriate Practice (DAP) and Developmentally Inappropriate Practice (DIP) beliefs between Montessori teachers and preschool teachers; and (d) investigate the factors that are related to teachers' beliefs about DAP and DIP. The Teacher Beliefs Scale (TBS) was used to assess preschool teachers' beliefs about DAP and DIP. Factor analysis was used to support the validity of TBS in the current study. Multiple t-tests were used to identify the differences in developmental appropriate/inappropriate beliefs between Montessori and non-Montessori teachers. Multiple regression analyses were used to explain the relationship between variables of 173 Montessori and non-Montessori preschool teachers. Results of the study showed that a majority of preschool teachers agreed with 22 Developmentally Appropriate Practices (DAP) and 12 Developmentally Inappropriate Practices (DIP). Responses to seven items were different from the original study (Charlesworth et al., 1993). There was a significant difference on Inappropriate Activities and on Appropriate Child Choice between non-Montessori and Montessori teachers. There was a relationship between teachers' beliefs about DAP and teachers' educational backgrounds, teaching experiences, ethics, and DAP understanding level in the current study.

Language: English

Published: Greeley, Colorado, 2003

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Songs on Hmong Vocabulary Acquisition

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Americas, Bilingualism, Displaced communities, Hmong (Asian people), Hmong American children, Hmong American families, Hmong songs, Immigrants, Language acquisition, North America, Refugees

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Abstract/Notes: This action research assessed the effects of singing a song to learn language in a bilingual classroom. The research took place at a bilingual Hmong-English Montessori preschool program. 28 preschool-aged children participated in the research which was conducted over five weeks. Data sources included a parent questionnaire, vocabulary pre-test, vocabulary post-test with a follow-up conversation, daily observation logs, and tally sheet. The children were taught 16 Hmong vocabulary words with half the words sung to the tune of a common children’s song and the other half by simple reciting. The results from the vocabulary post-test showed that there was an increase in the children’s ability to recall Hmong vocabulary taught through the song and the follow-up conversation showed that the children enjoyed learning by singing. Further research could examine the continued use of singing vocabulary to common children’s songs and its effects on language learning in the long-term.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2019

Article

Sokszínű szótanuló – Játékos szókincsfejlesztő Montessori gyöngyökkel [Diverse Vocabulary - Playful vocabulary developer with Montessori beads]

Available from: National Széchényi Library

Publication: Magiszter, vol. 15, no. 3

Pages: 47-51

Eastern Europe, Europe, Hungary, Montessori materials

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Language: Hungarian

ISSN: 1583-6436

Doctoral Dissertation

Development of the Early Childhood Curricular Beliefs Inventory: An Instrument to Identify Preservice Teachers' Early Childhood Curricular Orientation

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: The aim of this study was to develop and field test an instrument that provides an efficient and scholarly tool for exploring curricular beliefs of preservice teachers in the area of early childhood education. The Early Childhood Curricular Beliefs Inventory (ECCBI) was developed through procedures that evaluated the content validity of identified statements, explored the criterion and construct validity, and assessed the internal reliability of the instrument. Through a literature review, four predominant approaches to early childhood education (Developmental Interaction, Cognitive Developmental, Behavioral, and Sensory Cognitive) and four associated models of implementation were identified (Developmental Interaction, HighScope, Direct Instruction, and Montessori). Six areas, in which each of the above differed, were identified: the view of the child, role of the teacher, resources utilized, curricular emphasis, assessment methodology, and characteristics of the learning environment. The aim of this study was to develop and field test an instrument that provides an efficient and scholarly tool for exploring curricular beliefs of preservice teachers in the area of early childhood education. The Early Childhood Curricular Beliefs Inventory (ECCBI) was developed through procedures that evaluated the content validity of identified statements, explored the criterion and construct validity, and assessed the internal reliability of the instrument. Through a literature review, four predominant approaches to early childhood education (Developmental Interaction, Cognitive Developmental, Behavioral, and Sensory Cognitive) and four associated models of implementation were identified (Developmental Interaction, HighScope, Direct Instruction, and Montessori). Six areas, in which each of the above differed, were identified: the view of the child, role of the teacher, resources utilized, curricular emphasis, assessment methodology, and characteristics of the learning environment. A panel of experts classified and sorted a total of 182 statements, and 72 items were subsequently organized into an instrument consisting of four subtests corresponding to the identified curricular models. Scoring of the instrument included recording Likert-scale responses for each statement to a score key divided into four sections, or subtests, representing each curricular model. Scores for each section were added and compared. The subtest with the lowest score was deemed most representative of a respondent's curricular beliefs. Data gathered through field testing of the instrument with practitioners were used to explore further content validity through a factor analysis, criterion validity, and construct validity. Results of a second field test of preservice teachers and the results of the first field test (practitioners) were used to assess internal consistency reliability. Analyses appeared to support content, criterion, and construct validity as well as reliability of the 72-item ECCBI. In an effort to reduce the length of the instrument and to make it less cumbersome, results of the factor analysis were used to create a 24-item shortened version of the ECCBI. Six items representing each of the four subtests having the strongest factor loadings were identified as appropriate statements and were then organized into an alternative instrument. Data gathered through field testing of the instrument with practitioners were used to explore further content validity through a factor analysis, criterion validity, and construct validity. Results of a second field test of preservice teachers and the results of the first field test (practitioners) were used to assess internal consistency reliability. Analyses appeared to support content, criterion, and construct validity as well as reliability of the 72-item ECCBI. In an effort to reduce the length of the instrument and to make it less cumbersome, results of the factor analysis were used to create a 24-item shortened version of the ECCBI. Six items representing each of the four subtests having the strongest factor loadings were identified as appropriate statements and were then organized into an alternative instrument.

Language: English

Published: Tallahassee, Florida, 2004

Master's Thesis

Glasba in gibanje: razvoj ritmičnih sposobnosti predšolskih otrok v vrtcih montessori [Music and Movement: The Development of Rhythmical Abilities of Children from Montessori Preschool]

Available from: Digital Library of the University of Maribor (DKUM)

Child development, Europe, Eurythmics, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Music - Instruction and study, Rhythm, Slovenia, Southern Europe

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Abstract/Notes: V magistrski nalogi smo obravnavali področje razvoja glasbenih sposobnosti s poudarkom na ritmičnih sposobnostih v povezavi z glasbenimi dejavnostmi in izhodiščem pedagoškega koncepta montessori. Želeli smo proučiti učinek glasbeno-gibalnih dejavnosti po konceptu pedagogike montessori na razvoj glasbenih sposobnosti predšolskih otrok iz vrtca montessori. Na podlagi relevantne literature s področja gibanja ob glasbi po konceptu pedagogike montessori smo oblikovali dva eksperimentalna programa. Zanimalo nas je, kakšen bo učinek teh programov in ali bodo otroci teh dveh eksperimentalnih skupin bolje razvili ritmične sposobnosti kot kontrolna skupina ter kakšne bodo razlike med napredki skupin. Uporabili smo neslučajnostni namenski vzorec 59 predšolskih otrok druge starostne skupine iz treh enot vrtca montessori iz osrednjeslovenske regije ter za potrebe raziskave prilagodili tri teste ritmičnih sposobnosti, ki smo jih povzeli po že oblikovanih testih. Najprej smo s testiranjem razvitosti ritmičnih sposobnosti v začetnem stanju ugotovili, da med skupinami ni statistično pomembnih razlik, nato sta obe eksperimentalni skupini tri mesece po trikrat tedensko izvajali eksperimentalna programa. Po koncu eksperimenta smo ponovili testiranje in zaznali statistično pomembne razlike med skupinami v razvitosti ritmičnih sposobnosti. Izvajanje obeh eksperimentalnih programov je imelo pozitiven učinek na razvoj ritmičnih sposobnosti predšolskih otroknajvečji učinek smo opazili pri eksperimentalni skupini 1, pri kontrolni skupini pa učinka neaktivnosti nismo zaznali. [In the master thesis the development of musical abilities with emphasis on rhythmical abilities in connection with musical activities based on the Montessori pedagogy was discussed. The study focused on the effect of music-movement activities that are based on the concept of the Montessori educational method on the development of musical abilities of children from the Montessori preschool. In accordance with the relevant literature from the field of musical movement based on the concept of Montessori pedagogy two experimental programs were developed. The interest of the thesis lies in the effect of these programs, if the children of the two experimental groups would develop better rhythmical abilities than the control group and what the difference in development between the groups would be. A non-probability sample, in which 59 second-age-group preschool children from three Montessori preschool units from Central Slovenia were selected, was used. For the purposes of the study, three rhythmical- ability tests, which had been adapted from previously created tests, were adjusted. An initial test of rhythmical abilities established that there are no major statistical differences between the two groups. Following this, the two experimental groups carried out the workshops of the experimental program, three times per week for a period of three months. After ending the experiment, the testing was repeated and crucial statistical differences in the development of rhythmical abilities were noted between the two groups. The implementation of both experimental programs had a positive effect on the development of rhythmical abilities of preschool children. The biggest effect was noticed in the experimental group 1, while an effect of nonactivity was not detected in the control group.]

Language: Slovenian

Published: Maribor, Slovenia, 2020

Article

The Development of Morality in the First and Second Planes of Development

Publication: AMI/USA News, vol. 19, no. 1

Pages: 1, 3, 11

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Language: English

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