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Book

Westerweel Group: Non-Conformist Resistance Against Nazi Germany: A Joint Rescue Effort of Dutch Idealists and Dutch-German Zionists

Available from: De Gruyter

Europe, Holland, Joop Westerweel - Biographic sources, Montessori method of education - Teachers, Montessori schools, Nazism, Netherlands, Teachers, Western Europe, Westerweel Group

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Abstract/Notes: This book about the Westerweel Group tells the fascinating story about the cooperation of some ten non-conformist Dutch socialists and a group of Palestine Pioneers who mostly had arrived in the Netherlands from Germany and Austria the late thirties. With the help of Joop Westerweel, the headmaster of a Rotterdam Montessori School, they found hiding places in the Netherlands. Later on, an escape route to France via Belgium was worked out. Posing as Atlantic Wall workers, the pioneers found their way to the south of France. With the help of the Armée Juive, a French Jewish resistance organization, some 70 pioneers reached Spain at the beginning of 1944. From here they went to Palestine. Finding and maintaining the escape route cost the members of the Westerweel Group dear. With some exceptions, all members of the group were arrested by the Germans. Joop Westerweel was executed in August 1944. Other members, both in the Netherlands and France, were send to German concentration camps, where some perished. Translation of: "De Westerweelgroep en de Palestinapioniers: non-conformistisch verzet in de Tweede Wereldoorlog".

Language: English

Published: Berlin, Germany: Walter de Gruyter GmbH, 2019

ISBN: 978-3-11-058000-6 978-3-11-058270-3 978-3-11-058014-3 978-3-11-073682-3

Series: New Perspectives on Modern Jewish History , 11

Conference Paper

Positive Socialization in an Educational Inclusion Group of a Montessori Elementary School

Available from: IATED Digital Library

8th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of the present work was to foster positive socialization in a multilevel group of a Montessori elementary school comprised by 20 students between 9 and 12 years old and many students with Special Education Needs. Positive socialization refers to the group of behaviors to aid the more vulnerable and concern for the others (Rudolph, 2000). It is important to nurture these behaviors during the school age since this is the stage where students require them to foster healthy coexistence and cooperation, as well as respect for differences and diversity among peers, which is closely related to educational inclusion, which premise is to make a school for all, for which the creation of spaces where coexistence and differences acceptance are nurtured taking into account the needs of each student (Romera, 2008). The Elementary Education Syllabus in Mexico mentions the inclusion principle, which emphasizes the teaching of values, attitudes and behaviors towards helping the others (Secretary of Public Education, 2011). Under this perspective, a traditional empirical quantitative applied field study was conducted. The design was of only one group, with two pretest-posttest measurings in which also 5 teachers participated in the group activities. The group was assessed in Positive socialization by means of the Socialization Battery BAS-3 by Silva and Martorell (1987) which defines a child’s profile by five factors. The pretest results indicated five subjects obtained a scoring below the mean value in the Concern for the others scale, this meant the subjects had little social sensitivity or concern for others. In addition, the Inclusive Practices in the Classroom Evaluation Guideline in its observation and self-report version by Garcia, Romero and Escalante (2009) was applied, which allowed to measure the levels of educational inclusion in the group. The results determined that four teachers obtained a scoring below the mean value in the planning area scale. Based on the pretest results obtained from both instruments, an intervention program was designed based on the Cooperative play proposal by Garaigordobil (2004), to foster prosocial behaviors, while the decision taking according to the students’ needs were worked with the teachers. At the end of the intervention, a posttest was applied to the group and the results indicated a significant increment in the positive socialization, especially, the behaviors towards helping the others in the students with the lowest scores from the pretest; teachers planning also improved to achieve a more inclusive environment in the group. The results were validated with the non-parametric Wilcoxon test using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software.

Language: English

Published: Barcelona, Spain: International Academy of Technology, Education and Development (IATED), 2016

Pages: 7934-7941

DOI: 10.21125/edulearn.2016.0741

ISBN: 978-84-608-8860-4

Book

Where Have All the Bluebirds Gone? How To Soar with Flexible Grouping

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Abstract/Notes: Noting that there is more to grouping readers than the traditional grouping by ability, this book describes a variety of grouping patterns and ways to implement them throughout the elementary grades. It notes that flexible grouping allows teachers to address diverse classrooms with diverse needs and examines research on grouping practices in reading programs. It includes stories of teachers who have implemented flexible grouping in their reading programs, and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of each pattern. After an introduction, the chapters are: (1) Grouping Patterns in Reading Instruction: What Research Tells Us; (2) Whole Group Instruction: One Text For All Readers; (3) Flexible Small Group Instruction: Different Books and Different Purposes for Different Groups; (4) Individualized Reading Programs: Different Books for Each Reader; (5) Cooperative Grouping: Mixed Groups for a Common Purpose; (6) Paired Grouping: Partners for Many Purposes; (7) Wee Readers: Reading

Language: English

Published: Portsmouth, New Hampshire: Heinemann, 2002

ISBN: 0-325-00437-4

Article

Group Flow and Group Genius

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 40, no. 3

Pages: 29-52

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Abstract/Notes: Keith Sawyer views the spontaneous collaboration of group creativity and improvisation actions as "group flow," which organizations can use to function at optimum levels. Sawyer establishes ideal conditions for group flow: group goals, close listening, complete concentration, being in control, blending egos, equal participation, knowing team mates, good communication, and being progress-oriented. Collaboration is an essential ingredient of group flow and is vital to the Montessori classroom. The author has included a notes section with bibliographic information. [Reprinted with permission from chapter 3 of "Group Genius: The Creative Power of Collaboration." New York: Basic Books. Copyright 2007 by Keith Sawyer.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Book

De Westerweelgroep en de Palestinapioniers: non-conformistisch verzet in de Tweede Wereldoorlog

Europe, Holland, Joop Westerweel - Biographic sources, Montessori method of education - Teachers, Montessori schools, Nazism, Netherlands, Teachers, Western Europe, Westerweel Group

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Abstract/Notes: Dit boek beschrijft de fascinerende geschiedenis van de door de links-socialistische onderwijzer Joop Westerweel aangevoerde verzetsgroep, die bestond uit niet-Joodse linkse activisten en zogeheten Palestinapioniers. Dit waren merendeels Duitse Joden die zich voorbereidden op hun vertrek naar Palestina. Beide groepen hadden een marginale maatschappelijke positie, waardoor zij buiten de kaders van het verzuilde Nederlandse bestel konden opereren. Door samen te werken met uiteenlopende religieuze en sociale kringen slaagde de organisatie erin ongeveer 250 Joden in veiligheid te bren-gen. Het non-conformisme van de groep bleek ook uit de ongebruikelijk op-lossingen voor de onderduik. Een tiental pioniers reisde met valse papieren naar Duitsland. Van de 150 Joden die in Frankrijk onderdoken, slaagden er 70 in Spanje te bereiken. De Westerweelgroep betaalde een zware prijs voor zijn werk. Joop Westerweel stierf voor een vuurpeloton. Andere leden kwamen terecht in concentratiekampen, wat van grote invloed was op hun verdere leven. [This book describes the fascinating history of the resistance group, led by left-wing socialist teacher Joop Westerweel, which consisted of non-Jewish left-wing activists and so-called Palestine pioneers. These were mostly German Jews preparing to leave for Palestine. Both groups had a marginal social position, which allowed them to operate outside the framework of the pillarized Dutch system. Working with diverse religious and social circles, the organization managed to get about 250 Jews to safety. The group's non-conformity was also apparent from the unusual solutions for going into hiding. A dozen pioneers traveled to Germany with false papers. Of the 150 Jews who went into hiding in France, 70 managed to make it to Spain. The Westerweelgroep paid a heavy price for its work. Joop Westerweel died before a firing squad. Other members ended up in concentration camps, which had a major impact on their further lives.]

Language: Dutch

Published: Hilversum, Netherlands: Verloren, 2015

ISBN: 978-90-8704-497-8 90-8704-497-6

Book

The MAGnet Newsletter on Mixed-Age Grouping in Preschool and Elementary Settings, 1992-1997 [Volumes 1-6]

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: These 11 newsletter issues provide a forum for discussion and exchange of ideas regarding mixed-age grouping in preschool and elementary schools. The October 1992 issue focuses on the mixed-age approach as an educational innovation, defines relevant terms, and presents advice from Oregon teachers on teaching mixed-age groups. The March 1993 issue discusses: how children learn to care for the needs of others; preparing the environment for mixed-age grouping; and communicating with parents and visitors. a Multi-Age Classroom Observation Guide is also presented. The October 1993 issue discusses applying Piagetian theory to the mixed-age classroom; identifies the support needed to institutionalize mixed-age primary level classes; provides cautions for caregivers of mixed-age groups; and discusses use of parent workshops on the whole-language multi-age classroom. The Spring/Summer and Fall/Winter 1994 issues address student assessment in mixed-age classrooms and highlight the approach taken in individual programs. The Spring/Summer 1995 issue discusses implementing the mixed-age classroom and the benefits of mixed-age grouping. The Fall/Winter 1995 issue introduces the concept of looping and its advantages and disadvantages. The Spring/Summer 1996 issue focuses on using mixed-age grouping for at-risk students. The Fall/Winter 1996 issue examines how mixed-age grouping helps children develop social skills and a sense of belonging, and the potential risks of mixed-age grouping. The Spring/Summer 1997 issue deals with the risk of bullying in mixed-age groups. The Fall/Winter 1997 issue discusses sociodramatic play in the mixed-age setting. Regular features in most newsletter issues include "Quotable Quotes," relevant brief quotations regarding mixed-age groups; and descriptions of recent publications and other print and electronic resources. (KB)

Language: English

Published: Champaign, Illinois: ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education, 1997

Article

Effect of Intervention Guided by Montessori Method on Improving Feeding Capacity of Patients with Dementia

Available from: International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine

Publication: International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, vol. 13, no. 2

Pages: 1148-1155

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI), ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: This study was designed to analyze the effects of intervention guided by Montessori Method on patients with dementia. Methods: 85 patients diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in our hospital were included for retrospective analysis and were divided into 2 groups by double-blind randomized method. The control group (n=42) received routine guides on dieting, and the observation group (n=43) was intervened under the guides of Montessori Method. The 2 groups were compared for cognitive function, feeding capacity score, feeding difficulty, voluntary feeding time, and nutriture. Results: (1) After intervention, the observation group yielded a higher MMSE score for cognitive function than the control group (P<0.001); (2) The scores of feeding capacity in both groups achieved increase, which in the observation group was higher than that in the control group 1 month after intervention (P<0.001); (3) The scores of feeding difficulty in both groups achieved decrease, which in the observation group was lower than that in the control group after intervention (P<0.001); (4) For voluntary feeding time as intervention completed, 1 month and 3 months after intervention, the observation group reported prominent extension (P<0.001) while the control group achieved shortening gradually (P<0.001), and the voluntary feeding time in the observation group was longer than that in the control group (P<0.001). Conclusion: Intervention guided by Montessori Method helps patients with dementia by reducing their feeding difficulty and improving their cognitive function, feeding capacity, and nutriture. It is a method deserving popularization.

Language: English

ISSN: 1940-5901

Conference Paper

The Effects of Multiage Grouping on Verbal Interaction, Achievement and Self-Concept

Annual Conference of the American Association of School Administrators (112th, Anaheim, California, February 15-18, 1980)

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Abstract/Notes: Two studies were conducted on the effects of multiage classrooms. The first study investigated verbal interaction among children of different age groups and student-teacher interaction in multiage classrooms. Existing multiage classrooms in various settings were observed and information was recorded on the ages of the children initiating and receiving each interaction, the number of children in each age group who initiated interactions to the teacher, and the number of children in each age group who were present in the classroom. Interactions were classified as dominant, submissive, or neutral. Results indicate: (1) older children tended to initiate proportionately more interactions when three ages were grouped together, but not when only two ages were grouped together; (2) children of one age did not dominate the teacher's attention; (3) interaction within age groups was high and interaction between age groups was low when three age groups were present, but not when two age groups

Language: English

Published: Arlington, Virginia: American Association of School Administrators, Feb 1980

Book Section

A Comparison of Multi-Age and Homogeneous Age Grouping in Early Childhood Centers

Available from: ERIC

Book Title: Current Topics in Early Childhood Education

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Abstract/Notes: Studies from several countries are described in this review of literature pertinent to assigning day care children to multi-age or homogeneous age groups. Three issues are discussed in this regard: (1) What difference does it make how one groups children? The answer is that a profound difference to children, staff, and parents may occur in terms of social environment, curriculum design, success at school, and other factors. (2) What aspects of the child's development are affected by age grouping? The answer is that multi-age grouping positively influences social, emotional, and some learning outcomes, whereas homogeneous grouping seems to produce mastery of academic skills. Success of particular grouping choices depends on the end desired and on the skills of staff members. (3) How does age grouping affect the achievement of preschool goals? The answer to this question ultimately can be provided only by a center's staff and the families being served. Because research is still being conducted on the effects of grouping children under 6 years of age, the decision to place children in multi-age or homogeneous groups depends on program goals, client characteristics, center resources, and staff training and inclinations.

Language: English

Published: Norwood, New Jersey: Ablex, 1982

ISBN: 978-0-89391-109-6

Volume: 4

Article

The Efficacy of Memory Training Using Montessori Philosophy-based Activities in Mild Dementia Elderly

Available from: Thai Journals Online

Publication: Journal of the Psychiatric Association of Thailand, vol. 54, no. 2

Pages: 197-208

Alzheimer's disease, Asia, Dementia, Gerontology, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI), Southeast Asia, Thailand

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Abstract/Notes: AbstractObjective: To compare the memory scores in mild dementia elderly who attended Montessori-based Memory training with the control group who did not.Method: The Solomon four-group design was used to test the memory of the subjects. The subject of the study consisted of 40 elderly at Banbanglamung Social Welfare Development Center for Older Persons. Participants were divided to 2 experimental and 2 control groups by random sampling technique. Mini mental status Exam-Thai 2002 and Thai Geriatric Depression scale were used as a tool in selecting the subject and a tool to differentiate the mild dementia elderly group from the depressed group. The digit span and digit symbol subtests of The Wechsler Intelligence scale were used in memory testing. The data obtained was analyzed by means of descriptive statistics, t-test and one-way ANOVA.Results: The average scores of the digit span and digit symbol of the experimental groups and the controlled groups were significantly different (p<0.05). After 4 weeks of training, the average scores ofthe experimental groups increased more than that of the controlled group. After training, the average scores of memory of the four groups were significantly indifferent (p<0.05). Digit symbol scores of the experimental groups were higher than of the controlled groups by using LSD method.Conclusion: After memory training, the average scores of the digit span and digit symbol of the experimental groups were significantly higher than the controlled group. This differentce still persistedat the 12th week of training. Therefore, this memory training should be used with the elderly to prevent and delay dementia.

Language: Thai

ISSN: 2697-4126

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