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702 results

Article

Water Brings Hope to Children [Azawak or Azawagh, West Africa]

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 19, no. 3

Pages: 12–13

Africa, Mali, Niger, Sub-Saharan Africa, West Africa

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

A Child's Magic in West Africa

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 9, no. 3

Pages: 13

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Abstract/Notes: Review of Kofi and His Magic by Maya Angelou

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Doctoral Dissertation

Barriers Contributing to the Minimal Participation of African American Parents in Their Children's Schools: A Qualitative Case Study of African American Parent Involvement in an Urban K–8 Elementary School in Minnesota

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

African American community, African Americans, Americas, North America, Early childhood education - Parent participation, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Parent participation, Parent-teacher relationships, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This research is a case study of African American parent involvement at a urban Montessori school in Minnesota. African American parents at this school have had limited involvement in conferences, PTSO meetings, school activities, and on the Site-Based Leadership Team. An examination of the literature was made to investigate the influences on African American parents when they make decisions about their parental involvement. This research covered the historical background, theoretical background, implications, racial barriers, and strategies that increased African American parent involvement. An ethnography was designed to gather data from 9 mothers of African American students. These parents provided information about their backgrounds and their experiences with the school. Staff at the school (6) were interviewed as to their experiences with African American parent involvement. The results of the study offer findings on attitudes, perceptions, needs and ideas for improving African American parent involvement at any school.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2000

Article

Montessori in South Africa: The Challenge, the Dream, and the Promise

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 24, no. 1

Pages: 61-68

Africa, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Abstract/Notes: Discusses the history of the Montessori movement in South Africa. Outlines the contributions and learnings from Montessori's 21 years in South Africa. Asserts that Montessorian actions in Africa have relevance to Montessori internationally. (JS)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Venticinque anni di lavoro Montessori in Africa [Twenty-five years of Montessori work in Africa]

Publication: Vita dell'Infanzia (Opera Nazionale Montessori), vol. 43, no. 6

Pages: 48-53

Africa, Montessori method of education - History, Muriel I. Dwyer - Biographic sources, Muriel I. Dwyer - Writings

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Language: Italian

ISSN: 0042-7241

Doctoral Dissertation

Evaluating the Effectiveness of Montessori Reading and Math Instruction for Third Grade African American Students in Urban Elementary Schools

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

African American children, African American community, Americas, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Improving academic achievement for students of color has long been the subject of debate among advocates of education reform (Anyon, 2013; Breitborde & Swiniarski, 2006; Payne, 2008). Some scholars have advocated for the Montessori method as an alternative educational approach to address some chronic problems in public education (Lillard, 2005; Murray, 2011, 2015; Torrance, 2012). Montessori programs are expanding in public schools (National Center for Montessori in the Public Sector, 2014c) at a time when the American public school population is more racially diverse than ever before (Maxwell, 2014). A review of the literature reflects a lack of consensus about the efficacy of Montessori elementary instruction for students of color in general, and lack of attention to outcomes for African American students specifically (Dawson, 1987; Dohrmann, Nishisda, Gartner, Lipsky, & Grimm, 2007; Lopata, Wallace, & Finn, 2005; Mallet & Schroeder, 2015). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of reading and math instruction for third grade African American students in public Montessori, traditional, and other school choice settings, using end-of-grade standardized test scores from a large, urban district in North Carolina. Stratified sampling was used to select demographically similar traditional and magnet schools for comparison. Group mean reading and math test scores were compared using factorial MANCOVA and MANOVA procedures. African American students at grade three were found to perform at significantly higher levels in both reading and math in public Montessori schools than in traditional schools. No statistically significant difference was found in math achievement between African American third grade students in public Montessori and other magnet programs, although the Montessori group did achieve at significantly higher levels in reading. This suggests that the Montessori method can be an effective pedagogy for African American students, particularly in reading. Based on these results, recommendations are provided for policy, practice, and future research.

Language: English

Published: Charlotte, North Carolina, 2016

Master's Thesis

Montessori and Religious Education in Western Cape Preschools

Available from: University of Cape Town

Africa, Catholic schools, Comparative education, Jewish religious schools, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Religious education, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Abstract/Notes: The debate about whether or not religious education should be included in early childhood education is a longstanding one. Even those who believe that Religious education should be included in early childhood programs cannot agree about the content or method for including it. The phenomenon of religious education in Montessori pre-primary schools in the Western Cape Province of South Africa is explored in this study, using a qualitative research approach. More specifically, the study explored the goals of their religious education; the level of awareness of Montessori's approach to religious education and finally looked at how they were implementing religion in their schools. A sample of 4 pre-schools were selected from the 90 Montessori pre-schools in the Western Cape. These included a Non-Denominational, Muslim, Christian and a Jewish School. The Muslim and Non-Denominational schools are full Montessori schools, while the Christian and Jewish schools have incorporated Montessori alongside other curriculums, namely the Jubilee Excellence School Curriculum and Reggio-Emilia approach, respectively. A collective case study approach was adopted and data was collected through observations and interviews. While the findings cannot easily be generalized, it is significant in providing a starting point to understanding the phenomenon of religious education in Montessori pre-schools in the Western Cape. The study highlighted Dr Montessori's personal and professional struggle with religion and found that the struggles Dr Montessori faced in terms of Religion have still not been resolved today. The schools in the Western Cape still grappled with the essence of Montessori's struggle, i.e. where to place religion and how to integrate it in the Montessori method and philosophy. Dr Montessori's beliefs about the importance of spirituality in the early years were found to be consistent with the contemporary views of scholars around the world. The religious schools followed guidelines of their own religions when deciding on which values to focus on. At the Jewish school, the focus was on the community, while at the Muslim school the focus was on the individual and selfetiquette. The focus of the Christian school was on discipline and obedience. The schools had various commitments to spiritual and ethical development of the children. Finally, the study found that the Montessori method was ideal for teaching the practices of religion, but when schools delved into issues of faith or love of God, they switched to other modes of teaching (e.g. preaching). This disjuncture between teaching faith and practices was ultimately Dr Montessori's reason for abolishing religious education from her method.

Language: English

Published: Cape Town, South Africa, 2017

Book

De Westerweelgroep en de Palestinapioniers: non-conformistisch verzet in de Tweede Wereldoorlog

Europe, Holland, Joop Westerweel - Biographic sources, Montessori method of education - Teachers, Montessori schools, Nazism, Netherlands, Teachers, Western Europe, Westerweel Group

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Abstract/Notes: Dit boek beschrijft de fascinerende geschiedenis van de door de links-socialistische onderwijzer Joop Westerweel aangevoerde verzetsgroep, die bestond uit niet-Joodse linkse activisten en zogeheten Palestinapioniers. Dit waren merendeels Duitse Joden die zich voorbereidden op hun vertrek naar Palestina. Beide groepen hadden een marginale maatschappelijke positie, waardoor zij buiten de kaders van het verzuilde Nederlandse bestel konden opereren. Door samen te werken met uiteenlopende religieuze en sociale kringen slaagde de organisatie erin ongeveer 250 Joden in veiligheid te bren-gen. Het non-conformisme van de groep bleek ook uit de ongebruikelijk op-lossingen voor de onderduik. Een tiental pioniers reisde met valse papieren naar Duitsland. Van de 150 Joden die in Frankrijk onderdoken, slaagden er 70 in Spanje te bereiken. De Westerweelgroep betaalde een zware prijs voor zijn werk. Joop Westerweel stierf voor een vuurpeloton. Andere leden kwamen terecht in concentratiekampen, wat van grote invloed was op hun verdere leven. [This book describes the fascinating history of the resistance group, led by left-wing socialist teacher Joop Westerweel, which consisted of non-Jewish left-wing activists and so-called Palestine pioneers. These were mostly German Jews preparing to leave for Palestine. Both groups had a marginal social position, which allowed them to operate outside the framework of the pillarized Dutch system. Working with diverse religious and social circles, the organization managed to get about 250 Jews to safety. The group's non-conformity was also apparent from the unusual solutions for going into hiding. A dozen pioneers traveled to Germany with false papers. Of the 150 Jews who went into hiding in France, 70 managed to make it to Spain. The Westerweelgroep paid a heavy price for its work. Joop Westerweel died before a firing squad. Other members ended up in concentration camps, which had a major impact on their further lives.]

Language: Dutch

Published: Hilversum, Netherlands: Verloren, 2015

ISBN: 978-90-8704-497-8 90-8704-497-6

Article

The Montessori Home School, Rondebosch, South Africa

Publication: The Call of Education / L'Appel de l'Éducation / La chiamata dell'Educazione: Psycho-pedagogical Journal (International Organ of the Montessori Movement), vol. 1

Pages: 255-258

Africa, Constance Marriott - Biographic sources, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Abstract/Notes: Includes mentions of: Mrs. Leigh; Miss Constance Marriott; "Mrs. Leigh persuaded Miss Marriott to come out to South Africa, and in Ocxtober 1916, the first Montessori School was started in this sub-continent"; "The Home School comprises thge Montessori Garden Day School of 40 pupils and the Children's Hostel (the first of it's kind in South Africa), which can accommodate 20 children, from 2 years of age to 10 for boys and 12 for girls."

Language: English

Article

A Comparison of Reading and Math Achievement for African American Third Grade Students in Montessori and Other Magnet Schools

Available from: JSTOR

Publication: Journal of Negro Education, vol. 86, no. 4

Pages: 439-448

Academic achievement, African American community, African Americans, Americas, Comparative education, Lower elementary, Mathematics - Academic achievement, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, Reading - Academic achievement, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori programs are expanding in public schools, serving a large proportion of African American students. Although recent Montessori research has focused on diverse public school populations, few studies have examined outcomes for African American students at the lower elementary level. This quasi-experimental study compares reading and math achievement for African American third grade students in public Montessori and other magnet schools in a large, urban district in North Carolina. Scores from end-of-grade state tests of reading and math are compared using a multivariate analysis of covariance. No significant difference in math scores was identified, but students in Montessori schools scored significantly higher in reading. This suggests that Montessori lower elementary instruction may be beneficial for African American students.

Language: English

DOI: 10.7709/jnegroeducation.86.4.0439

ISSN: 0022-2984

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