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500 results

Article

Children of the World [Montessori Children's World, Neenah, Wisconsin]

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 28, no. 3

Pages: 4–5

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Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation

Language Learning and Technology in and for a Global World

Available from: University of California eScholarship

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Abstract/Notes: More than ever before, schools and societies are looking to educate children in and for a global world. In the United States, these efforts have taken the form of increased interest in incorporating global or international perspectives into educational curricula, programs, and policy over the past decade (Hayden, 2011; Parker, 2011; U.S. Department of Education, 2012). Despite this interest in what I call global education, ambiguity remains regarding what it means to provide an education for a globalized world, both in terms of its underlying motivations and its ultimate execution in practice (Ortloff, Shah, Lou, & Hamilton, 2012).Two components often placed at the heart of these efforts in the United States—second/foreign language and digital technology—both reflect and contribute to understandings of global education. This study, rooted in an ecological theorization of discourse, asked how different school actors (teachers, administrators, parents, and students) position these two components in education today, how these positionings differ across groups, and what this means for understandings of global education. These questions were investigated through two complementary approaches: a survey distributed to a large cross-section of schools around the United States and an in-depth focal case study of one school. The survey was distributed to teachers, students, parents, and administrators at a broad range of U.S. secondary schools and assessed perceptions of second/foreign language and digital technology in education today. The focal case study focused on two secondary classrooms at a multilingual immersion K-8 school in the western US over a four-month period; data collection included field notes, analytic memos, and audio/video recordings from participant observations as well as multiple rounds of interviews with five students, four teachers, two administrators, and three parents. Data were analyzed using iterative rounds of inductive and deductive coding (Miles & Huberman, 1994; Saldaña, 2009) and critical discourse analysis (Blommaert, 2005; Fairclough, 2001).Findings suggest that second/foreign language and digital technology were positioned in a range of different ways that had concrete ramifications for schools and that built up divergent understandings of global education. The survey component of the study highlighted common discourses reproduced across groups, including: second/foreign language learning as a way to promote cultural understanding and awareness as well as economic opportunity; or digital technology as a threat to learning and as an omnipresent necessity. The focal school offered a more detailed look into these different discourses and their reproduction across groups. Analysis revealed trended similarities and differences across groups. For example, even though parents, teachers, and administrators often articulated a similar understanding of second/foreign language and digital technology, parental actions suggested more alignment with economic-based understandings of these two components. These differences in how second/foreign language and digital technology should be positioned within a global education created a “battle” between parents and the focal school as well as tension within the learning environment. The impact of these discourses and battles on students was unclear: while students at times voiced the discourses that their parents, teachers, and administrators reproduced, data also suggests that students were influenced by outside sources. These findings suggest that resulting understandings of global education were multiple and divergent across school groups. Data analysis also revealed the potential that anxiety, concern, or even fear of globalization and its effects could undergird adult understandings of second/foreign language and of digital technology: beneath economic as well as cultural motivations for second/foreign language and for digital technology learning resided trepidation about a changing world, changing identities, and the unknowns that lay ahead. This suggests that, underneath multiple and complex discourses, there can be a singular discourse that manifests in different ways, nuancing understandings of ecological approaches to discourse. It also suggests that different understandings of global education could stem from the same place: fear or anxiety in the face of a globalizing world. These findings highlight the need for a global education that equips students to navigate a changing world, its challenges, and any potential fears that may arise from these changes and challenges. The study concludes with a pedagogical framework built around discourse analysis that could offer students tools to understand their globalizing world.

Language: English

Published: Berkeley, California, 2017

Article

UNESCO World Heritage Sites and Montessori World Heritage Sites

Publication: AMI Bulletin, no. 1

Pages: 15

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

Article

Montessori World in Tennessee [Montessori World of Children, Chattanooga, Tennessee]

Publication: Montessori Observer, vol. 4, no. 6

Pages: 4

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Language: English

ISSN: 0889-5643

Article

Practical Life as a Model for Connecting the Child to his World

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 44, no. 1

Pages: 27-35

Africa, Nigeria, Sub-Saharan Africa, West Africa

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Abstract/Notes: Using examples from the Fruitful Orchard School in Abuja, Nigeria, Junnifa Uzodike reminds us of the special power of practical life activities to connect the young child to the world. Engagement with work that is in service to others, that tends to the natural world, and that attends to the needs of the self prepares the child to be an independent individual who moves confidently within the world, yet whose sense of gratitude for the gifts of history and the natural world moves them to act with conscientious intention and be an agent for peace.

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

The Natural World as Prepared Environment

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 39, no. 1

Pages: 41-59

Child development, Conservation of natural resources, Early childhood education, Ecology, Montessori method of education, Natural resources, Prepared environment, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Louise Chawla's autobiographical beginning of this article shows the integration of her world-famous science of the environment and its relationship to early and middle childhood development as it finds its roots in Montessori education. Her academic training brought her to Edith Cobb's writing and unveiled the origins of kinship to the natural world in the developing young human. Her own exploration of nature and culture caused her to return to Montessori writings with a fresh understanding of the natural world as a prepared environment. Louise Chawla stresses that children must frequently encounter "the natural world with empathy and delight" and the prepared environment supports them as they become creative citizens of humanity. [This paper was prepared for the NAMTA Conference titled "Deschooling Montessori" January 25, 2002, in Scottsdale, AZ. Reprinted from "The NAMTA Journal" 27.3 (2002, Summer): 131-148 (see EJ661570).]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Montessori's Plan for the More Beautiful World Our Hearts Know is Possible

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 31, no. 1

Pages: 30-35

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: A year ago, I was asked to think about peace education at the Secondary level. In each plane, developmental aspects serve to lay the groundwork for the next plane-beginning with the growth of focus and concentration and joy in work, and then, in the Elementary years, a fascination with the intricate nature of things, and next, at the Adolescent level, a sense of community and a love of humanity. While Montessori education continues to be validated by studies in education and developmental psychology, the Montessori Method is still the only game in the world of education when it comes to having both a specific, scaffolded, spiraling approach to education and a clear vision and mission for peace. The main task is not to learn the method, but to open to a new way of life for the child. [...]it is necessary for the teacher to have an inner preparation.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

The Montessori Method: Cultivating the Potential of the Child to Build a More Peaceful World

Available from: DOAJ

Publication: Journal of Unschooling and Alternative Learning, vol. 4, no. 8

Pages: 40-57

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Dr. Maria Montessori provided the world with a powerful philosophy and practice for the advancement of humanity: change how we educate children and we change the world. She understood two things very clearly: One, that we can build a better world, a more just and peaceful place, when we educate for the realization of the individual and collective human potential; and two, that the only way to create an educational system that will serve this end is to scrap the current system entirely and replace it with a completely new system. She gave us a system through which to accomplish that goal: The Montessori Method. The following is a personal and professional account of the Montessori Method of educating children.

Language: English

ISSN: 1916-8128

Article

Bonding with the Natural World: The Roots of Environmental Awareness

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 38, no. 1

Pages: 39-51

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: With delicate literary style and allusions, Louise Chawla combines her ecological research and Montessori background to portray the unfolding of childhood in natural places. Starting with "enchantment with the world" as the basis for nature education for the child under six, the article suggests that the "loose parts" in the landscape that children manipulate and use result in optimal creative involvement. The act of finding favorite places in all weather, combined with the companionship of an adult role model, leads to a lifelong appreciation, concern, and activism for the natural world. [Reprinted from "The NAMTA Journal" 28,1 (2003, Winter): 133-154. This paper was prepared for the NAMTA Conference titled "Montessori Education for Human Development: The Child and the Natural World," October 31-November 3, 2002 in Chicago, IL.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Hawaiian Culture-Based Education and the Montessori Approach: Overlapping Teaching Practices, Values, and Worldview

Available from: JSTOR

Publication: Journal of American Indian Education, vol. 50, no. 3

Pages: 5-25

Americas, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, North America, North America, United States of America, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this qualitative case study was to investigate why the Montessori approach has been viewed as a culturally congruent educational model by some Hawaiian language immersion and culture-based (HLIC) educators and how aspects of it have been used in HLIC classrooms. Data collection included semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions with 40 Hawaiian educators, document analysis, and visits to 12 school sites. Using grounded theory methodology, similarities in core teaching strategies based on shared values and worldview emerged. Challenges and nuanced distinctions were also revealed, along with an emerging and uniquely Hawaiian pedagogy. Findings indicate that educators and researchers should take worldview and beliefs into account when designing programs and creating both preservice and inservice training opportunities.

Language: English

ISSN: 0021-8731

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